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2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 33 pages || Words: 9669 words || 
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1. Storr, Juliette. "Reflections on the Past, Questions of the Future--Public Service Broadcasting: A Case Study of The Bahamas Broadcasting System," Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p111594_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The broadcasting history of The Bahamas parallels the history and development of the country. The British introduced broadcasting to the colony in 1937. It was based on the British public service model. When The Bahamas dismantled colonization with independence from Britain in 1973, the broadcasting system retained the structure that was left by the British. From its inception broadcasting was state-owned, a condition that remained in effect until 1993. Throughout its seventy-two years of history, broadcasting in The Bahamas has faced numerous changes and challenges. Today, perhaps its greatest challenge is staying economically viable and aesthetically appealing to local audiences. This article examines four significant periods of growth in the history and development of broadcasting in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas from its inception in 1930 to the beginning of private commercial radio broadcasting in 1993.

2003 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8803 words || 
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2. Blevins, Jeffrey. and Brown, Duncan. "Broadcast Ownership Regulation in a Border Era: An Analysis of how the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is Shaping the Debate on Broadcast Ownership Limits" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott Hotel, San Diego, CA, May 27, 2003 Online <.PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p112136_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines the way the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is approaching its review of broadcast ownership regulations. We focus our analysis on how the twelve studies the FCC used in its review focus predominantly on economic aspects of the issue. This is troubling because it appears that the notion of the “public interest” may be relegated to questions regarding market efficiencies in this debate, as well as future policymaking decisions.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 9617 words || 
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3. Ali, Christopher. "A Broadcast System in Whose Interest? Tracing the Origins of Broadcast Localism in Canadian and Australian Television Policy, 1950-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p491673_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The broadcast systems of Canada and Australia are often assumed to be similar if not synonymous. Both are dominated by American imports; rely on a networking of stations; and trace their media systems to a combination of American and British influence. Moreover, in the past decade, both have implemented tremendous changes to their broadcast policies, particularly with regards to local television. Yet despite these similarities, scholars have never critically reflected on the evolution of these countries’ local television policies. As such, this paper concentrates on the ways in which Canada and Australia have historically framed, defined, and implemented the concept of localism in broadcast policy. Through an analysis of documents from 1950-1963, the argument is made that when compared with Australia, localism was not an immediate priority, but rather a taken-for-granted assumption by Canadian policy-makers. Thus, the nationalism debate in Canadian television was fought at the expense of the local

2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 29 pages || Words: 8489 words || 
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4. Vos, Timothy. "Professionalism, Voluntarism, and American Broadcast Networks: A Cultural Explanation for Broadcast Policy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Jun 16, 2006 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p91019_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explores the theoretical, methodological, and empirical challenges that come with forging a cultural explanation for a particular policy outcome. By theorizing culture as a tool kit of discrete values, two specific cultural values were explored for their role in bounding the agency of various actors in constructing broadcast policy and regulation that favored broadcast networks. The study challenges realist stories that explain policy or regulatory outcomes based on the power of particular interests.

2007 - International Communication Association Pages: 24 pages || Words: 5562 words || 
Info
5. Park, Namsu. "Challenge of the Public Service Broadcasting to New Media Era: The Case of Korean Broadcasting System (KBS)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, San Francisco, CA, May 24, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p171359_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: As new media technologies have come into the marketplace of broadcasting, the broadcasting environment has become more tremendously competitive than ever. With the increased number of channels that digital television provides, it can be difficult for a public service broadcaster to survive amongst media systems which are commercialized in many countries around the world. Based on the case study of the Korean Broadcasting System (KBS), this study articulates the legitimacy of public service broadcasting in the new media age. The question of whether public broadcasting should be sustained and protected is at the heart of current media policy debates in Korea. With some examples of public broadcasting systems in European countries, this study examines the current status of Korean broadcasting policy for the KBS and suggests recommendations of new regulatory frames to accommodate the public broadcaster, KBS with the new digital broadcasting era.

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