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2017 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 452 words || 
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1. Brown, Elizabeth. "To Call You Out, To Call Out You: Claudia Rankine's Decolonial Reading Lesson" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Hyatt Regency Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, Nov 08, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1261498_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In her award winning Citizen: An American Lyric (2014), Claudia Rankine departs from the lyric genre’s conventional first-person “I” mode of address by privileging the standpoint of a second-person “you.” Sometimes this “you” appears in the text to make a direct address to the audience, but more often it moves ambiguously between addressing specific selves with specific memories and a general third-person point of view. Slipping between these modes of address, Citizen’s “you” rarely transforms into the self-possessed “I” characteristic of lyric poetry. Instead, it circles around the construction of the lyric-I, appearing to remain caught within its grammatical summons. This paper argues that Citizen exposes how the subject position symbolized by the conventional lyric-I has been forged as part of a grammar of citizenship with epistemological roots in New World slavery. Indeed, its use of the “you” mode of address offers a decolonial reading lesson that forces readers to confront how the lyric-I has historically appealed to a racialized feeling of (white) citizen subjecthood. Far from bearing significance for the literature classroom alone, Citizen’s reading lesson intervenes in reading practices widely institutionalized within the administration of U.S. higher education. It clarifies in particular how universities have criminalized the speech of faculty and students working to decolonize higher education by racializing their speech as “uncivil,” or as betraying feelings antithetical to academic citizenship.

In his 1833 essay “What is Poetry?,” British imperialist and liberal philosopher John Stuart Mill distinguished poetry from other forms of speech through the poetic speaker’s public performance of ostensibly private feelings associated with civilized culture. The lyric-I of the poem thus symbolized for Mill a modern rational subject distinct from the over-emotionalism he believed to be characteristic of “rude,” “childlike” social orders. Readers’ appropriate emotional response to lyrical poetry likewise marked their belonging within civilized culture and thus their qualification for modern citizenship. Citizen demonstrates how the affective regulation associated with the lyric has reverberated within contemporary official responses to black anger. The text’s exposition of sanctions against tennis player Serena Williams, for instance, demonstrates how black anger has been criminalized as an uncivil response to institutionalized racial injustice. I use Citizen’s grammatical intervention in the lyric’s conventional first-person mode of address as a means to analyze how universities have racialized the speech of student activists working in alignment with Black Lives Matter as uncivil. In public cases made against activists, student demands of universities are often read as betraying an angry and immature over-emotionalism with the potential to threaten institutional commitments to liberal values of “diversity,” “tolerance,” and “pluralism.” I suggest that in “call[ing] out you” Citizen issues a provocation to reimagine activist student anger as a type of rationality with the potential to transform the university.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 259 words || 
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2. Kawashima, Ken. "The “Fold” of Commodification and State Racism: On So-Called Primitive Accumulation and the So-Called “Korean Problem” in Imperial Japan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1196483_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: My paper argues that the so-called “Korean Problem” in Imperial Japan - as a discourse of state unemployment in the era of imperialist rivalry and chronic recession - is a “symptom” of the problem of capitalism’s historical origins in Japan and Korea. Addressing these violent origins, Marx critiqued classical political economy’s hypocrisy by drawing attention to the state’s role in “so-called Primitive Accumulation.” In my paper, I address the problem of primitive accumulation in Japan during the Meiji period, as well as colonial Korea during the 1920s and 1930s. For what primitive accumulation as a concept begs is not only how it functions as the place of exception on the twisted logical plane of capital’s circulation, but also as a conjunctural space between national economies developing capitalist relations of production at different periods. What happens with mass expropriation in the countryside in colonial Korea when it collides with a labour market in Japan that is itself undergoing post-WWI industrial recession? From this perspective, the “Korean Problem” reveals itself as nothing but an ideological obfuscation of the crisis of capitalism in interwar Japan and colonial Korea. I argue that the ongoing questions of state racism, which represent the Other as a national threat, especially when capital’s circuits are broken, cannot be answered unless the institutional zone between expropriation and exploitation is laid bare. For this reason, we must also return to the problem of so-called primitive accumulation as it unfolded not simply in Japan, but in a Japan that was hurtling towards state suicide in the stage of imperialism.

2009 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 501 words || 
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3. Desai, Manan. "They Called You Negro, They Called Me Untouchable: Translating America in Dalit Literary Criticism, 1965-78" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Renaissance Hotel, Washington D.C., Nov 05, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p318617_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 1965, M.N. Wankhade, an Indian graduate student from Maharashtra, completed his Ph.D. dissertation “Walt Whitman and Tantrism” at the University of Florida. Wankhade was Dalit, or what was then commonly termed as “Untouchable,” an identity reflective of the stigmatized labor that defined his community under the Indian caste system. Returning to Maharashtra that year to teach at Milind College, he, alongside several colleagues, cofounded a literary journal titled Asmitadarsh (Mirror of Identity), which spearheaded the nascent Dalit literary movement. Yet rather than outline what a field of Dalit literature could look like, Wankhade’s first contribution to the journal was an essay titled “American Negro Literature,” an index of African American representations from the minstrel shows of Thomas Rice to the militant voice of the Black Arts Movement. Months later his student, the Dalit critic Janardhan Waghmare, published a series of essays in Asmitadarsh on African American literature and culture. In following years allusions to Black America began to surface regularly in Dalit poetry, autobiographies, and even in an influential political organization that called itself the “Dalit Panther.” Issuing a manifesto in 1973, the group’s founder Namdeo Dhasal wrote, “From the Black Panthers, Black Power emerged. The fire of the struggles has thrown out sparks into the country. We claim a close relationship with this struggle.”

