Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 328 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 66 - Next  Jump:
2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6333 words || 
Info
1. Liu, John. "Uncooperative Carbon: Examining the Material Foundation of Global Carbon Market" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722913_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For a carbon market to function, a stable measurement on carbon emission is essential. Yet, carbon measurement is characterized by less than desirable accuracy and laden with uncertainties. Based on 60 in-depth interviews from the European Union, the United States, and China, the paper examines the difficulties in quantifying power sector carbon emissions. The reasons to focus on power sector are threefold: 1) it is the most common emission source 2) it is the most understood emission source 3) there are divergent measurement practices in Europe and the United States. Most facilities in the EU ETS use the more traditional calculation method, based on mass or heat balance; meanwhile, many American companies are required to use measurement method with the Continuous Emission Monitoring System (CEMS). My investigation shows that the discrepancies between the two different measurement methods are significant. This paper traces the regulatory dynamics that led to the divergence in practices across Atlantic, and discusses how materiality might constrain the commodification of carbon emissions. This discussion has important implications as the carbon market is moving into new emissions sources, such as agriculture and land use change, and “linking” carbon markets in different parts of the world is on the agenda.

2017 - DSI Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Dhanda, Kanwalroop. and Malik, Mahfuja. "Carbon Disclosures, Carbon Outsourcing and Firm Performance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, Nov 18, 2017 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1292940_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Why do firms disclose emissions information? In this project, we aim to examine the factors, both firm-specific and those related to carbon management strategy, that account for emission disclosure behavior. We would also test whether firms outsource emissions, by engaging in behavior that decreases direct emissions while increasing indirect emissions.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6312 words || 
Info
3. Descheneau, Philippe. "Translating Carbon into Financial Products : The Financialization of Carbon Markets and the Governance of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p500700_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The financial sector has become an important part of the carbon markets and the clean development mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol. The governance of the CDM is an innovative model where private and public bodies work together under the supervision of an intergovernmental body, the UNFCCC secretariat. The functioning of the CDM has moved away from the original intent of a developmental objective (Paulsson, 2009) towards more inclusion of the financial sector. The carbon markets have also been relatively not much affected by the financial crisis even if fears have been raised of « sub-prime carbon » (FOE, 2009). But is the financialization of carbon markets undermining their environmental integrity? And what are the consequences of the financialization in the CDM? We inquire the financialization of carbon markets using actor-network theory and cultural political economy literature and by looking at three caracteristics in carbon markets and the CDM in particular : mobility of individual and organizations, implication by the actors and the nature of financial tools used. We show that this financialization demonstrate an important shift in the political authority but that authority can only be exerced with the right political signal.

2011 - International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition" Pages: 18 pages || Words: 6776 words || 
Info
4. Harrington, Jonathan. "Developing New Strategies for Reducing Household Carbon Emissions: Personal Carbon Reduction Groups as Catalysts for Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association Annual Conference "Global Governance: Political Authority in Transition", Le Centre Sheraton Montreal Hotel, MONTREAL, QUEBEC, CANADA, Mar 16, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-01-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p499291_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One major challenge that confounds efforts to reduce human-induced carbon emissions is the persistent disconnect between good intentions and behavior. Globally, mass publics profess a desire to reduce their contribution to global warming. However, household GHG emissions continue to rise. One reason for this mismatch may be that the theoretical and methodological strategies used to craft behavioral interventions are not well suited to induce individuals to reduce their carbon footprints. Numerous studies have shown that no one theoretical orientation has proven effective in predicting either pro-environmental intent or action over a range of behaviors. Knowledge does not necessarily lead to concern. Concern does not necessarily motivate individuals to formulate pro-environmental intentions. And numerous barriers limit conversion of good intentions into measurable action. Also, very few studies specifically address how using carbon reduction as an actionable cue (as opposed to energy efficiency/conservation, adoption of renewable energy or recycling etc.) influences behavioral outcomes. In response to these shortcomings, this study posits that value-belief-norm theory (VBN) may provide a viable strategy by offering a multi-theoretical approach that identifies how attitudes, habit, personal attributes and contextual factors interact and influence low carbon behavior (Stern 2000). Another related problem is that even motivated individuals are often confused about the relative carbon reduction benefits of different activities; i.e. recycling vs. cutting back on air travel etc. (Whitmarsh 2009). This study also explores the efficacy of a real world intervention, i.e. the personal carbon reduction group, which is designed to overcome behavioral barriers. A personal carbon reduction group is a cohesive group of individuals who meet on a regular basis for the specific purpose of benchmarking, periodically reviewing and reducing their carbon footprints (Harrington 2010). A ‘proof of concept’ pilot survey instrument is developed to explore the characteristics and mitigation effectiveness of these groups. Preliminary results of the cross-national pilot survey are presented. This study finds that further research on personal carbon reduction groups may contribute to both theoretical and applied investigations of the mechanisms that drive low carbon behavior.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 66 - Next  Jump:

©2020 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy