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2010 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6197 words || 
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1. Sharone, Ofer. "Blame Games: Why Unemployed Israelis Blame the System and Americans Blame Themselves" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p410442_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Despite searching for work under similar economic conditions, unemployed white-collar workers in Israel and the United States come to different subjective understandings of their difficulties in finding work: Israelis blame the system, while Americans blame themselves. The nature of job seekers’ subjective responses has profound individual and societal implications. Drawing on over 100 in-depth interviews with American and Israeli unemployed job seekers, and over a year of participant observations at support groups for unemployed white-collar workers at both sites, this paper develops a novel analytical framework to explain variations in the subjective responses to unemployment. While existing theories focusing on cultural explanations cannot account for such variations, the framework developed in this paper shows how these are produced by different labor market institutions, which give rise to distinct job search strategies and “games.” The American “chemistry” game and the Israeli “specs” game vary in the extent of strategic discretion that job seekers exercise in their search. Playing these distinct job search games generates particular day-to-day job search experiences that ultimately account for the varied subjective understanding of unemployment. In the process of analyzing these differences, this paper develops the theory of sociological games by demonstrating how variations in the degree of strategic discretion granted to players, which I call the game’s “player-centrality,” effects subjective interpretations of outcomes.
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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 16 pages || Words: 7290 words || 
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2. Bailey, David. and Broome, Andre. "The Blame Game: From Blame Avoidance to Multi-Level Blame Displacement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414832_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: International institutions are well established in the literature as a source of blame avoidance. However, this occurs in parallel with a less-noted tendency for international institutions themselves to seek to avoid blame, typically through reference to

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 37 pages || Words: 8839 words || 
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3. Antony, Mary Grace. "The Blame Game: Media Rituals and Blame in Recurrent Technological Disasters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374719_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study analyzed how blame patterns emerge and develop in recurring technological disasters, specifically the 2008 Manhattan crane collapses. A quantitative content analysis examined newspaper coverage in the New York Daily News and The New York Times following each disaster. Results corroborated the principal tenets of Attribution Theory (Heider, 1958; Hindman, 2003) and the media as societal guard dog theory (Donohue et al., 1995). The implications of these results and future research opportunities are discussed.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Words: 195 words || 
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4. Beazer, Quintin. and Reuter, Ora John. "Who’s to Blame: Economic Performance & Blame in a Centralized Political System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1118164_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Does appointing local officials make central government officials accountable for local economic outcomes? The effects of political centralization on economic performance has attracted much scholarly attention, but existing research tells us little about the political consequences of those economic outcomes for leaders of centralized political systems. The question of whether political centralization heightens regime leaders' accountability for local economic outcomes is particularly important within non-democratic regimes, where economic performance legitimacy is a key source of regime stability. Using political and economic data from mid- and large-sized Russian cities for the period 2000-2012, we investigate whether the cancellation of mayoral elections has affected how voters attribute blame for economic outcomes. We employ a difference-in-differences design to identify how economic performance has affected electoral support at the municipal level for Vladimir Putin’s party, United Russia, and find that in cities where executives are appointed by the center, rising unemployment is associated with a drop in the ruling party's vote share in regional legislative elections. In contrast, in municipalities where voters can still punish their local executive at the ballot box, poor local economic performance has no discernible effect on electoral support for United Russia at higher levels.

2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7407 words || 
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5. Capelos, Tereza. "From Love to Blame: Voters’ Emotional Reactions and Candidates’ blame" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p278242_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Favorable evaluations based on evaluations of personality and party bonds often operate as a protective shield for political candidates (Fenno 1978; Capelos 2002). Little is known however about the intersection of favorable evaluations based on party bonds with citizens’ emotional reactions of anxiety generated in political campaign settings. Anxiety as a reaction to political events has distinct implications for political decision making, by promoting careful processing of available information. Absence of anxiety is associated with heuristic processing (Marcus 2000). In this paper, I study the way in which anxiety affects the way citizens evaluate leaders in light of political scandals and also examine the structural and political determinants of anxiety and aversion in a campaign setting. I report the results of a two-stage experimental study which determines whether anxiety blocks or conditions the impact of favorable party bonds on evaluations of scandal impact. The results show that anxious citizens follow a different decision making path for assessments of responsibility in comparison to their non-anxious counterparts, and against expectation make use of motivational consideration generated by party bonds.

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