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Showing 1 through 5 of 16,042 records.
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2012 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 195 words || 
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1. Liu, Haiyan. "Do the “Haves” Come Out Ahead in Criminal Cases? The Impact of Victim Characteristics on Case Outcomes for Chinese IP Theft Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p575958_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Although Galanter (1974) raised the question ‘Why the “Haves” Come out Ahead?’ in the context of civil lawsuits, no research yet has examined the impact of corporate victims as repeat players on the outcomes of criminal cases in China. Previous research on Chinese criminal cases examined only the impact on case outcomes of legal factors such as offender confession, the presence of legal representation, and offender characteristics (such as gender, occupation, and floating population status) (Lu & Miethe 2002, Lu & Kriss 2002, Lu 2003,). I will conduct bivariate and multivariate analysis such as logistic and multiple regression tests. In addition to the numerous variables on legal factors and offender characteristics that are available to be coded from the Chinese summary judgments of IP theft cases I collected, I will add to my statistical models several variables on victim characteristics, such as corporate ownership and the involvement of top brands. According to present evidence, I hypothesize that corporate victims of foreign interests and State Owned Enterprises and those carrying top brands are associated with more severe punishments and heavier fines compared to domestic private or collective companies and companies carrying common or generic trademarks.

2010 - The Law and Society Association Words: 152 words || 
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2. Weinberg, Jill., Nelson, Robert. and Nielsen, Laura. "Good Case, Bad Case, No Case: The Contested Construction of Employment Discrimination" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Renaissance Chicago Hotel, Chicago, IL, May 27, 2010 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406929_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The construction of law has been the center of theoretical, juridical, and sociological fields of research. These literatures examine the history and efficacy of particular legislative or judicial interpretations as well as the short- and long-term effects of the law on the social landscape. Within this discourse is an exercise of boundary-drawing of what "is" law. Implictly, this commentary suggests that there exists conduct outside these legal boundaries, and often, when litigation are deemed frivolous. This paper seeks to address these issues using qualitative data from plaintiffs, defendants and the lawyers involved in federal employment civil rights cases between 1988 and 2003. The qualitative data provides considerable insight that quantiative analysis cannot capture, that is, the forces that shape the claims construction process of employers, employees and the lawyers involved in EO litigation. These interviews reveal how legal frivolousness is constructed and how this construction varies.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 99 words || 
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3. Holt, Lauren. and Hugo, Darian. "“Are you Insane?!”: Determining Appropriate Case Resolution for Insanity Cases" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1344256_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Showcase
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the United States the insanity defense can be complex in application, and, is a rare occurrence. The misconception by the public is that it is a ‘legal loophole’ which lets malingerers off easily. Research and case law shows that citizens do not often understand diagnostic categories of mental illness. Researchers decided to examine the determination, categorization, and application of the insanity defense in a jury-eligible population. A 2x2 factorial, between persons, non-repeated measures design examining academic major and status was created. Results indicated that these independent variables were predictive of accurate understanding and application of the insanity defense.

2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Lane, Jeffrey. "A smartphone case method: Using smartphone data to reboot classic, ethnographic case studies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1515427_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper documents how using smartphones can enrich classic, ethnographic studies of youth and social problems by extending the scope of a case using everyday communication. Two study models in the field of children and media inform the proposed, methodological intervention. I demonstrate how and why to conduct case studies on and off the phone and across settings to capture interaction more accurately and robustly. To illustrate the smartphone case method, I walked through my collaborative fieldwork with JayVon, an eighteen-year-old from Harlem (New York, NY). The fieldwork uses network analysis of contacts and trace ethnography of activity logs and text-message content in the course of a traditional, ethnographic study. I show how the ecology of a case opens up naturally by analyzing smartphone data ethnographically. I then discuss the significant, ethical challenges that accompany networked access.

2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 243 words || 
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5. Ross, James. "Case Processing Decision-Making in the New York State Family Court: An Investigation of the courtroom workgroup relationships on case processing decisions" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33344_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This research investigatd the case-processing of juveniles within New York State’s Family Court. The research will describe observed case processing hearings that occurred over 18 months and will attempt to develop a paradigm that incorporates the effects courtroom workgroup factors on case-processing decisions.
The present research seeks to extend previous work regarding the courtroom workgroup that is based on the general proposition that analogous to other workgroups they will utilize strategies analogous to those used by other organizational decision-makers who must perform their job functions in light of incomplete information and uncertain outcomes. The current research is concerned with achieving a more complete understanding of the mechanisms by which the relationships between courtroom workgroup members influence case-processing decisions. The focal point of this research is the development of an amalgamated paradigm based on organization theory, Black’s Sociology of the Case, and attribution theory to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms case processing.
It is the intent of this analysis to be an exploratory study to determine, preliminarily, the process by which judges, the county attorneys (as the manifestation of the legal embodiment of the State), the juvenile defense bar and various other courtroom workgroup participants operate as an organized set of functionally interdependent actors in the New York juvenile justice system. This research will employ the case study approach to analyze the process by which dispositional decisions are made and focus on the nature of the informal interpersonal relationships among the courtroom workgroup.

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