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Showing 1 through 5 of 3,334 records.
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2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5038 words || 
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1. Park, Hyung. "Sharing the Campaign Roles: Comparison Official E-mail Campaign and On-Line Activists’ E-mail campaign (Case study of 2004 Presidential Election)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41707_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: E-mail emerged not only as a major communication device but also as a new campaign tool in recent years. Due to its easy and low operating cost, major parties and candidates do not monopolize e-mail campaign. On-line activist groups take an advantage of e-mail campaign for their election goals. John Kerry’s official e-mail campaign targeted not only democrats but also moderates and independents. Thus they have some restrictions in selecting words and attacking opponent. On-line activist, on the other hand, have much more specific targeted (more liberals in moveon.org’s case). Thus On-line activists have less restriction to attack their opponents. John Kerry was able to send less negative message due to his attack dog: moveon.org.

2004 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 181 words || 
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2. Winneg, Kenneth. "The Internet as a Means for Campaign Discourse: Its Uses in the 2000 and 2004 Presidential Campaigns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs, Phoenix, Arizona, May 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p115908_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the 2004 presidential campaign, the Internet has been used as a primary fund-raising tool and as a grass-roots campaign building mechanism. This research examines two main areas. First, it looks at how people used the Internet as a means of campaign learning from the early primary campaign season (Oct., 2003)through Super Tuesday, when John Kerry just about wrapped up the Democratic nomination. Second, we examine how the Internet has functioned in the 2004 primary season as a place for citizens to participate in and exchange ideas about the presidential campaign with the advent of the candidate and news blogs. Using data from the 2004 National Annenberg Election Survey, this paper will address these issues and in doing so will answer the following additional questions:

•Who are the people that go online to discuss politics?

•How are voters using the Internet to learn about and participate in the presidential campaign.

•Which candidates have benefited most?

•What are the implications going into the 2004 general election and beyond?

•What is the role of the Internet relative to other means of campaign participation?

2002 - American Political Science Association Pages: 23 pages || Words: 5308 words || 
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3. Brox, Brian. "Candidate Campaign Organizational Strength and Campaign Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Boston Marriott Copley Place, Sheraton Boston & Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2002 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p66216_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent scholarship on American political campaigns has been split as to whether campaigns have effects or whether campaign outcomes can be explained by other, noncampaign variables. For those who argue that presidential campaigns have effects, research has largely focused on the impact of television advertisements or campaign events such as conventions or debates. Scholars generally acknowledge that campaigns have effects in races for offices other than the presidency, but most research considers campaign spending as the only factor that accounts for the efforts of the campaign.
This research looks at another factor that exerts influence on campaign outcomes ? the campaign organization. Adapting the concept of party organizational strength for use with candidate campaign organizations, I use data from the Campaign Finance Analysis Project to derive a measure of campaign organizational strength for campaigns for the US House of Representatives in 2000. After a descriptive analysis of Congressional campaign organizational strength in 2000, I match the organizational strength measures with aggregate and individual level data to test for campaign effects. The results of these two analyses suggest that stronger campaigns do have an impact on both aggregate vote totals as well as individual vote choice.

2008 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 388 words || 
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4. austin, roger. "Government in the Sunshine, Campaigns in the Dark - The Failure of Campaign Finance Reform" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 09, 2008 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229021_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Abstract – Campaign finance reform was one of the enduring issues of the 20th century, and in the early years of the 21st century, shows no signs of abating. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Tillman Act, the first campaign finance reform legislation passed by Congress. This early attempt at campaign finance reform began a pattern of failure that has marked virtually every such effort throughout the century, culminating in the Bipartisan Campaign Finance Act of 2002.

The history of campaign finance reform shows that every attempt to control the flow of money has failed. In fact, many who voted for BCRA were hard at work ensuring that the flow of campaign funds continued, albeit in other directions and to different entities and often without disclosure.

Given 100 years of failed reforms, it is long past time to ask, “What Went Wrong?” The answer is both quite simple and counterintuitive. First, the problem of financing campaigns has been completely misdiagnosed – the corrupting influence is power, not money. Second, the misdiagnosis (i.e., the exclusive focus on money) has led to an improper prescription and a near fatal overdose of regulation. The modern campaign finance regulatory system is held up by two pillars – the laws regarding disclosure and the laws and regulations regarding contributions, expenditures, coordination, etc. The misdiagnosis has been compounded because these two pillars of regulation are not only not complimentary, but actually work at cross-purposes with one another; disclosure is undermined by the other regulations.

(Two explanatory paragraphs omitted here due to space)

The simple inescapable conclusion is that campaign finance regulatory schemes have not only failed but they are working at cross purposes to the disclosure laws. Essentially, we have overmedicated the patient. Doctors over prescribing medication are guilty of malpractice and patients who overmedicate are called addicts. However, the government that over-regulates and the candidate who overdoses are almost expected.

In this paper, I argue that it is results that matter, not good intentions or fashionable regulatory schemes. How do we assure that our political campaigns are as open to public scrutiny as is the government to which we elect candidates for public office? Until we solve this puzzle, we will continue to have government in the sunshine, but campaigns in the dark.

2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 7814 words || 
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5. Gimpel, James. "Prospecting for Campaign Gold: Predicting the Spatial Distribution of Campaign Contributions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 20, 2006 <Not Available>. 2018-10-15 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p137560_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Campaigns and political parties are faced with the immensely important practical challenge of financing their efforts. Raising money is instrumental to all other aims. We also know from recent research that contributors flock together – that campaign contributing is a spatially dependent phenomenon, associated with affluence and the presence of networks. The field of geostatistics presents us with powerful spatial estimation tools that can be of great assistance in providing researchers with the capacity to predict where contributions can be most successfully mined. In this paper we implement two of these tools: kriging and cokriging, and assess their results. The cokriging model produces highly accurate predictions for our study area, and we conclude by commenting on the importance of recognizing that many participatory behaviors are geographically contingent occurrences.

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