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2018 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 148 words || 
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1. Young, Gregory. "Selling Canada by the Can: National Identity as Marketing Campaign in the US and Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Bonaventure Hotel, Montreal, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1447339_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this study, I examine the portrayals and impacts of Canadian beer commercials as a lens for looking at how United States and Canada see each other and the binational relationship more broadly. Such an inquiry reveals the roles of American exceptionalism, provincialism, and the role of stereotypes in shaping common sense understandings of national identity and nationalism. Building from an imagined communities framework, this study specifically examines how Canadian beer commercials reflect larger recurring themes in national representation within popular culture. While the Molson Canadian television commercial entitled "The Rant" is an especially useful illumination of this paradigm, I focus primarily on more recent advertisements for Canadian beer that distort stereotypes while also reinforcing dominant national identities via a limited number of representational tropes. These commercials are simultaneously used domestically to bolster national pride domestically while also differentiating their product for American consumers.

2017 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 438 words || 
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2. Kim, Jeonghyeon. "Is Canada a Frontrunner in Refugee Crisis?:The Politics of Refugee in Canada" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, TBA, San Francisco, CA, Aug 31, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1256733_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We live in a time where the legitimate role of states in global refugee protection is highly contested. Over the years, international bodies have increasingly made legal agreements and adopted policies to regulate and restrain states practice toward the rights of its own people on human rights ground. However, the global refugee crisis raises an important moral question to the international community how to protect the right of strangers, the people who are outside their country of origin. The 1951 Convention and the 1967 Protocol relating to the Status of Refugees are the key legal documents that define and claim legitimate roles of states in protecting the right of global refugees. Despite the legal frameworks, states consistently violate the principle of non-refoulment and repatriate refugees to a homeland where they face persecution by using many political and economic excuses.

In particular, refugee policies in developed states are converging in order to keep refugees and asylum seekers out from their states (Gibney 2006; Pellerin 2008; Kneebone 2009; Hamlin 2014). If this trend were true, we would expect a continuous decline in refugee acceptance rate in all industrialized states at a similar level. However, there is some considerable variation in refugee policy outcome in the developed refugee host states. With an in-depth process tracing analysis and interviews gained from a field study, this paper examines the case of Canada, a country known for its humanitarian traditions and praised for its immigration policies. This paper traces ordinary Canadians and civil society actors’ political activities that pursuing legitimate domestic refugee policies complied with the international refugee protection norms; and how their actions changed the government and people’s perceptions toward the refugees in Canada.

In this paper, I argue that states are more willing to provide refugee protection if the human rights policy coincides with political or economic gains of policymakers or a state. If negative impacts of refugees on host states are expected, countries will be less likely to protect refugees. The case of Canada, however, teaches us that even if the costs of refugee policy is high, motivated ordinary citizens, civil society actors, and international organizations that are willing to share the burden of the government could encourage policymakers to become more risk acceptance, and that coupled with decision makers with strong human rights identity meaningfully improve the protection and well-being of refugees. Knowledge gained from the case study will inform the international community how to mediate social and political tension for states’ refugee policy implementation and redesign humanitarian and development programs for maximizing positive opportunities for refugees.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Hwang, Monica. "In Canada We Trust? Understanding Differences in Social and Political Trust among Canada’s Major Ethno-racial Groups" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-11-12 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350982_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The study explores ethno-racial differences in social and political trust among Canada's three most culturally distinctive groups: Visible Minorities, French Canadians, and Indigenous Peoples.

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