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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6016 words || 
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1. Chun, Sung. "Catholic Pastoral Care as a Response to the Decline in Share of Catholics among Latinos" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1379940_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The Catholic Migrant Farmworker Network (CMFN) works to bring the pastoral presence of the Church to thousands of immigrants who reside in isolated rural areas of the U.S. since 1986. CMFN has developed a survey to help local parishes better serve migrants and rural immigrant population. CMFN distributed the survey questionnaire to 178 dioceses with a cover letter from Bishop Rutilio J. Del Riego. So far 75 dioceses returned their completed answers. This paper reports and discusses the results of a questionnaire survey of 178 dioceses staff members who were asked to evaluate their ministry for immigrants in terms of pastoral care and social services.

2009 - Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference Words: 41 words || 
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2. Brellenthin, Ryan. "The Catholic Effect: Catholic Roll Call Behavior in Congress" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association 67th Annual National Conference, The Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p361706_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study seeks to understand if Catholic legislator behavior is a function of the legislator’s Catholicism. This is done by comparing how much a legislator votes with the Catholic Church with a number of variables, most notably whether or not the

2010 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 409 words || 
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3. Duclos-Orsello, Elizabeth. "Young, Ethnic, Female, Catholic & Radical: Intentional Community and the Catholic Extension Society, 1960-70s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, Grand Hyatt, San Antonio, TX, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p417193_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Weaving together threads of the scholarship of social activism, the 1960s, second wave feminism, ethnicity, Catholic history and intentional communities, this paper will explore the preliminary findings of new research on the development and place of unexpected intentional community in the lives of female, Catholic, college graduates who lived and worked together in the late 1960s and early 1970s while volunteering throughout the US with the Catholic Extension Society lay missionary program. The paper initially enumerates and considers a set of factors that led these women to join Extension (ethnic identity, gender identity, religious training, professional aspirations, radical politics and theology) and places their choice within the movement culture and counterculture of these tumultuous years in American history. At a time when there were many intentional communities forming and reforming in "secular" US society—based on gender, race, ethnicity, religious beliefs, political leanings & ideological agendas—these post-Vatican II Catholic women found in the Extension Society model a way to participate in these larger social trends in a particularly "authentic" way (to use the framework developed by Doug Rossinow in The Politics of Authenticity when speaking about the Protestant theological origins of student activists at mid century).

The intentional communities that cropped up were not planned as such but developed as volunteers worked and lived together in economically and professionally challenging environments in some of the poorest rural and urban parts of the United States. Their shared life experiences (both during and prior to Extension) became integral to the volunteers’ ability to accomplish the work they set out to do in impoverished places. Out of an interest in serving others these pairs and small groups of lay women found themselves drawing upon and developing a sense of shared mission, shared space, shared finances, and shared world view. In some ways these intentional communities were quite different from those of other young “movement” women (and men) and yet this paper suggests that they offered a way for religiously-motivated social activists to participate in the wave of intentional community building among young “secular” Americans at the time. Of particular interest—and linking late 20th c. secular intentional community building with other more explicitly religious ones—is the way in which the Extension Society experience was, for some, tied either imaginatively or experientially to the lives of early 20th c. ethnic Catholic nuns or sisters, who offered models of intentional community and social change to some of the women choosing Extension in the 1960s and 70s.

2010 - Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies Words: 325 words || 
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4. Ciani, Adrian. "The Vatican, Israel, and the American Catholic Church: A Case Study in Cold War Catholic Trans-Nationalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p400264_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While much scholarly attention has been paid to the Vatican’s actions, or lack thereof, during the Holocaust, relatively little is known of Rome’s post-war policies on Israel and the wider Israeli-Palestinian struggle. A growing scholarship has begun to examine the role played by the Holy See in its attempts to shape the post-war international system, with particular attention paid to the Vatican’s policies on the Cold War ideological divide. Central to an understanding of the Holy See’s Cold War diplomacy was the de-centralization of its policymaking process, reflective of shifting power relationships after 1945. The American Catholic Church, in particular, played a central role in the advocacy of Rome’s visions for a post-war world.
My paper examines the evolution of Vatican attitudes and policies on Israel and Palestine in the early postwar years, illuminating the means and methods of papal diplomacy in the region. It specifically examines the role of the American Church as the political and diplomatic `hammer` of Rome on the question of Israel, highlighting both the de-centralization of Vatican `power` in the postwar years, and the effects of the internationalization of the curia in the same years. From the episcopate to lay organizations, American Catholics were at the forefront of Rome`s efforts to shape both American and United Nations policies on Israel and the wider Middle East, reflecting the diffusion of the Holy See`s `power` in the postwar years, and reflective of the new realities for the increasingly global Roman Catholic Church. The relationship between the Holy See and specific national churches, in particular the American Catholic Church, is central to an understanding of the evolution of the Vatican`s political and diplomatic mission in the post war era. As such, it addresses rather broadly the issue of church and state relations in postwar America, and the extent to which the Roman Catholic Church influenced and shaped Washington’s policies, despite constitutionally entrenched divisions between faith and politics.

2010 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1319 words || 
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5. Rodriguez, Jesús. and Lee, Patrick. "From Religious Garb to Business Suits: Examining the Ways Lay Principal’s in Catholic Secondary Schools Preserve the Identity and Advance the Mission of Catholic Education" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, Oct 28, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p438038_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Catholic Education has experienced dramatic shifts in its educational leadership since the Second Vatican Council (1962-65), the historic convening of the Roman Catholic Church which led to a paradigm shift in how the Catholic Church operated in the modern world. Specific attention was paid to the role of laity in the Catholic Church and the function and future of Catholic Education within the institution of the church (Hunt, 2000). While the purpose of schooling remains distinctively Catholic, principals in secondary schools are faced with unique challenges. The first is maintaining an affordable education for families of lesser means (Carper & Hunt, 1993). Next is the question of enrolling a substantial number of students who are not members of the denomination as a means to support the school and / or to embark “on market, consumer-driven strategies” in order to preserve the institution without risking religious identity (Carper & Hunt, 1993). These two issues in particular challenge the way principals engage in Catholic education raising a critical question into how lay principals construct their identity as Catholic educational leaders. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to utilize a case study approach to examine the ways three lay principals preserve and nurture a “Catholic” culture in a secondary school setting.

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