Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 605 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 121 - Next  Jump:
2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 9903 words || 
Info
1. Kruvand, Marjorie. "Synthetic Biology, Real Issues: U.S. Media Coverage of Synthetic Biology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p581819_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Synthetic biology is an emerging field that aims to design and build novel organisms by engineering man-made sequences of genes and assembling them in new combinations. While synthetic biology offers promise for developing cleaner fuels, creating pharmaceuticals, cleaning up pollutants, and fixing defective genes, it has been accompanied by environmental, ethical, and philosophical issues. Building on studies of earlier media coverage in the U.S. and Europe, this study uses sourcing choices and framing theory as the theoretical framework to analyze U.S. media coverage from 2008 through 2011. The sources and frames reporters use to shape their stories, as well as how potential promises and perils of synthetic biology are delimited and discussed, could help influence public perceptions as well as future financial investment and political support. This qualitative and quantitative content analysis examines the sources and frames in stories, the overall tone, and the mention of potential risks and benefits. The study finds that journalists relied predominantly on scientists as sources and highlighted their backgrounds and personalities in ways that further legitimized them. Since synthetic biologists – especially those who are both academics and entrepreneurs – have a strong interest in promoting synthetic biology, the overall framing and tone of stories was highly positive. Meanwhile, the views of critics were marginalized. Reporters did not define synthetic biology in relationship to biotechnology nor replay the controversies over agricultural biotechnology and genetically engineered foods. Rather, journalists used metaphors and analogies about construction and computers to describe synthetic biology research.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 25 pages || Words: 9631 words || 
Info
2. Kelle, Alexander. "Biological Weapons Disarmament: The USA and the Contestation of Norms Against Biological Weapons, 1991 – 2005" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p250560_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The development, production and use of biological weapons (BW) is prohibited by international treaties. Details of this prohibition have been codified in the Biological Weapons Convention of 1972, which forms the core of the BW control regime and contains the core norms of the regime. This paper follows a reflexive approach to international norms, in which norms are not immutable, but subject to change over time and in which certain social practices can lead to norm contestation and change. Clearly such a norm contestation is more likely to have an impact on regime evolution if the norms are contested by a great power like the United States of America, rather than a norm contestation by, say Belgium.
Applying such a reflexive approach to the norms of the biological weapons (BW) prohibtion regime, the paper will proceed in four steps. It will first provide a brief outline of the conceptual underpinnings of the approach to norms of international regimes and their contestation. Second, it will describe the normative structure of the BW prohibition regime as it presented itself during the 1990s. This will be followed by an analysis of social practices within the USA, as they manifested themselves in discursive interventions by actors in the political system . The fourth step will trace the impact of this norm contestation on the international level, where the social practices to be analysed will focus on the negotiations for a Compliance Protocol to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC), their collapse and the setting-up of the so-called “New Process” to strengthen the effectiveness of the BW regime. The paper will conclude with a (preliminary) assessment of the implications of the norm contestation through the US on the international level for the future of the BW prohibition regime and its normative structure.

2017 - 4S Annual Meeting Words: 237 words || 
Info
3. Wanderer, Emily. "Plasticity and Possibility in Regenerative Biology: Model Organisms and New Human Biologies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston MA, Aug 30, 2017 <Not Available>. 2018-10-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1271533_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Biologists studying developmental and regenerative biology are exploring new possibilities for the plasticity of human biology; in this paper, I analyze recent research that makes the claim that human bodies have hidden capabilities for regeneration and reconfiguration. Biologists making these arguments about the plasticity and potential of human bodies draw on cross species comparisons and model organisms, particularly the axolotl salamander, to suggest new possibilities for the plasticity of human capabilities and ways in which injury, aging, sex, and reproduction might be transformed. Axolotls, a salamander native to Mexico, can regenerate a remarkable range of body structures, including entire limbs and tails, eye and heart tissues, and the central nervous system. They can also be induced to change sexes, among their other unusual biological capabilities. Drawing on fieldwork in Mexico, scientific papers, and informal communications among the community of scientists who use axolotls as model organisms, this paper analyses how axolotls are reinterpreted not as exceptional, but rather as models demonstrating that regeneration and plasticity are fundamental biological processes that should be considered potential attributes of human bodies as well. This paper considers what it means to interpret both human and axolotl bodies as plastic and flexible, particularly as the extinction of the axolotl in the wild in 2014 demonstrated the limits to their own biological flexibility. What are the moral and ethical dimensions of plasticity and the implications of this research for human and animal life?

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 121 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy