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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 7470 words || 
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1. Tew, Chad. "The Popularization of the Baghdad Blogger: A Case Study of the Authentication of a Blogger and Social Affiliation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93034_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: How do weblogs and possibilities for different relationships create social affiliations? The Baghdad Blogger wrote about life in Baghdad as war loomed. The authentication of Salam Pax, his pseudonym, during the preparation for the invasion of Iraq first occurred in the blogosphere. Fellow bloggers debated whether he was “real” or a “hoax.” Supporters made their case. Later, those bloggers vouched for him when journalists investigated his credibility as a source during the invasion. For communications scholars, a case study of Salam’s authentication reveals the importance of the blog as a venue for mediated and interpersonal social interaction, as well as parasocial interaction. This paper explores through a qualitative analysis the creation of social affiliation through these relationships as Salam’s “text” was recontextualized from a blog to other media. Moreover, the popularization of Salam Pax illustrates how relationships between populations have been altered by the internet in wartime.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 31 pages || Words: 8102 words || 
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2. Smith, Brian. "The Evolution of the Blogger: Blogger Considerations of Public Relations Content in the Blogosphere" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p370425_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Blogging has become a legitimate platform for individuals to shape conversations about the issues that affect them. This personal medium for self-expression has also become a channel for organizations to gain publicity. The question of a professional influence in a personal space raises questions about blogger decision-making and ethics in representing corporate interests. This study reveals that bloggers consider their sites as extensions of themselves, and that their consideration of reader and corporate interests evolves.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 4767 words || 
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3. Schoneboom, Abigail. "Anonymous Bloggers and Organizational Coping Strategies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 11, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104074_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Workbloggers – employees who write online diaries about their work -- are often simultaneously productive workers and savage critics of the corporate cultures in which they toil. Blogging about one's work life is a way of maintaining an emotional and intellectual distance between one's private and work selves, and new corporate management theories and their resultant jargon provide rich material for writers of a satirical bent.
The collision of personal, political, and corporate space resulting from the phenomenon of workblogging has led to several high profile “fired blogger” cases and negative publicity that have sent human resources and management professionals scrambling for solutions. Companies have attempted to stifle workblogging by increasing surveillance, developing blogging policies that discourage the practice, but this strategy conflicts ideologically with corporate cultures based on self-management and informal social exchange.
Several companies are experimenting with an alternate strategy -- “corporate blogging” – creating policies that embrace employee bloggers, encouraging them to reveal their identities and blog openly about work. However, anonymous bloggers have refused to be co-opted, responding with renewed commitment to their practice, maintaining a global critical dialogue about the labor process that transcends individualized resistance and contains the potential for an organized and vocal movement.

2008 - International Communication Association Pages: 14 pages || Words: 6531 words || 
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4. Campbell, Heidi. and LaPastina, Antonio. "How the iPhone Became Divine: Bloggers, Religion, and Intertextuality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 21, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p232940_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to explore the intertextuality within story of the iPhone being framed as the “Jesus phone” and the relationship between religious language, imagery, and technology. The iPhone as the Jesus phone highlights an interesting interaction between technology fans, news media and corporate advertising. It also demonstrates how different groups may interact and appropriate the language and imagery of another to communicate very different meanings and intentions. Intertextuality serves as a valuable framework to specifically unpack how religion was employed as a helpmate to sell technology and reflect on how religious language and imagery may be utilized to communicate both positive and negative aspects of a technology.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 18 pages || Words: 4257 words || 
Info
5. Lanosga, Gerry. "The Blogger as Journalist" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2018-11-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p375968_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This is a secondary analysis of Pew Internet data from a 2006 survey of bloggers. The bloggers were analayzed by cohorts, with particular attention to those who view their blogs as journalism. Using journalistic standards such as fact-checking and source attribution correlated significantly with levels of audience attention reported by those bloggers. This finding tempers enthusiasm about journalistic characteristics of bloggers as a whole that stem from the failure to distinguish between types of bloggers.

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