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2004 - American Political Science Association Pages: 80 pages || Words: 5022 words || 
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1. McCallum, Heather. "Supports for Low-Income Families: States Serve a Broad Range of Families Through a Complex and Changing System" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hilton Chicago and the Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Sep 02, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p60368_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the last decade, the Congress has made significant changes in numerous federal programs that support low-income families, including changes that have shifted program emphases from providing cash assistance to providing services that promote employment and economic independence. As a result of some of the federal policy changes, the support system is more decentralized than before. This heightens the importance of understanding policy choices and practices at the state and local levels as well as those at the federal level. To provide the Congress with information on this system, GAO agreed to address the following questions: (1) To what extent do states provide supports for lowincome families? (2) How have states structured programs to support low-income families? (3) What changes have states made to supports for low-income families in recent years? Our review focused primarily on supports for which states make many of the key decisions about eligibility, benefit amounts, and service provision. To obtain this information, GAO conducted a mail survey of the social service directors in the 50 states and the District of Columbia; conducted site visits in New York, North Carolina, Oklahoma, Washington, and Wisconsin; and reviewed federal reports and other relevant literature.

States use an array of federal and state funds to provide a wide range of benefits and services that can support the work efforts of low-income families, although the types of supports and coverage of the eligible population vary among the states and sometimes within states. For instance, most states subsidize several types of child care, subsidize use of public transportation, and offer employment services in at least one location in the state, but somewhat fewer states subsidize child care for sick children, assist with the purchase of used cars, or offer employment retention bonuses to parents who find and maintain jobs. The five states we visited structured the eligibility criteria and benefits of many supports in ways that allow them to serve a broad range of low-income families, including families on and off welfare and families who are working and those who are not currently working. The specific support structures vary, however, by state and type of support. These differences create a complex national picture of supports that provide an assortment of benefits and services to a range of populations. Over the last several years, many states have expanded the availability of supports that promote employment and economic independence for lowincome families. State officials reported that both the number of support services available and the number of recipients have increased. However, state officials express uncertainty about their continued ability to provide this level of support. As states plan for the future of supports in the current state fiscal environment, officials reported that they are considering changes that could limit the availability and provision of supports for low-income families. Overall, it its probable that the support system will continue to change as the federal and state governments further amend policies and respond to changes in the demand for services and cyclical fiscal conditions.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 20 pages || Words: 5988 words || 
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2. Lange, Matthew. and Balian, Hrag. "States and Civil Unrest: A Statistical Test of the Effects of State Structure on Broad-Based Domestic Violence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103063_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Several analyses suggest that states affect the likelihood of broad-based domestic violence. Such claims, however, are often competing. Some propose that direct forms of state domination incite nationalist rebellions by reducing local autonomy, while others suggest that direct forms of rule promote high levels of state capacity and thereby limit the possibility of domestic violence. Unfortunately, the form of state structures has proved difficult to measure historically, and the question of whether and how states affect domestic violence remains unresolved. In the present paper, we attempt to expand insight into this question. We operationalize the extent to which state structures are either direct or indirect among a set of 35 former British colonies and show that this measurement is also an excellent historical proxy for the level of state effectiveness. Using multivariate models that control for other factors, we regress this variable on the intensity of communal conflict, the intensity of domestic rebellion, and the prevalence of civil war between 1960 and 2000. We find that the structure of states has no significant effect on the dependent variables, suggesting either that states have no effect on domestic violence or that states have competing effects that cancel out one another.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7573 words || 
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3. Knoll, Benjamin. "America for Americans: A Broad Look at the Determinants of Nativism in the American Public" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362190_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: There is a growing body of research investigating the determinants and effects of the policy manifestations of nativist attitudes in the American political environment, i.e. immigration policy, English-only laws, border security, etc. As of yet, however, there has been little quantitative research investigating the determinants of the more general attitude of “nativism”, i.e. the opinion that the United States needs to be protected from foreign influence, broadly speaking. This study will outline a theoretical concept of nativism and how it might differ from attitudes regarding its policy manifestations. Using a multivariate analysis of public opinion survey data, this study will then analyze and discuss the determinants of nativist attitudes in the American public. I will also discuss implications for the current political debate over the degree and effect of foreign influence in American culture.

2010 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 13902 words || 
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4. Ingle, William. and Petroff, Ruth. "Incentivizing K-12 student performance: The adoption of broad-based merit aid in four states" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Oct 28, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435262_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This qualitative study considered the role that state scholarship programs in four states (Alaska, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Nevada) played in incentivizing K-12 student performance. Low college going rates motivated policymakers in Alaska and Nevada. In Massachusetts and Michigan, strengthening their K-12 accountability systems motivated policymakers. Policymakers hoped that residents on scholarship would remain in-state after graduation, contributing to their state’s workforce and overall economic development.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 13010 words || 
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5. Myrick, Amy. "U.S. Constitutional Amendment Activism in the Progressive Era: The Problem of Broad Substance and Narrow Text" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722474_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: What happens to its political agenda when a popular movement develops normative values about the medium of text itself? My dissertation, the source of this paper (which I’m adapting from a chapter), analyzes patterns in U.S. constitutional amendment activism to understand why beliefs about words come to collide with visions for sociopolitical change. It examines specific combinations of “textual norms” – values about how words should work - and substantive goals in each of four historical periods, showing how they emerge and their consequences going forward. It concludes that movements valuing “technical” text cannot sustain advocacy for collective social reform, while those valuing “literal” text can effectively promote personal liberties, and a normative commitment to “ambiguous” text is politically problematic. It demonstrates that values about text are part of political culture, and, by showing that institutions create these textual norms, reconciles cultural theory and institutionalism in a new way.
The draft paper here deals with the Progressive Era, 1900 to 1925, tracing the development of “textual technicalism” – the textual norm from these years. I use my unique data set to present a complete account of all constitutional amendments introduced in Congress for these decades, and then provide qualitative detail from congressional hearings to show how Progressives thought about text. It’s an early draft and will be much more developed (and paper-like) by ASA.

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