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2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 173 words || 
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1. Grugan, Shannon. "Insiders, Outsiders, Neighborhood Context and Campus Police: A Qualitative Exploration of the Impact of Student Threat Perceptions and Resulting Perceptions of Campus Police on College and University Campuses" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1278556_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The nature, makeup, and overall context of a community or neighborhood can have a notable impact on issues of crime and justice in a given geographic location. However, not much is known about the unique nature of college campuses, which arguably are a specific type of community embedded within a larger separate community. This qualitative study of students at two public universities in the Northeastern United States, one located in a suburban town and one located in an urban city, documents student experiences with a variety of issues of crime and policing in these two different campus and community contexts. Students on both campuses were quick to differentiate between those who were part of the campus community as insiders and those from the larger town or city in which each respective campus is located as outsiders. The roles of both insiders and outsiders in regard to issues of crime, safety, and policing were perceived differently by students on the different campuses. These differences and the implications of them will be discussed.

2017 - Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 292 words || 
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2. Haddock, Shelley. and Weiler, Lindsey. "Campus Connections: A Campus-Community Initiative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1239068_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Campus Connections program at Colorado State University was developed in 2009 in response to a call by the local juvenile justice system for the development of preventive interventions that support the positive development of a growing number of disadvantaged and at-risk youth. In less than six years, Campus Connections has become a core service for vulnerable youth and the program is attracting national and international attention because of its high-quality and cost-efficient model that has a transformative effects on youth, students, and the community. As a university-community collaboration, Campus Connections is both a mentoring program for vulnerable youth and a university course for students who want to enhance their education while making a difference in the life of a young person. Campus Connections pairs youth in one-on-one mentoring relationships with undergraduate students, and provides an on-campus community setting and prosocial activities in which mentoring pairs develop meaningful relationships while receiving personalized and therapeutic support from family therapist instructors. As part of an intentional multi-level mentoring community, both youth and students demonstrate transformational growth as they participate in activities designed to promote the youths’ development and a sense of belonging to a purposeful community. In this win-win situation, the community also benefits as Campus Connections leverages the resources of the university to reduce the pressure on over-taxed human service agencies. This presentation will introduce Campus Connections and describe the journey of its initial development. This will include the community situation that prompted the call to action; the response from Colorado State University to develop an intervention that innovatively integrates best evidence-informed principles of effective youth mentoring, community psychology, family therapy and service-learning; and the rapid expansion that followed as a result of achieving positive outcomes for youth and students in Colorado.

2017 - Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 256 words || 
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3. Douglas, Jasmine., Aguila, Amanda. and Meissen, Greg. "The Importance of Community-Campus Partnerships When Developing a Campus Cessation Program" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Jun 21, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1238100_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Community partnerships are critical when developing policy for a tobacco-free campus and a comprehensive prevention and cessation initiative. Wichita State University implemented a new tobacco free policy, effective July 1, 2017 based on the work of a coalition led by the WSU Community Psychology PhD program which consisted of campus leaders, students, and community members. The coalition understood this new policy will affect tobacco users more than any other group as nicotine addiction is a difficult personal and health issue. With the collaboration of the county’s tobacco control coordinator, campus student health, and the WSU Counseling and Testing Center the coalition will be designing and implementing a campus-community prevention and cessation initiative. This poster will discuss the collaborative process between campus and community partners involved in the research and advocacy behind the new policy and the development of the prevention and cessation initiative which in part based on a campus wide needs assessment of students, faculty and staff. The random sample survey (n=215) of those who had used tobacco any time in their life found that 42.8% of participants still used tobacco products on a regular or semi-regular basis. The Smoker Typology Scale, which further classifies tobacco users in two groups, found that 48.9% of the users were social users and 44.5% were dependent users (Rosa & Aloise-Young, 2015). This study indicates that a prevention approach to social smokers along with comprehensive tobacco cessation services for those addicted to nicotine will be needed with different messages and approaches.

2011 - AASHE Words: 228 words || 
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4. Dockman, Lisa. and Innes, Trina. "Public Empowerment & Campus Sustainability - Meaningfully engaging your campus community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AASHE, D. L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 09, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521637_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Creating space for students, staff and faculty to collaborate is a powerful means of building a sustainable campus. The Deliberation on Campus Sustainability (DoCS) was a multi-phased, 5-month project that guided a diverse group of campus community members through the process of identifying campus sustainability priorities, co-creating recommendation for strategic planning and discovering action projects.

Participating in meaningful deliberation can have a transformative effect on individuals and communities. The DoCS project design was based on the theories of deliberative democracy – defined as a set of theories and practices that encourages informed discussion between participants on key issues facing their community, and empowers them to mutually reason and collectively create solutions.

As a collaborative project that engaged students, staff and faculty on sustainability issues facing the University of Alberta, the ultimate goal of DoCS was to craft recommendations to influence the campus sustainability plan using ideas that were representative of the values and concerns of the campus community.

DoCS, was a student-initiated venture heavily supported by the Office of Sustainability. It originated from a desire to see democratic processes used to engage the campus community on sustainability issues. A diverse and committed group of students, staff and faculty worked collaboratively via informed, fair, and democratic deliberations.
Join us to learn more about this innovative, complex and successful campus engagement project and how to leverage our learnings on your campus.

2011 - AASHE Words: 121 words || 
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5. Hopkins, Stephanie. "Designing An Edible Campus: Using the Charrette Framework to Create a Campus-Wide Initiative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AASHE, D. L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA, Oct 09, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p521352_index.html>
Publication Type: Briefing
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: During the spring of 2011, a three part design series entitled, “Designing An Edible Campus” was conducted using the framework outlined by the National Charrette Institute. Most commonly, a charrette consists of an intense period of collaborative design between stakeholders with the goal of creating a physical space that meets a wide range of needs. In this case, the charrette framework was used to encourage communication and cooperation between existing entities interested in food and sustainability as well as collectively design creative ways to incorporate food production into institutional structures and activities. This briefing will focus on the methods used to apply the charrette framework to the design of a campus-wide initiative as well as the successes associated with this process.

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