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2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7669 words || 
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1. Kim, Jihye., Lee, Jaejin. and KIM, SOOJIN. "The Effects of Congruency, Corporate Credibility, and the Familiarity of Cause Brands for Cause-Related Marketing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 23, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p555982_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Through the attribution theory, this study investigates the value of cause related marketing (CRM) effects by constructing a mediated, theoretical design within a social network site to evaluate the effects of congruence, brand reputation and credibility, and cause brand familiarity within consumer sentiment with regard to a brand collaborating with a cause. A 2 x 2 x 2 factorial experiment design was implemented to investigate the significance of perceived motives, consumer attitudes toward a brand, and intention to spread the campaign. The study expressed the mediate model through the structural equation model (SEM). The study generated significant results from three-way interactions amongst the key variables and presents interesting implications for future CRM campaigns.

2007 - American Political Science Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 6384 words || 
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2. Meadwell, Hudson. "Explanations Without Causes and Causes Without Reasons" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, Hyatt Regency Chicago and the Sheraton Chicago Hotel and Towers, Chicago, IL, Aug 30, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p209719_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Much of the current discomfort with mainstream methodology is rooted either in outright rejection of or ambivalence toward a Humean model of causation. The Humean legacy has at least two parts, however. It is not just a question of constant conjunction. The second part of the legacy is the dualism of belief and desire (reason and the passions) which underpins a simple and influential model of instrumentalism. As it stands however, current debates about methodology, particularly the innovations of those participants who are self-consciously anti-Humean, whether in a strong or weak form, do not appear to have recognized that a full-blown challenge to the Humean legacy requires the rejection of instrumentalism and the dictum that reasons are causes, and not simply the rejection of the constant conjunction model of causation. And they therefore do not recognize that what may be left at the heart of the human sciences, when they are evacuated of the Humean legacy, are explanations without causes.

This paper examines the place of explanations without causes in the social and human sciences. First of all, do such explanations exist? Second, if they do exist, what is their logical structure? Third, what is their import? And, finally, assuming for the moment that they exist, what are their problems?

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 25 pages || Words: 5495 words || 
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3. Zajacova, Anna. and Hummer, Robert. "Gender Differences in Education Inequalities in All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality: Do Resource Substitution vs. Resource Multiplication Theories Apply?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242685_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: We present detailed analyses of gender differences in the effects of education on all-cause and cause-specific mortality. We also test whether the resource substitution vs. resource multiplication theories, recently proposed to explain gender differences in the education-mental health association, are applicable in mortality research. We use data from the 1986-2000 National Health Interview Surveys matched to the National Death Index through 2002. The analyses include 619,311 non-Hispanic white men and women born between 1906 and 1965. Proportional hazard models are employed to estimate gender differences in the effect of education on mortality. The results suggest that there are few systematic differences in education inequalities in all-cause mortality, with some trend toward a steeper gradient for men at the postsecondary levels and a steeper gradient for women at the pre-secondary levels. The gender patterns vary across specific causes of death but less so across birth cohorts. We find that the resource substitution vs. resource multiplication theories are less well suited for mortality research and propose their extension into the domain of more proximate health mediators.

2012 - The Law and Society Association Words: 502 words || 
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4. Faigman, Lisa. "Lessons of Dukes for Cause Lawyering and Social Science: When Good Causes Make “Bad Law”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village Resort, Honolulu, HI, Jun 03, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p559740_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: [T]he potential impact of Dukes on the law of class certification extends well beyond the employment discrimination context.
The above statement, written by the late Richard Nagareda prior to the Supreme Court’s cert grant in the Dukes v. Wal-mart case, has proven to be prescient beyond what even the most forward-looking prognosticators imagined. The fallout from Dukes has the potential to affect not only the certification process in class action law, but also the use of social science in class action cases and in the law more generally.
Class action scholars agree that the decision will have far-reaching impact on class certification, and many believe that it will operate (and there is evidence that it has operated) to curtail class actions well beyond the employment discrimination context. And the Court cast a penetrating and disapproving light on the social science evidence and sampling methods proffered in the case, in a way that is likely to reverberate for some time. Indeed, it could conceivably set back the cause of those who support the law’s use of high quality, scientifically rigorous social science.
Justice Scalia’s Dukes majority opinion has been loudly bemoaned by plaintiffs’ class action lawyers of all stripes, and has led to passionate debate in social science circles, as the dust settles and the landscape is surveyed.
Viewed through a critical lens, the Dukes case might be characterized as the wrong class constituted in the wrong case against the wrong defendant, using the wrong science. We will discuss the ways the attorneys and social scientists involved in the Dukes case may have overreached, and pose some questions and challenges to our respective professions.
On the law side: What responsibility, if any, do “cause lawyers” have to make strategic decisions with an eye on all the foreseeable potential consequences, for their own clients and for future clients hoping to use the same legal avenues for relief? What risks attach to the use of novel legal theories in high profile cases that will receive careful scrutiny? Is there a line between advocacy for just causes and the proper use of the law in the service of discrete clients or well-constituted classes of clients, and if so, are lawyers actively and adequately challenging themselves to remain on the proper side of that line?
And on the social science side: What are the perils involved in offering opinions that either skate too close to the edge of scientific validity or arguably include scientifically suspect inferential leaps? What responsibilities do social scientists have to their attorney “clients” to explain the ways their proffered opinions might be challenged? Should social scientists in particular be careful to offer only opinions that comport with the level of scientific rigor they employ in their peer-reviewed manuscripts, in order to avoid being labeled practitioners and purveyors of “soft” science? If they do not, how does this bode for the future of the use and acceptance of social science by the law?

2017 - American Society of Criminology Words: 190 words || 
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5. Steketee, Majone., Aussems, Claire. and Enzmann, Dirk. "Parental Maltreatment as the Causes of the Causes of Youth Delinquency" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Philadelphia Marriott Downtown, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-11 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1277312_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: There is extensive research showing how childhood exposure to violence and maltreatment in the family increases the risk of subsequent victimization and delinquent behaviour and attitudes. The first results of the ISRD-study show that parents’ violence and harsh physical treatment of children have an influence on violent and other delinquent behaviour of youth. Within the Situational Action Theory Theory (Wikström), these influences may be considered as the “causes of the causes.” In this paper we present the preliminary outcomes of the multi-national ISRD-3 study on how the relation between children’s experience of physical maltreatment by parents an delinquency can be understood within the Situational Action theory.
We speculate that parental reliance on physical discipline (ranging from milder forms such as a slap on the bottom to more extreme forms which may be viewed as child abuse) are correlated with morality and self-control of young people. Because these youngsters may avoid spending time at home, parental use of physical force may also have an effect on exposure to delinquent opportunities. Our general contention is that this relationship will be observed cross-nationally, allowing for national variations in the magnitude of this relationship.

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