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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 10113 words || 
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1. Liu, Xun. "To Blog or Not to Blog, That is the Question: The Role of Personality, Cognition, and Emotion on Blogging Intentions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, Nov 11, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p368121_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Based on social cognitive theory and the big five personality model, the current study examines the role of culture, personality, cognition, and emotion factors on blogging intentions among American and Chinese bloggers. The significance of this study is that, to the author’s knowledge, it is the first cross-cultural study that examines the impact of social and personal factors on blogging intentions.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 50 pages || Words: 15311 words || 
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2. Wallsten, Kevin. "Blogs and the Bloggers Who Blog Them: An Analysis of the Who, What and Why of Blogging" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85406_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: “Blogging,” the act of writing and maintaining an on-line journal, is an increasingly popular form of political expression among elites and non-elites alike. Indeed, recent studies of blogging suggest that there may be as many as 1 million political “blogs” on the internet. Despite this increasing popularity, however, political blogs have received very little attention in the political science literature. This paper attempts to address this oversight by doing three things. First, I discuss the growth and evolution of the political blogging phenomenon and attempt to offer an efficient and reliable operational definition of political blogs. Second, with this operational definition of political blogging in mind, I identify four questions that are likely to be of interest to political scientists: (1) how political blogging effects political bloggers? (2) which factors influence an individual’s decision to engage in political blogging? (3) what impact the political blogosphere has on social level variables? (4) what independent variables explain the content of political blogs? Finally, I attempt to shed some light on these questions by selecting a random sample of political blogs on the internet and engaging in a systematic content analysis of their texts. In the end, I conclude that a combination of content analysis of political blogs and surveys of political bloggers is the best method for understanding the who’s, what’s and why’s of political blogging.

2010 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 5305 words || 
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3. Ji, Hong. and Sheehy, Michael. "Blogging the Meltdown: Comparing the Coverage of the Economic Crisis in Journalistic Blogs vs. Non-Journalistic Blogs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Denver Sheraton, Denver, CO, Aug 04, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p434257_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This content analysis examines coverage of the U.S. economic crisis of 2008-2009 by 25 economics blogs. The study sought to identify differences in the coverage by bloggers identified as journalists and non-journalists. The study found that journalist bloggers and non-journalist bloggers focused on different dominant topics in their blog posts, indicating different perspectives in the framing of coverage. The study also found differences in the way that journalist and non-journalist bloggers cited sources and hyperlinks.

2008 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 33 pages || Words: 2020 words || 
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4. Johnson, Thomas. and Kaye, Barbara. "Can you Teach a New Blog Old Tricks? How Blog Users Judge Credibility of Different Types of Blogs for Information About the Iraq War" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 06, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p269264_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study employed an online survey to examine the extent to which blog users judge different types of blogs as credible. More specifically, this study examines the extent to which blog users judge general information, media/journalism, war, military, political, corporate and personal blogs as credible. The study will also examine the degree to which reliance on blogs for war information predicts their credibility after controlling for demographic and political factors. War and military blogs were judged the most credible.

2014 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6708 words || 
Info
5. Heim, Kyle. "Blog Sites and Blog Cites: Newspaper Journalists' Use of Blogs as News Sources (2004-2013)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Le Centre Sheraton, Montreal, Canada, Aug 06, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p745495_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study analyzed newspaper articles from 2004 to 2013 in which blogs were cited as news sources (N = 802). Results revealed that the blogs generally were not featured prominently within the articles, and the practice of citing blogs as sources has declined since 2010. Although researchers generally have focused on the role of blogs in political coverage, the citing of blogs occurred more frequently in articles about business and technology and in general news items.

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