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Showing 1 through 5 of 52 records.
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2013 - RSA Annual Meeting Words: 149 words || 
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1. Sikkink, Lisa. "Out with the Old Boss, In with the New Boss: Magic and Science in Godwin’s The Man in the Moone" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the RSA Annual Meeting, Sheraton Hotel and Marina, San Diego, CA, Apr 04, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p603400_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: By juxtaposing folk legends and magic against the new sciences of the seventeenth century in The Man in the Moone, Francis Godwin allows superstitious readers to be introduced to the sciences in the context of the magical ideas with which they are more familiar. The text places superstitions alongside the sciences to highlight the silliness of the superstitions and the seriousness of the sciences so that readers can accept the sciences in their own ways and draw their own conclusions about the relationship between science and magic. The close proximity of superstition and magic to science in science fiction eases the transition from ignorance to enlightenment by giving readers hope that some magic might still exist since science cannot yet explain everything, as well as subtly suggesting the strength of science over the impossibility of magic, thus allowing readers to begin to let superstition fall by the wayside.

2010 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6773 words || 
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2. Harlow, Summer. "A Political Boss and the Press: The Impact on Democracy of Two Brazilian Newspapers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, The Denver Sheraton, Denver, CO, Aug 04, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433868_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: When Brazil’s president was implicated in a bribery scandal in 2005, Antônio Carlos
Magalhães, a long-time senator in Brazil’s Northeast state of Bahia, emerged as one of
the president’s most vocal critics. A content analysis of scandal coverage in two Bahia
newspapers – one of which Magalhães owned – showed that Magalhães’ newspaper
succumbed to owner influence, excluding citizens’ voices as it covered the senator more
extensively and favorably than did the competing newspaper.

2008 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 203 words || 
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3. Kaletta, Barbara. "“Social Recognition, Identity Crises, and School Shooting in Germany: An Analysis of Internet Entries of Sebastian Bosse”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, St. Louis Adam's Mark, St. Louis, Missouri, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p262076_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper formulates and assesses an explanation of school shootings that directs attention to the processes of denied social recognition and resulting identity crises. I argue that juveniles who commit school shootings have failed to progress through the normal stages of adult identity construction because of feelings of not being recognized and respected. I further propose that this failure mainly derives from interactions at school with teachers and peers. The identity crises generate feelings of powerlessness, weakness, hopelessness and societal exclusion. A school shooting fulfils several functions for the perpetrator. First, it compensates for feelings of powerlessness, weakness, and helplessness when the adolescent ‘plays’ being a masculine offender who can decide who lives and who dies. Second, the anticipated attention by the media after a shooting may serve as a post mortem recognition which compensates for feelings of not being recognized when alive. Third, the identification with former shooters may create a feeling of belonging to a fantasized violent subculture. I evaluate the utility of this theoretical account through an analysis of internet entries (videos, suicide note and internet diary) which were made by an 18 year old German student, Sebastian Bosse, who committed a school shooting in November 2006.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Schieman, Scott. and Narisada, Atsushi. "Under-rewarded Boss: Gender, Workplace Power, and the Distress of Perceived Pay Inequity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1122458_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What happens when the boss feels under-rewarded? The relationship between perceived pay inequity and distress depends on a complex intersection of job authority and income—and differences between women and men further complicate the narrative. Using data from the 2005 Work, Stress, and Health study (N = 1,476), we observe that job authority, income, and gender interact to modify the distress of under-reward. We examine anger and anxious malaise as two forms of distress. Among male managers, lower earnings exacerbate the anger associated with severe underpayment—but higher earnings have a protective function. Among female managers, the patterns are strikingly different: Levels of anger are highest among female managers who feel severely underpaid—and higher earnings exacerbate the pattern. The difference between higher earning male and female managers is dramatic: Among managers who feel underpaid, women average about 3.5 days per week of anger index compared to men’s one day per week of anger. Similar patterns are observed between male and female managers when we consider anxious malaise as the outcome. Importantly, these differences hold net of adjustments for the gender composition of the workplace role-set (e.g., superiors, subordinates), the gender composition of the occupation, and stress exposures (e.g., conflict at work, work-nonwork interference, time pressure). Collectively, our findings speak diverse social-psychological theoretical traditions related to distributive justice, status structures, expectations, and legitimacy. Moreover, our efforts dovetail with (and informed by) recent interest in the sociology of mental health about the gendered implications of the status-power nexus and emotional well-being.

2018 - 89th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 150 words || 
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5. Wong, Stan. and Zeng, Yu. "When Your Boss Is Out: The Impact of Severing Factional Ties on Cadre Performance in China" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 89th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1344371_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Some scholars attribute China's rapid economic growth to a cadre promotion system that values economic performance. Others argue that political promotion in China hinges on factionalism. Empirical studies that engage in this debate often assume that performance can be measured independently from the effect of factionalism. In this article, we argue that factional ties have important influences on cadres' performance; in the absence of factional ties to higher officials cadres face greater performance pressure. In other words, performance and connections are likely substitutes. Our empirical analysis is based on a simple design: we examine the economic performance of prefecture-level cities before and after the change of provincial party secretaries. We find an immediate increase in the growth rates of prefecture GDP and government revenue in the year after the departure of former party secretaries. The growth enhancing effect, however, lasts only for two years on average.

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