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2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 195 words || 
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1. Liu, Haiyan. "Do the “Haves” Come Out Ahead in Criminal Cases? The Impact of Victim Characteristics on Case Outcomes for Chinese IP Theft Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-06-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although Galanter (1974) raised the question ‘Why the “Haves” Come out Ahead?’ in the context of civil lawsuits, no research yet has examined the impact of corporate victims as repeat players on the outcomes of criminal cases in China. Previous research on Chinese criminal cases examined only the impact on case outcomes of legal factors such as offender confession, the presence of legal representation, and offender characteristics (such as gender, occupation, and floating population status) (Lu & Miethe 2002, Lu & Kriss 2002, Lu 2003,). I will conduct bivariate and multivariate analysis such as logistic and multiple regression tests. In addition to the numerous variables on legal factors and offender characteristics that are available to be coded from the Chinese summary judgments of IP theft cases I collected, I will add to my statistical models several variables on victim characteristics, such as corporate ownership and the involvement of top brands. According to present evidence, I hypothesize that corporate victims of foreign interests and State Owned Enterprises and those carrying top brands are associated with more severe punishments and heavier fines compared to domestic private or collective companies and companies carrying common or generic trademarks.

2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 152 words || 
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2. Weinberg, Jill., Nelson, Robert. and Nielsen, Laura. "Good Case, Bad Case, No Case: The Contested Construction of Employment Discrimination" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406929_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The construction of law has been the center of theoretical, juridical, and sociological fields of research. These literatures examine the history and efficacy of particular legislative or judicial interpretations as well as the short- and long-term effects of the law on the social landscape. Within this discourse is an exercise of boundary-drawing of what "is" law. Implictly, this commentary suggests that there exists conduct outside these legal boundaries, and often, when litigation are deemed frivolous. This paper seeks to address these issues using qualitative data from plaintiffs, defendants and the lawyers involved in federal employment civil rights cases between 1988 and 2003. The qualitative data provides considerable insight that quantiative analysis cannot capture, that is, the forces that shape the claims construction process of employers, employees and the lawyers involved in EO litigation. These interviews reveal how legal frivolousness is constructed and how this construction varies.

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 143 words || 
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3. Williams, Linda., Pattavina, April. and Morabito, Melissa. "Victim Characteristics and Case Attrition: How Who Gets Raped Impacts Sexual Assault Case Attrition" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1277635_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: In our cross-jurisdiction study of case processing of 3478 reports of sexual assault in six police departments located across the United States, we examine case attrition and the factors associated with exceptional clearance, arrest, prosecution, and conviction. We found there is substantial attrition in sexual assault cases with fewer than one in five reported cases being cleared by an arrest and most of these cases never going forward to prosecution. Our research reveals that case attrition is influenced by a variety of legal and extralegal factors. In this paper we present findings on the influence of the characteristics of the victim and her behavior prior to or following the alleged rape on the case outcome. We consider our findings within theoretical contexts related to policing, prosecution, and justice. The paper concludes with recommendations for improvements in justice system practice and policies.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Pages: 5 pages || Words: 1607 words || 
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4. Hill, Janice. "Prosecuting Child Sexual Abuse: A Case Study of Victim, Family, Offender, Evidentiary, and Case Characteristics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 14, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p201581_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The purpose of this dissertation research is to analyze child sexual assault prosecution outcomes from cases interviewed by the Children’s Advocacy Center from the County of St. Louis, Missouri, using a theoretical foundation of uncertainty avoidance in prosecutorial decision-making. The primary research questions ask how victim characteristics, family characteristics, disclosure characteristics, offender characteristics, type of CSA, and evidentiary considerations are related to conviction of CSA offenders. The research seeks to resolve some of the inconsistencies in the existing body of CSA victimization literature through collecting victim and incident data from information gathered from child victims and their caregivers, prior to referral to prosecution, and developing statistical models that control for a greater variety of variables in prosecutorial outcomes. Data has been collected from all St. Louis County CSA cases interviewed by the CAC during 2002-2003 (203 victims), including referral and investigation; victim, family, and case characteristics, and alleged offender names. Data has also been collected on prosecution variables, including charge and sentence, from court files. The presentation will include results from univariate analyses in comparison to other research, and logistic regression for predictive models of conviction. Dependent variables include charges issued, plea agreement or trial, and sentence.

2006 - American Political Science Association Pages: 48 pages || Words: 18655 words || 
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5. Chatterjee, Abhishek. "Toward an Ontology of Case Studies (or Why Most Existing Defenses of Qualitative Case Studies Fail)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Marriott, Loews Philadelphia, and the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 31, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-06-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p152861_index.html>
Publication Type: Proceeding
Abstract: A critical examination of some of the justifications of case studies in political science, demonstrate that the ontology often accepted—implicitly or explicitly—is “reductionist” and “regularist”, i.e. one which respectively defines causes in terms of non-causal relations and states of affair and affirms that such non-causal relations are regularities in nature. As such this paper will argue that epistemological and methodological positions that follow from, and support, such a metaphysics logically cannot accord case studies a necessary or sufficient role in the in the establishment of causal relations. The same applies to those arguments that claim that case studies illuminate causal mechanisms, for then the justification rests on the definition of “mechanism”. If mechanisms are defined as concatenation of variables the conception of causality alluded to above recurs in another guise resulting in similar problems in justifying case studies. Ultimately therefore such defenses at best can claim a distant second-best status for case studies. However there are metaphysical positions within the ambit of an empiricist philosophy of science that support the independent and hence sufficient role of even a single case study in substantiating causal claims. Three such metaphysical positions will be discussed in this paper. The first is based on what is sometimes called a “singularist” notion of causality that holds that singular events are causally more basic than type causes. This conception, while remaining reductionist, decouples generalizations from the definition of causality. Generalizations in this case are ‘bottom up’ and change based on the relevant contrast spaces rather than ‘top-down’ and ostensibly universal. A second metaphysical view is neither regularist nor reductionist and—to be slightly cryptic—sees the general comprehensible only through the particular. A variation of this view holds that causes cannot be reduced and that they can be comprehended only when one possesses knowledge of concepts that are already causal and this preexisting knowledge is not the knowledge of regularities. Though these views sufficiently support both single case studies and comparative case studies, the paper will argue that the second position is both more convincing and provides better support to the case study method.

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