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2006 - The Midwest Political Science Association Words: 37 words || 
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1. Edozie, Rita. "Cooperating Against (Small State) Global Marginalization: The African Union (AU) and CARICOM on Haiti 2004" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p138043_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Examines the 2004 Haitian crisis and new global governance and international security trends with respect to the joint AU and CARICOM response to Aristide's ousting. Both regional IGOs criticize the neo-realist security thesis that badly governed and

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 32 pages || Words: 7752 words || 
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2. Charles, Marjorie. "Crisis In The Health Sector Of Caribbean Countries: The Impact Of Trade Liberalization And The Movement Of Labour On Health Services In CARICOM" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p251321_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The process of globalization with attendant advancement in technology, communication and transportation has occasioned corresponding changes in the approach to domestic and global issues and in the methodologies employed to address problems inherent in the attempt to provide some amount of direction and regulation at the global level. To this extent domestic policies are influenced by decisions made in the global arena. While there are major areas in which the impact of globalization is readily felt; for example financial services and telecommunications, there are others governed by the Agreement on Trade in Services, which may not on the surface appear to be considered trade issues in the truest sense, and within developing countries these could easily be viewed as the prerogative of the respective governments. The Health-related and Social Services and the Professional Services that address health professionals are examples of this. The laws of supply and demand have also managed to penetrate this sector.It could be argued that within the context of the trade in services agreement, differences among countries on regulatory measures on professional services and licensing could render it difficult for service providers to supply their service in another country via the movement of natural persons. Additionally the Agreement indicates that most countries will continue to apply their existing regulations to this area. This means that degrees and other professional qualifications obtained in other countries are not recognized as equivalent. The implication is that foreigners holding such qualifications are not permitted to work in hospitals as nurses, doctors or midwives, or to provide other health or social services. The situation within the Caribbean as regards the exodus of nurses from individual countries negates this point. This barrier has been transcended. The Caribbean region has virtually transformed itself into an exporter of services through the movement of technically qualified persons – nurses. While benefits may accrue to the individuals, the economic impact on the exporting countries is vast, as the gaps left by those who migrate have to be filled. In addition nursing education is greatly subsidized by the government.This paper examines the impact of migration of nurses on the health sector in the CARICOM region and implications for policy making. It also examines the extent to which domestic regulation in the health sector can be used as a tool for policy making

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 12818 words || 
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3. Bernard, David. "The Neoliberal Feedback Loop: World Bank Projects in the Caricom Region" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p722169_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An analysis of the World Bank’s projects in the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) between 1956 and 2012 showed that the Bank has been evolving from a long-term development agency to one which has largely been concerned with managing and mitigating crises. Crises have become the starting point of a neoliberal feedback loop. The development aid/funding necessary to manage these crises come with neoliberal conditionalities, which limit and restructure governments in the periphery in order to facilitate the flow of capital. However, because the projects do not resolve the crises, the loop is reinitialized by subsequent (financial) crises and (natural) disasters. Originally, the larger, resource-rich countries of CARICOM—like Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago—received all the region’s projects. This was during the modernization era of the 1960s, and most projects were concerned infrastructure and industry in countries with sufficient size/resources to develop. However, with the rise of globalization, the Bank’s projects have largely been concerned with restructuring the nature of government. In the last decade, most CARICOM projects have been in the Public Administration, Law and Justice sector, reflecting the neoliberal impetus to transform peripheral countries’ governments and make them more receptive to foreign capital. Recent infrastructure projects in the region have been in direct response to natural disasters (hurricanes) which continue to roil the region’s long-term development initiatives.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 34 pages || Words: 10479 words || 
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4. Hinds Harrison, Kristina. "Civil Society Regionalisation and Access to Policy Space: The Case of CARICOM" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p252509_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper seeks to probe the extent to which regional civil society mobilisation has been recognised and given space in Caribbean policy circles by focussing on the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and international trade negotiations. Although state sponsored regional integration initiatives have been in process in the Anglophone Caribbean from the 1950s, little emphasis has been placed on non-state activities that promote regional integration. Indeed, civil society networking in the Caribbean can be traced at least to the early 20th century and should be viewed as feeding into and enhancing state-sponsored efforts at deepening regional integration. In the current day, Caribbean civil society networking has come, quite often, to address and provide policy alternatives to regional and global initiatives. Yet, one is left unclear as to whether Caribbean civil society and civil society organisations have been able to find space to contribute to integration through being included in formal policy spheres. This paper attempts to find answers to this question in the CARICOM context. This paper focuses on civil society organisations' inclusion in trade liberalising initiatives affecting the region since trade liberalising negotiations are some of the more contentious policy issues affecting the region.

2008 - ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES Pages: 22 pages || Words: 6179 words || 
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5. Byron, Jessica. "CARICOM and Security Governance: Probing the Limits of Regional Cooperation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISA's 49th ANNUAL CONVENTION, BRIDGING MULTIPLE DIVIDES, Hilton San Francisco, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA, Mar 26, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p254661_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Regional integration in the Caribbean has always had an implicit security dimension. It has been driven by small state perceptions of their political and economic vulnerability vis-à-vis the external environment and the need for collective responses. Since 1973, a number of institutions have evolved to provide responses in the form of regular consultations and declaratory diplomacy, harmonized approaches to national security, dispute settlement and conflict management mechanisms and collaboration with other multilateral organizations like the OAS. Nonetheless, from the Grenada Revolution to the Haitian Crisis of 2006, CARICOM has struggled to reach a consensus, undertake effective joint action and maintain its credibility in the face of certain regional security issues. This paper will explore some crucial challenges and discuss the evolution of security governance within CARICOM since the West Indian Commission Report in the early 1990s.

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