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2006 - International Studies Association Pages: 16 pages || Words: 10911 words || 
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1. Epstein, Charlotte. "Guilty Bodies, Productive Bodies, Destructive Bodies: Crossing the Biometric Borders" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p97842_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper examines the forms of power brought into play by the deployment of biometrics under the lenses of Foucault’s notions of discipline and biopower. These developments are then analysed from the perspective of governmentality, highlighting how the broader spread of biometrics throughout the social fabric owes, not merely to the convergence of public and private surveillance, but rather to a deeper logic of power under the governmental state, orchestrated by the security function, which ultimately strengthens the state. It is associated with the rise of a new governmentality discourse, which operates on a binary logic of productive/destructive, and where, in fact, the very distinctions between private and public, guilty and innocent – classic categories of sovereignty – find decreasing currency. However, biometric borders reveal a complicated game of renegotiations between sovereignty and governmentality, whereby sovereignty is colonized by governmentality on the one hand, but still functions as a counterweight to it on the other. Furthermore, they bring out a particular function of the ‘destructive body’ for the governmental state: it is both the key figure ruling the whole design of security management, and the blind spot, the inconceivable, for a form of power geared towards producing productive bodies.

2012 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 100 words || 
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2. Cumings, Susan. "Textual Odd Bodies and Bodies at Odds: Releasing the Subjugated Knowledges of Trans Bodies Through Contemporary Trans Autobiographies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Oakland Marriott City Center, Oakland, CA, <Not Available>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p572878_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Using theorists Couser, Butler, Twigg, and Hall, I bridge disability and queer theories to examine transgender autobiography through the uniting notion of the “odd body,” or body at odds. Contemporary trans writers including Valerio, Cromwell and Boylan eschew chronological narratives of transformation, foregrounding instead a transgressional “both-and-ness” to the supposed “passing” trans body. Using discourse to create textual hybrid bodies ("odd bodies") as stand-ins for the real, they challenge social constructions of “authentic” gendered bodies and suggest new categories of recognition, giving life to Butler’s assertion that paradox is the inevitable condition of possibility for a socially recognized, liveable life.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 27 pages || Words: 12535 words || 
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3. Bellanova, Rocco. and González Fuster, Gloria. "Body Scanners, Scanned Bodies: Turning Subjects Into Objects of Security? On The (Unobserved) Body As A Mediator Of Security Practices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500396_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The use of body scanners for border security purposes allows for their conceptualization as security objects. But body scanners are not only material objects of security per se: they are also instruments enabling the transformation of human subjects into ‘immaterial security objects’, i.e. anonymized digital body images. This objectivation can be explained as
a reaction to legal frameworks for the protection of privacy and personal data that grant a special status to any data relating to identifiable subjects. By breaking the formal links between digitized images and
individuals to which they relate, the legal operation at the heart of privacy and personal data protection is radically obstructed. This paper critically discusses this practice, describing how the use of body scanners reduces subjects to mere bodies, virtualizes them and renders them non-identifiable to facilitate their treatment as security objects.
Furthermore, it analyses how control over such practice becomes a legal and technological battlefield in which different programs and settings tend to
hijack each other. The paper draws on, and questions, Latour’s insights, and reviews other theoretical attempts to conceptualize politics of security’s
focus and action on individuals, mainly the (post)foucaldian and deleuzian approaches adopted by Agamben, Bigo, Haggerty and Ericson.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 5763 words || 
Info
4. Azocar, Cristina. and Markova, Ivana. "News Media, Body Image and Culture: Influence on Body Image and Body Attitude in Men" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1281597_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: A survey of racially and culturally diverse undergraduate men examined the news media’s influence on their body image and body attitude. While testing showed no significance between exposure to news media and body dissatisfaction there was a correlation between exposure to news media and social comparison. African American respondents felt the most dissatisfied with their bodies when they compared themselves to their peers and also agreed more often than other ethnic groups about desiring to be thinner, counter to research findings about African American women. The implications of the research are discussed.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8153 words || 
Info
5. Crawford, Cassandra. "You Don’t Need a Body to Feel a Body: Phantom Limb Syndrome and Corporeal Transgression" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2018-05-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p560854_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the central tensions within the literature on body studies concerns the degree to which the physical body is constituted by/through language, knowledges, and practices and the degree to which the body has foundational, purely material, or essential attributes. As a means of adjudicating between the socially constructed and phenomenological body, science and technology studies (STS) advances a form of relational materialism that is concerned with the material aspects of social life, how these are brought together and the implications of such associations. Proponents fully acknowledge the materiality of the body - without espousing essentialist claims - by effacing the analytic division between agency and structure. I use the concept of corporeal transgression and the phenomenon of phantom limb to reveal how “immaterial” body parts became materially as well as socially substantive and to show how phantom limbs have been the force behind many transformations within the bodies and brains of amputees, as well as within the field of neuroscience.

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