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2014 - Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference Words: 714 words || 
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1. Davidson, Marcia. "Books that children CAN read: Book leveling and decodable books for ALL children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, Mar 10, 2014 <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p708546_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Introduction: One must consider the fact that most poor countries do not have books for children that are leveled appropriately according to difficulty. Many texts and government learning materials are arbitrarily assigned to classrooms based upon grade and standard levels that are appropriate for countries with much different contexts, and are not used effectively in the classrooms for which they were intended. As a result, children are not learning to read. Because most learning materials are not accessible to children, the task becomes one of creating new text or significantly modifying extant texts using guidelines that address both word meanings as well as spellings. Which words are the easiest to read and are also familiar to children? How can we determine what constitutes progressively more difficult text levels for children as they develop reading skills in many countries and languages?
Objectives:
1. To provide participants with current information on the need for accessible texts for all children in the primary grades.
2. To define decodable text and leveled text and their unique and important contributions to reading acquisition.
3. To provide participants with examples of leveled texts and decodable texts in national languages from countries in Asia and engage in an activity to learn more about how to level text and create decodable texts.
4. To propose specific globally applicable procedures for 1)developing decodable texts, 2) creating a leveling system for existing basic education texts, and 3) creating texts at the targeted levels.
Purpose and Research Design: This session will establish the need for providing books for children in basic education in poor countries that they CAN read. First, we will define decodable text based upon current research, its role in beginning reading, and how to develop useful decodable text. Second, we will define leveled texts using evidence from current research, consider how these texts can be used in classrooms, and procedures for leveling texts and for creating leveled texts for classrooms. The goal is to create a simple framework for matching texts to readers in multiple languages in countries that may not have many children’s texts and no valid readability formulas developed for the local languages in which reading is taught .

The two sets of recommendations, for creating decodable texts, and for leveling existing texts and creating leveled texts are intended to provide guidance to governments, NGOs and others in creating and categorizing books at an appropriate difficulty level for children in the primary grades. The recommendations on effective procedures for creating decodable stories and for leveling books that can be easily integrated into an early grade reading instructional program will be as universally applicable as possible, but their validity will require field testing and rigorous research in the countries in which these procedures are applied. Examples from several countries will be presented and participants will engage in an activity on leveling books during the session.
Evidence and Conclusions: Increasing the quantity of high quality books that children in the early grades can read is a challenge throughout the developing world. Publishers, printers, the government, local communities, and international donor partners need to consider that books created on Western assumptions of book difficulty are mostly too difficult and remain inaccessible to the children for whom they were intended. Education on how to remedy this situation must include global partners, digital texts, and careful procedures for producing books at the right level of difficulty in the language of instruction in every country.
Significance of the paper: Developing new systems for creating and providing books that reflect levels of difficulty of reading and learning materials for young children that can be accessed by children beginning in the first year of primary school is directly tied to the goal of All Children Reading. Currently, countries struggle with curriculum content that cannot be accessed by children due to high difficulty levels, and thus, the students miss opportunities to experience the thrill of reading and to develop the motivation to continue reading, thereby increasing reading proficiency. Available accessible reading materials are essential to all children who are learning to read and the global community must address the lack of appropriate, accessible, and some would say ‘considerate’ reading and learning materials that currently exist in so many classrooms worldwide.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7108 words || 
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2. Stevens, J.. and Bell, Christopher. "What Makes a Comic Book a Comic Book? Examining the Attitudes of Comic Book Store Patrons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p554172_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As digital comic book consumption continues to rise in popularity, the comic book community appears conflicted over the effects digital scans have on the meaning of collecting and reading comic books. Historically, comic ownership served as the locus of comic fan social capital; will digital scans hold the same cultural capital as printed books? And does post-purchased digital scan dissemination primarily hurt copyright holders through lost sales, or does it help through social promotion?
Building upon an analysis of fan attitudes towards digital comic book texts (Stevens and Bell, 2011), this project seeks to account for the limitations of locality by surveying the attitudes of comic book store patrons concerning their attitudes towards physical and digital comic book texts.

2012 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 1928 words || 
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3. Kurumada, Katie., Mays, Lydia., Dangel, Julie., Meyers, Barbara., Hart, Lynn. and Schafer, Nancy. "What Book Are You Reading?: Experiences of a Department-Wide Book Study on English Language Learners" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Riverwalk Hotel, San Antonio, Texas, Feb 11, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p524179_index.html>
Publication Type: Single Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This interactive, multimodal, presentation will share the experiences of an Early Childhood Education faculty as they engaged in professional development around English Language Learners. One particular activity, a book study, will be shared using Brofenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory (Bronfenbrenner, 1979) and Gloria Ladson-Billings' (1997; 2005) Culturally Relevant Pedagogy Framework.

2015 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 145 words || 
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4. Münch, Birgit Ulrike. "Don't Judge a Book by Its Cover: Feyerabend’s Neue Künstlichen Figuren between Religious Faith, Artist's Books, and Premodern Business Plans" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p929151_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: After being an apprentice and wandering journeyman in Italy, Sigmund Feyerabend came to Frankfurt in the late 1550s and founded the Companei, one of the most distinguished pre-modern publishing houses. An early project was a completely new business idea: Besides the regular bible-prints, Feyerabend edited the biblical woodcuts of renowned artists as Virgil Solis and Jost Amman separately with short descriptions in poetry or prose: the Neuen Künstlichen Figuren. These Figurenbände were published in several editions and were often interpreted as a new book type that conformed to Luther´suggestion of creating bibles for laypersons. All Figurenbände contain a detailed preface where the editor explains his ambitions. Earlier research has not examined these, although they characterize the Künstlichen Figuren as a book for painters who could not afford the expensive bibles. The paper explores function and readership of the Figurenbände between religious and merely economic purpose.

2017 - ASEH Annual Conference Words: 287 words || 
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5. Norrick-Rühl, Corinna. and Vogel, Anke. "Greening the Book Industry – or Greenwashing the Book Industry?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASEH Annual Conference, Drake Hotel, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-09-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1169615_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Greening the book industry is a large-scale task. This paper considers different perspectives on green publishing, using Germany and the German book industry – one of the largest and most productive book industries in the world, and a pioneer in the area of eco-friendly printing and publishing – as a case study. Building upon the historical background discussed in the first two papers of this panel, our paper gives a brief theoretical overview on the media and the history of the environmental movement. It then discusses developments such as the German initiative “Nachhaltig Publizieren” (“Green Publishing”), which is (very roughly) comparable to the US “Green Press Initiative”. Founded in 2011 by the publisher Oekom, the project was originally conceived of as a catalyst for the green publishing movement in Germany. Yet it seems to have lost momentum and arguably has failed to raise the awareness needed to establish green(er) publishing practices in an industry that is struggling. How can standards for green(er) publishing be established – how can greenwashing be avoided or recognized? Which publishers – for which content – truly fulfill green publishing standards? Can they be implemented industry-wide or will the phenomenon remain in a certain niche, associated with green content (environmental fiction, children’s books about nature, alternative travel guides, etc.)? What role do the consumers (readers) play in this process?
It remains to be seen whether supply or demand will be the driving force in the greening of a traditionally conservative cultural industry. This paper discusses these questions on the basis of historical sources from trade magazines and contemporary international trade events such as Frankfurt Book Fair and Drupa Print Media Fair and presents new findings from a survey among German publishers and readers.

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