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Showing 1 through 5 of 21 records.
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2008 - The Association for Women in Psychology Words: 55 words || 
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1. Dye, April. "Quilters, Caretakers, or Ellie Mae Clampett: Changing the unchanging stereotypes of Appalachian women" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Association for Women in Psychology, Hilton San Diego - Mission Valley, San Diego, CA, Mar 13, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p230456_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: According to Reed (1993), “Hillbillies appear to be the last acceptable ethnic fools.” Interviews are used to ascertain the current and future perceptions of Appalachian women, as well as the impact of the stigma for Appalachians in their opportunities. Focus groups are used to develop and implement a plan for the reduction of stigma.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 163 words || 
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2. Shea, Stephanie., Fabian, Sheri. and Palys, Ted. "Caretakers of the Mountain: Ethnography of a Pipeline Blockade" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1029472_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the Fall of 2014, citizens of Vancouver and Burnaby took part in a blockade in an attempt to prevent company Kinder Morgan from conducting survey work in Burnaby Mountain Park. The company’s intentions were met with intense local resistance from many levels, due to an existing culture of environmental protesters in the area, as well as the company’s decision to continue the project against the wishes of the municipality itself and in conflict with local bylaws protecting the park, a registered conservation area. An ethnography was conducted of the resistance to these drilling efforts, field observations spanning from the initial monitoring of the site, through the growing mobilization of the resistance, through to the mass arrests of protesters in November of that year. The ongoing analysis for this project explores the philosophy of protest and radicalism, as well as the role of consensus and conflict frameworks in the language of protesters and their use of various tactics of resistance.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 78 words || 
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3. Douds, Anne. and Hollman, Christine. "Assessing Services for Children Contemporaneous with Caretaker Arrest" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1291093_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While evidence establishes the adverse consequences of caretaker incarceration upon children, there are little to no data on what happens to children in the earliest stages of the criminal justice process, specifically the period between arrest and trial. This study employees systems analysis and qualitative interviews to describe previously undocumented data on what happens to children after a caretaker is arrested and where the criminal justice system can develop opportunities to intervene with this vulnerable population.

2018 - Comparative and International Education Society Conference Words: 381 words || 
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4. Jaffe, Sarah. and Crane, Annya. "Using mobile reading to promote caretaker-child interaction and improve literacy in Jordan" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society Conference, Hilton Mexico City Reforma Hotel, Mexico City, Mexico, <Not Available>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1357762_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The benefits of reading aloud to young children are numerous and well documented. Reading aloud plays a crucial role in early childhood development and educational outcomes later in life. Moreover, reading can be used as a tool to increase positive, playful adult-child interaction and promote child-caretaker bonding. Research shows that child-adult interactions around playful storytelling and can result in the improvement in expressive oral language and social regulation skills (Whitebread, et al. “The Importance of Play,” 2012, University of Cambridge). In a crisis-affected context, learning is compromised by reduced instructional time, overcrowded classrooms, and limited instructional and didactic learning materials. With education systems under stress, parents and caregivers can bridge this gap and contribute to children's expressive oral language development, pre- and emergent literacy skills and continued out of classroom learning. The practice of regular reading and storytelling to children can also strengthen the child-caregiver relationship and promote psychosocial well-being and healing in times of crisis. Reading is an enriching activity that provides a safe space within which to explore stories, escape daily stress and interact with one another around a quality book or short story.

Building off the lessons learned from the Read to Kids India pilot project, Worldreader launched the Read to Kids program in Jordan in 2017, with the aim of contributing to the psychosocial well-being and improved literacy of over 50,000 Jordanian and Syrian refugee children. The program seeks to promote a culture of reading by working with local community and education partners to integrate the Read to Kids mobile app into their programs, a behavior change campaign, and a digital user acquisition strategy that will leverage social media for widespread distribution and consumption of Read to Kids Arabic books. This Read to Kids content library comes from Arabic publishers, is curated in collaboration with education stakeholders in Jordan, and will include a sub-collection of titles focused on psychosocial recovery, empathy and healing for children who have been affected by conflict.
In this session, we’ll address lessons learned in promoting positive child-caretaker interactions and using stories and reading. This will include a discussion of advantages and considerations for working to scale up ECE through technology, and tricks and tips to “extend” the reading experience beyond the end of the book and promote interactive and informal learning.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6558 words || 
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5. Pittman, LaShawnDa. "Parental Response Missing Link in African American Caretaking Grandmothers Institutional Decision Making." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 07, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p309096_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I use ethnographic and in-depth interview data to explore factors shaping the institutional decision making processes of forty-four low-income, urban African American caretaking grandmothers residing on Chicago’s Southside. As the social problems facing inner-city families becomes starker, so too do the increased likelihood that grandmothers will assume primary caretaking for their grandchildren. Examining how grandmothers determine what type of care arrangement (e.g. private, guardianship, or kinship foster care) is needed to facilitate becoming or remaining the sole or primary caretaker of their grandchildren sheds light on how these decisions are complicated by factors beyond the circumstances (e.g. incarceration, HIV/AIDS, poverty, etc….) leading to their involvement. I argue that caretaking grandmothers devise strategies to address barriers that may hinder them from diminishing threats to their grandchildren’s welfare. Strategies are developed to vie with parental responses, institutional management, and self-interest- making institutional decision making a complex and continuous undertaking. I contend that from the beginning of the assumption of care, grandmothers’ work to produce satisfactory parental responses to the child welfare threat responsible for their involvement, they assert their own self-interest, and they embark on the complicated task of maximizing institutional resources while simultaneously minimizing their intrusiveness. Ultimately, I highlight how an eroding U.S. social welfare system and punitive child welfare policies place inner-city children at risk by increasing their likelihood of experiencing actual or potential child welfare threats and severely undermining their families’ ability to close the gap between their needs and the resources they have to meet them.

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