Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 3,095 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 619 - Next  Jump:
2005 - American Political Science Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5038 words || 
Info
1. Park, Hyung. "Sharing the Campaign Roles: Comparison Official E-mail Campaign and On-Line Activists’ E-mail campaign (Case study of 2004 Presidential Election)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott Wardman Park, Omni Shoreham, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Sep 01, 2005 <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p41707_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: E-mail emerged not only as a major communication device but also as a new campaign tool in recent years. Due to its easy and low operating cost, major parties and candidates do not monopolize e-mail campaign. On-line activist groups take an advantage of e-mail campaign for their election goals. John Kerry’s official e-mail campaign targeted not only democrats but also moderates and independents. Thus they have some restrictions in selecting words and attacking opponent. On-line activist, on the other hand, have much more specific targeted (more liberals in moveon.org’s case). Thus On-line activists have less restriction to attack their opponents. John Kerry was able to send less negative message due to his attack dog: moveon.org.

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Rackaway, Chapman. "The Effect of Campaign Finance Laws on Campaign Spending in the States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152057_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
3. Sulkin, Tracy. "Do Quality Challengers Run Better Campaigns? The Impact of Experience on Campaign Discourse" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152326_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2006 - American Political Science Association Words: unavailable || 
Info
4. Ensley, Michael. "Do Campaigns Inform? Do Campaigns Persuade?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152377_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding

2008 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 146 words || 
Info
5. Sisco, Tauna. and Newcamp, Julie. "Political Ads and the Campaign Trail: Media Richness, Campaign War News Consumption and the Impact on Political Participation and Opinion" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2018-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p229195_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Drawing from media richness theory, certain forms of media, such as television, have greater informational impact on viewers and subsequent viewer cognitive information and action than other forms, such as newspapers. Through the use of the American National Election Survey Panel Study: 1990-1992, this longitudinal study examines two forms of media, newspaper and television, as well as war news to determine the influence on political opinion and voter participation. Results indicate that reading the newspaper or attention to campaign material in newspapers has no effect on subsequent political opinion, ideology, or turnout. Increased attention to television news campaign coverage yields a greater likelihood of voting as well as negative feelings about political leaders; however, too much attention to television campaigns creates media saturation level for voter participation and opinions about leaders, suggesting quality, not quantity is an important factor for political reasoning and action.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 619 - Next  Jump:

©2018 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy