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Showing 1 through 5 of 2,628 records.
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2008 - APSA 2008 Annual Meeting Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6440 words || 
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1. Johansen, Morgen. "Priming Social Identity with Campaign Advertising: The Cues Candidates Use and their Effect on Voters' Candidate Evaluations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA 2008 Annual Meeting, Hynes Convention Center, Boston, Massachusetts, Aug 28, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p280096_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although there is much work on social identity theory, there is relatively little research that explores the connection between social identity and campaigns. This paper proposes that candidates use campaign advertising to trigger voters’ feelings of social identity. Specifically, this paper examines the cues candidates provide in their ads to trigger social identity and how well those signals influence candidate evaluations. This paper focuses on two social identities candidates may emphasize in their ads to influence how voters perceive them: race and gender. The relationship between social identity cues and candidate evaluations is explored with multilevel models that allow for an individual level focus. Results are discussed within the social identity literature and more broadly within the literature on how campaigns, and campaign advertising, affect voters and their evaluations of candidates.

2004 - International Communication Association Pages: 25 pages || Words: 8199 words || 
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2. Meraz, Sharon. "Candidate Web sites and candidate press releases: Agenda setting in the 2002 Texas gubernatorial election" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, New Orleans Sheraton, New Orleans, LA, May 27, 2004 Online <.PDF>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p113215_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study had two central goals: to replicate prior research conducted on the agenda setting effect of candidates’ political advertising on the media agenda and to contribute much needed research on the agenda setting influence of the candidate press release at both the issue level and the attribute level. Breaking analysis into two time periods, a total of 72 press releases were downloaded from the candidates’ Web sites and compared with 107 newspaper articles. Through human-coder content analysis and using cross-lagged correlation analysis, results highlighted that only the incumbent Rick Perry was successful in setting the media issue agenda. The challenger Tony Sanchez was influenced by the media when developing his issue agenda and was also unable to transfer his agenda on Perry to the media’s agenda on Perry. At the substantive attribute level, both incumbent and challenger Sanchez were influential in framing the media’s substantive agendas for themselves and their opponent. The candidate to media correlations for both ranged from .675 to .9, while three out of the four media-to-candidate correlations fell below the Rozelle-Campbell baseline. As hypothesized, the combined affective agenda of both candidates bore strong correlations to the media’s affective agenda on each candidate. Measuring individual influence of candidate and opponent for affective agenda setting revealed that the opponent was more successful at setting the candidate’s affective agenda in the media than the candidate in setting his own affective agenda. These results confirmed the media’s slant towards presenting more negative than positive coverage of political candidates.

2005 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 50 pages || Words: 14844 words || 
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3. Holbrook, R.. "Candidates for Elected Office and the Causes of Political Anxiety: Differentiating between Threat and Novelty in Candidate Messages" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 07, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p85091_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While much research has explored the effects of anxiety on politics, little has examined the causes of political anxiety. This paper examines what candidate characteristics cause anxiety, differentiating between threatening and novel characteristics, and examines anxiety's effects based on whether threat or novelty is the cause of this emotional response.

2008 - MPSA Annual National Conference Pages: 46 pages || Words: 13757 words || 
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4. Bos, Angela. "Is All Information Created Equal? An Analysis of How Candidate Information Source Influences Perceptions of Female Candidates" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual National Conference, Palmer House Hotel, Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 03, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p266727_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: I examine the ways in which the information environment of party nomination conventions affects delegates' perceptions of female candidates. I find that information environment influences delegate's likelihood to vote for a female candidate.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 24 pages || Words: 6358 words || 
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5. Rittenberg, Jason. and Tewksbury, David. "Perusing Candidate Web Sites: The Effects of Viewing Selected Content on Candidate Reports" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257734_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Internet plays an important role in political campaigns, but little is known about the effects of citizen exposure to candidate web sites. This experiment tests whether time spent with policy, background, and campaign information on web sites predicts voters’ self-perceived knowledge and evaluations of candidates, and the confidence with which they express their evaluations. The analyses suggest that campaign sites can affect what people think they know about candidates and how they evaluate them.

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