In this paper, I examine the role that American literature played in M.N. Wankhade’s cultural criticism, from his early writings on the metaphysical humanism of Whitman and the Beats to his later writings on Black Arts writers like Gil Scott-Heron and Don L. Lee. Taking a cue from Wahneema Lubiano’s critical assessment of the Black Arts Movement, I argue that like Black aesthetic criticism, Dalit literary criticism was enmeshed in creating new terms of citizenship and contesting “state manufactured subjectivity” and its “totalizing production of public consciousness.” Debates over the Black aesthetic exposed the contradictions of liberal political thought by destabilizing the universal citizen-subject of the state through its emphasis on Black particularity. Similarly, Wankhade’s dissemination of “the black American past, present, future” and the sign of Blackness, provided Dalit writers with a framework to re-imagine the Dalit subject outside of the totalizing discourse of the newly decolonized Indian nation-state. Wankhade’s construction of a racialized America, one defined by what he termed as “cultural dualism,” was certainly developed from his close readings of African American texts, but this construction was also uniquely shaped to fit the Indian context at the site of translation from English to Marathi. Whereas African American intellectuals from Du Bois to Wright had drawn the “color line” between White America and its African American population as analogous to the British Empire and its colonized subjects, Wankhade transposed that line within the postcolonial Indian nation-state itself. In this way, the paper examines the unique social imaginaries that exist outside of the nation-state, and the practices of translation, both cultural and literal, that allowed them to come into being.

2004 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 297 words || 
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4. Link, Michael. and Mokdad, Ali. "Responding to the National Do Not Call Registry: Evaluation of Call Attempt Protocol Changes in the BRFSS" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs, Phoenix, Arizona, May 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p115869_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: By the end of the initial registration period (August 31, 2003), the National Do Not Call Registry contained more than 50 million telephone numbers and that number continues to grow. The Registry was designed to address public concerns about unsolicited marketing calls and currently focuses on a specific segment of the call center industry. Although social science surveys are exempt from the “do not call” requirements, the saliency of the list in the public mind will have a ripple effect on these efforts. This may manifest as confusion on the part of sample members regarding the exempt status of survey organizations or as a future movement to have such organizations included under these rules. Additionally, some exempt organizations may choose to voluntarily abide by the Registry’s rules in acquiescence to the perceived public desires for fewer calls. For on-going data collection efforts, such as the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), changes in protocols – such as reducing calls to households on the DNC Registry or removing these sampled numbers all together – need to be evaluated thoroughly before such actions are undertaken. Due diligence is essential for ensuring the quality of these data, which are used extensively by state and federal health programs to monitor public health. If call protocol modifications do not introduce significant changes in response rates or estimates obtained, then voluntary compliance with the rules of the registry could be recommended to the states conducting the BRFSS. This evaluation examines the impact on participation rates and BRFSS estimates when the standard number of call attempts is reduced to households on the DNC Registry and when these numbers are pulled from the sample altogether. Data come from more than 165,000 sampled households in the 54 states and territories conducting the BRFSS in September 2003.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4515 words || 
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5. Raymond, Geoffrey. and Zimmerman, Don. "Closing Matters II: Project Completion and Call Closings in Mundane Telephone Calls" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-07-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726159_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Schegloff and Sacks (1973) identify -- as a technical problem -- how parties engaged in a conversation bring it to a close and describe some methods any such participants can use to effect that outcome. This paper extends their findings in two ways: First, using as data mundane telephone calls in which some business or "reason-for-the-call" is conducted we focus on the co-ordination, and mutual relevance, of participant's effort in to manage two forms of unit completion -- sequence closing (as a method for “project” completion) and concluding the occasion in which the project was pursued (in this case via closings in telephone calls). As we show, the intersection of sequence and call closing constitute one important location in which "scores are settled", and thus how events within an interaction shape the relations, if any, participants establish beyond it. Second, the account we provide differentiates between alternative occasions for closing conversations enabling us to consider whether (and how) the canonical method S&S identify can be better understood as context-specific method for closing encounters that is sensitive to the status of the parties relations (beyond the occasion of the call itself). These advances illustrate how closings matter: how they inexorably demand that the participants arrive at some alignment -- or make visible their failure to do so -- regarding the project or projects pursued in it, the status of that those project(s), and thus who, as a consequence, the parties are (or could have been) for another i.e., their “identities.”

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