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2008 - 93rd Annual Convention Words: 10 words || 
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1. Gayles, Jonathan. "A Dull Blade: The Truncation of Progressive Black Masculinity in Wesley Snipes' Blade" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, <Not Available>. 2020-02-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275623_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: An examination of the treatment of black masculinity in Blade.

2006 - American Studies Association Words: 507 words || 
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2. Bastiaans, Aisha. "“Replicating Racial and Gender Difference: Blackness as Subtext in Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association, <Not Available>. 2020-02-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p114108_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: My panel presentation considers the science fiction film Blade Runner (1982), and its “replicant” figure, to explore how blackness, even in the absence of actual black bodies, undergirds the film’s explorations of humanity, difference, and freedom. A genetically engineered being designed for slavery in “off-world” colonies and virtually indistinguishable from humans, the replicant not only expresses ambivalence toward technological progress in the tradition of urban dystopic science fiction, but subtly articulates concerns about race. With its post-apocalyptic vision of an America degraded by multiracial freaks and dominated by multinational corporations, and its ambivalent longing for colonial slavery, Blade Runner captures cultural anxieties in the early 1980s about the changing racial composition of the post-industrial United States. Whereas scholars discussing race in Blade Runner have focused on its Orientalism, in this paper I identify the ways in which blackness is simultaneously assumed and produced in the treatment of the replicant.

How does Blade Runner engage the viewer in the attempt to solve the problem of the replicant’s liminality? In which instances does film, as a medium which relies on visual and discursive shorthand, depend upon the viewer’s desire for, and adeptness in, perceiving racial and gender difference? Might blackness function as the very mete and measure of difference- even in its absence?

An interdisciplinary inquiry into the ideological work performed by the replicant, this paper offers a close reading of Blade Runner and considers its critical reception through analyses of reviews and fan websites. Race and blackness, I suggest, can remain subtexts only through the film’s engagement with the viewer. The film responds to the provocative uncertainty between appearance and reality posed by the replicant by soliciting the viewer’s recognition of codes of racial difference. Presuming the viewer’s recognition of coded references to blackness, the film reifies these very taxonomies of difference. If this dynamic exchange between film and viewer obliquely articulates cultural concerns about race, then gender is a decidedly more apparent ideology of difference constituting hierarchies of human value. Blade Runner’s replicants present a literal example of gender programming and thereby reveal how integral gender is to the construction of blackness, and vice versa.

By way of conclusion, this presentation asks if- despite the film’s deployment of the replicant figure to reify ideologies of race and gender and make blackness a fundamental referent for difference, and indeed inferiority,- the replicant figure can be taken up critically to expose the shifting and contingent terms of racial and gender difference. Might we discuss the film and its critical reception without making recourse to binaries of blackness and whiteness, fear and fascination, self and Other, but rather utilize the replicant as a window into the ways that race operates on a spectrum of sameness and difference in which the terms of difference are contingent? “Replicating Racial and Gender Difference” thus gestures towards framing blackness as a category of difference that effectively obscures its circular logic and the fluidity of its classifications, within an over-determined condition of constraint.

2008 - 93rd Annual Convention Words: 14 words || 
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3. Cha-Jua, Sundiata. "Blackness and the Progressive Deracialization in the Blade Trilogy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, <Not Available>. 2020-02-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275622_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: An analysis of the treatment of race and racial identity in the Blade Trilogy

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 164 words || 
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4. Gooch, Kate. and Treadwell, James. "Talking Blades, Mamba, Mobiles and Pad Debts: An Ethnographic Study of the New Dynamics of Prison Violence and Bullying" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 17, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1031710_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper analyzes empirical data gathered as part of an ethnographic led appreciative inquiry where the authors undertook an extensive period of fieldwork to re-consider the specific situational, social, cultural and psychological dynamics of violence amongst young men in prison. The research began not long after a critical inspection report noted that levels of violence within the prison were unacceptably high and was conducted against a backdrop of rising levels of violence within the prison estate as whole. Of particular concern has been the significant increase in the number of serious assaults and assaults on staff. This paper examines the specific new dynamics and character of violence and victimization that were encountered during this extensive and ground-breaking study of what was dubbed 'England's worst prison'. It considers how patterns of victimization have been re-shaped by access to new technologies and the trade in mobile telephones and new psychoactive substances (often dubbed ‘legal highs’), a sub rosa economy that extends well beyond the prison walls.

2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 141 words || 
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5. Gray, Christine. "My Journey: Every Blade of Grass Has Its Angel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2020-02-29 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558386_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: A leader’s upbringing, life experiences, and daily interactions define his or her leadership style. The difference between a good leader and a great leader is his or her ability to adapt to change. In this scholarly personal narrative, I consider how my past experiences as the child of a military family have influenced my ability to make connections, develop roots, and forge bonds with others. I elaborate on these considerations by expanding on my experiences with strong, supportive mentors. The paper also includes my reflections on the process of using Photovoice to engage in inquiry through images helped me to see my life as interconnected incidents unfolding and developing in a chronological order. The process of working with others during this research emerged as central to my ability to move beyond myself, and develop an open sensitivity to my own history.

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