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2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 195 words || 
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1. Liu, Haiyan. "Do the “Haves” Come Out Ahead in Criminal Cases? The Impact of Victim Characteristics on Case Outcomes for Chinese IP Theft Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although Galanter (1974) raised the question ‘Why the “Haves” Come out Ahead?’ in the context of civil lawsuits, no research yet has examined the impact of corporate victims as repeat players on the outcomes of criminal cases in China. Previous research on Chinese criminal cases examined only the impact on case outcomes of legal factors such as offender confession, the presence of legal representation, and offender characteristics (such as gender, occupation, and floating population status) (Lu & Miethe 2002, Lu & Kriss 2002, Lu 2003,). I will conduct bivariate and multivariate analysis such as logistic and multiple regression tests. In addition to the numerous variables on legal factors and offender characteristics that are available to be coded from the Chinese summary judgments of IP theft cases I collected, I will add to my statistical models several variables on victim characteristics, such as corporate ownership and the involvement of top brands. According to present evidence, I hypothesize that corporate victims of foreign interests and State Owned Enterprises and those carrying top brands are associated with more severe punishments and heavier fines compared to domestic private or collective companies and companies carrying common or generic trademarks.

2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 152 words || 
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2. Weinberg, Jill., Nelson, Robert. and Nielsen, Laura. "Good Case, Bad Case, No Case: The Contested Construction of Employment Discrimination" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406929_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The construction of law has been the center of theoretical, juridical, and sociological fields of research. These literatures examine the history and efficacy of particular legislative or judicial interpretations as well as the short- and long-term effects of the law on the social landscape. Within this discourse is an exercise of boundary-drawing of what "is" law. Implictly, this commentary suggests that there exists conduct outside these legal boundaries, and often, when litigation are deemed frivolous. This paper seeks to address these issues using qualitative data from plaintiffs, defendants and the lawyers involved in federal employment civil rights cases between 1988 and 2003. The qualitative data provides considerable insight that quantiative analysis cannot capture, that is, the forces that shape the claims construction process of employers, employees and the lawyers involved in EO litigation. These interviews reveal how legal frivolousness is constructed and how this construction varies.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 243 words || 
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3. Ross, James. "Case Processing Decision-Making in the New York State Family Court: An Investigation of the courtroom workgroup relationships on case processing decisions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33344_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This research investigatd the case-processing of juveniles within New York State’s Family Court. The research will describe observed case processing hearings that occurred over 18 months and will attempt to develop a paradigm that incorporates the effects courtroom workgroup factors on case-processing decisions.
The present research seeks to extend previous work regarding the courtroom workgroup that is based on the general proposition that analogous to other workgroups they will utilize strategies analogous to those used by other organizational decision-makers who must perform their job functions in light of incomplete information and uncertain outcomes. The current research is concerned with achieving a more complete understanding of the mechanisms by which the relationships between courtroom workgroup members influence case-processing decisions. The focal point of this research is the development of an amalgamated paradigm based on organization theory, Black’s Sociology of the Case, and attribution theory to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms case processing.
It is the intent of this analysis to be an exploratory study to determine, preliminarily, the process by which judges, the county attorneys (as the manifestation of the legal embodiment of the State), the juvenile defense bar and various other courtroom workgroup participants operate as an organized set of functionally interdependent actors in the New York juvenile justice system. This research will employ the case study approach to analyze the process by which dispositional decisions are made and focus on the nature of the informal interpersonal relationships among the courtroom workgroup.

2007 - AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY Words: 235 words || 
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4. Keller, Elizabeth. "What Happens at the 73-Hour Mark?: Case Outcomes in Sexual Assault Cases When Victims Delay Reporting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AMERICAN SOCIETY OF CRIMINOLOGY, Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, Georgia, Nov 14, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p200643_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Conventional wisdom and common sense dictate that sexual assault victims should report their victimization as quickly as possible. The forensic exam and collection of evidence are time-sensitive procedures; it is in everyone’s interest for these to occur as quickly as possible. Now that DNA testing is available, prompt collection of evidence can assist in the identification of unknown suspects. Documenting the victim’s account while it is still fresh in his/her memory is also important for subsequent investigation and prosecution. A 72-hour post-assault window is usually suggested as the ideal for evidence collection and an initial police interview. What if, however, the victim delays reporting, as many victims do? What will be the outcome of those cases? This study proposes to test that proposition, using cases in which the identity of the suspect is known to the victim. In these cases, consent is the key issue of the case. Consent, and the lack thereof, may be demonstrated through documentation of bruising, injury, and the victim’s account of the incident. This evidence frequently remains available after the traditional 72-hour window has closed. Using recent data from a major US city, this study will examine the case outcomes of sexual assault cases in which the victim can identify an offender, comparing the outcomes in cases reported less than 72 hours post-assault with those of cases reported later.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 14861 words || 
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5. Sinkler, Adrian. "The "Autopsy Approach" to Case Selection: Re-evaluating the Role of Case Studies in the Social Sciences" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-11-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209882_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The status of case study research has generated a vigorous debate among social scientists. Some have claimed that case studies are an important, if not invaluable, part of the theory building process while others have challenged the assertion that case study research can contribute to the goal of evaluating general theories. This has been a fruitful debate inasmuch as it has encouraged us to think more carefully about our methodological choices. However, I argue that the debate surrounding case study methods is often informed by an overly narrow definition of science and causal inference—namely that science is reducible to the pursuit of general theory and establishing patterns of covariance. Instead of this narrow definition of social science, I suggest that we expand our definition to include explaining individual historical events, a practice I define as a “case study.” Toward this end, I suggest that we think of the case study in social science in much the same way a medical examiner would think of an autopsy. The goal of the medical examiner is not to test a “general theory of death,” but to use her knowledge about the causes of death to explain a particular instance of it. Making the explanation of single outcomes a legitimate goal of social research enables us to appreciate the inferential technique of retroduction, which is not only common in autopsies, but is also common in natural sciences like geology. It also helps us clarify the fact that we can only test hypotheses that purport to explain an individual outcome when we are using case study methods. I conclude by suggesting that the explanation of individual events is what makes case studies such indispensable tools for searching out new information that might improve our general knowledge of the social world.

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