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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10814 words || 
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1. Jensen, Carsten. "Social Stratification and Capitalism: From Managerial Capitalism to Hedge Fund Capitalism, from Status to Market" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1376949_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is a theoretically-oriented analysis that discusses long-term trends in capitalism and the resulting forms of stratification within capitalism. The focus is specifically on identifying trends and characteristics of the forms of stratification that dominate current capitalism, as it has evolved since the mid-1980s. The paper argues that capitalism can be divided into three historical phases based on the way ownership of enterprises has developed. Inspired by Ralf Dahrendorf (Dahrendorf, 1959), Daniel Bell (Bell, 1976) and Michael Useem (Useem, 1996), it takes its point of departure in three types of capitalism: 'ownership capitalism', 'managerial capitalism' and 'hedge fund capitalism', where each type characterizes a phase in capitalist development. It is argued that each of the three phases underpin specific forms of social stratification. Simultaneously, the paper is based on Max Weber's classic distinction between ‘class’ and ‘status’ from ‘Economy and Society’ (Weber, 1968). Weber develops a distinction between what can be called a kind of an 'economic' (class) and a kind of 'identity' (status groups) axis in the analysis of social stratification, that can be seen as highlighting the contrast and contradiction between status-based and market-based social formations and interactions. The argument in the paper is that changes in forms of ownership (from ‘managerial capitalism’ to 'hedge fund capitalism') imply that the market and ‘market-based’ forms of social stratification play an increasingly important role at the expense of different types of ‘status-based’ social stratification.

2013 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 6337 words || 
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2. Kalinowski, Thomas. and Jang, Suyoun. "Non-Liberal Capitalism and the Varieties of Capitalism Debate: Comparing European and East Asian Capitalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, University of Milan, Milan, Italy, Jun 27, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p649508_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For the past few decades, research within the field of comparative political economy has provided overarching analytical framework for understanding the diversity of capitalism. Notably, the varieties of capitalism (VoC) approach by Hall and Soskice (2001) contributed to the progression of the field and its dichotomy between liberal market economies (LMEs) and coordinated market economies (CMEs) has been widely adopted by most studies of diversity in capitalist economies. With the exception of Japan (Streeck, Yamamura 2001, 2003; Vogel 2006), VoC researchers have largely ignored other Asian economies. Notable exemptions are Coates (1999, 2000) and Amable (2003) that extended the analysis to include Asian economies such as Korea and introduce the category of a state-led Asian capitalism. However, the term East Asian capitalism is still not fully substantiated and much more empirical research is needed to understand similarities and differences of East Asian varieties of capitalism. Therefore, this paper extends the scope of the inquiry into the varieties of capitalism to including not just Japan and Korea but particularly China and Malaysia and examines varieties of Asian capitalisms by using quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Indeed, Asian economies are at various stages of emergence and transition including underdeveloped communist transition economies (China, Vietnam), newly industrializing economies (Malaysia, Thailand, etc.) and mature, highly industrialized economies (Japan, South Korea, Taiwan). In this sense, Asia may be understood as one of the most economically diverse regions in the global system. Therefore, this paper aims to bring the discussion on diversity of Asian capitalism to VoC framework and provides an analysis of whether Asian economies collectively or singularly represent different models of capitalism that are distinct from the VoC’s dualist typology.
To this end, the paper first quantitatively analyses the Asian capitalisms according to the extent of national institutional arrangements governing finance and labour depends on market mechanism or strategic coordination. By using data from the World Bank, the ILO, and the IMF, the paper finds that despite the diversity of capitalism within East Asia there are striking similarities that justify the use of the term East Asian capitalism. From the quantitative data analysis, the study narrows down its focus to four countries including China, Japan, Korea and Malaysia. We label this group East Asian developmental state capitalism that is characterized by close coordination between state, business and finance, the lack of coordination in the labour market and the exclusion of organized labour. To develop this idea further, we then uses a qualitative analysis of case studies to examine first how Asian capitalisms are different from the VoC’s dichotomy and second why it makes sense to group these four economies together despite their differences.

2011 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 8251 words || 
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3. Moon, Tae Joon. "Bridging Two Dimensions of Social Capital: Sociability Capital vs. Societal Capital" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, TBA, Boston, MA, May 25, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p492078_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper focuses on integrating various perspectives and findings by identifying multi-dimensionality of social capital and relationship among distinctive dimensions. As an effort for this, I first differentiate two dimensions of social capital: sociability capital and societal capital. The former refers to the benefits or harms of the individual produced by social interaction, whereas the latter means the collective level of outcomes influenced by dynamics of social interactions among individuals or groups. Based on this re-conceptualization, I provide a synthesized explanation of how various types of social interaction succeed or fail to contribute to the benefits of society as well as the individual.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Pages: 27 pages || Words: 8770 words || 
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4. thomas, darryl. "Diverging Waves of Capital Accumulation, Black Capital Formation and the Specificities of Black Capitalism: From B.T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, to Harold Washington and Beyond" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 02, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361490_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the Golden Age of Black Capitalism with the making of US Empire in the 19th/20th centuries and the recent 21st century US Empire. It draws attention divergent waves of capital accumulation and the segregationist economic models and Jim Crow Business models they spawn as well as the post-Fordist and globalization model of black capital formation.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 180 words || 
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5. Mhando, Lindah. "Black Women, Capital Formation and Black Capitalism in the Urban Context:From Madame C.J.Walker, Mary Kay to Sylvia’s Restaurant and Beyond:Gender, the Great Migration and Black Capitalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p362474_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper tries to explore the concept of capital accumulation through crafts, self-employment, and micro enterprises. In particular I will delineate emergence of black women entrepreneurs in the urban contexts, these women proved to be the most imaginative and success tasting black capitalists. Whites have had "affirmative action," so long built into the system that they sanctimoniously talk of as free enterprise. This they translate as ability, individual initiative, and skillful business techniques as though they were endowed with them at birth and ordained with clever means of making money. Coming to the modern period, the story revolves around many enterprising such as Mary Kay, Oprah Winfrey, Sylvia to a new wave of immigrants. _x000d_I will then examine the linkages and interconnections between labor, race and democracy with reference to industrialization and postwar development. The paper will try to grapple with the examination of capital accumulation revolving around Fordist to the deindustrialization of the post Fordist era; how industrial capital relegates black capitalism to the periphery, and how that impacted the subsequent division of labor from globalization through neoliberal globalization.

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