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2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 119 words || 
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1. Riopelle, Cameron. and Muniandy, Parthiban. "Drones, Maps and Crescents: CBS News’ Symbolic Construction of the Middle East" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558039_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Recently on CBS world news online, we noticed an increased reliance on graphics inset in news articles in place of photojournalism, particularly in articles about Middle Eastern conflicts. What are emergent patterns of this change? By analyzing visual symbolism present in these graphics, we discuss a number of distinct patterns. We interpret these patterns by examining disconnections in the article between the visual and written text; the use of an image bank in composing these images; the de-contextualization of maps as out of place; the conflation of Islam and the Middle East through the juxtaposition of Islamic symbols with those of current military conflicts; the prevalence and influence of Arab exceptionalism; and lastly the representation of Islam as monolithic.

2012 - BEA Words: 193 words || 
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2. Conway, Mike. "CBS Experimentation During Television’s First Boom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p544026_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Abstract: Historians have mostly defined television’s first boom period (late 1920s through early 1930s) by the inventors and companies involved in improving the technology: John Logie Baird, Philo Farnsworth, C. Francis Jenkins, Vladimir Zworykin, RCA, Westinghouse, among others.
But the very reason Columbia Broadcasting System’s first television station, W2XAB, is given little attention during this period (lack of technological innovation) is also why the effort is important in understanding the evolution of television programming. Since CBS wasn’t financially vested in a specific format, the company concentrated its efforts on the programming it offered.
Even though the camera could only “see” a 12-square-foot area, W2XAB presented a wide variety of programming that would become staples of future mass medium, including boxing, music, public affairs, vaudeville, and election returns. CBS experimented with early interactivity by presenting the same live program on successive nights with lighting or scenery differences and asking the viewers to give their opinions.
CBS’s mechanical station only offered programming for 17 months between 1931 and 1933, but the emphasis on the program over the technology would foreshadow how Columbia approached television when it finally became a commercial medium in the next decade.

2012 - BEA Pages: unavailable || Words: 3865 words || 
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3. Allman, Roger. "Too Fat to Love: Size Issues and Sizeism in CBS's "Mike and Molly"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, Apr 15, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p545570_index.html>
Publication Type: Open Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 2010, “Mike and Molly" debuted on CBS. The show features a burgeoning love story between a Chicago policeman and an elementary school teacher, and became noteworthy in the media due to the fact that the program had an unusual aspect, or at least unusual for network primetime television; both Mike and Molly were fat. In fact, the show courted controversy even before it aired, and while the network claimed the program was progressive, many claimed it was either discriminatory or aesthetically abhorrent. This report looks at the pilot episode of this interesting comedy in an attempt to discover whether or not the program is truly groundbreaking, or plays upon the same prejudicial stereotypes normally associated with fat characters in American fictive media.

2011 - BEA Words: 36 words || 
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4. Conway, Mike. "Origins of Television News In America: The Visualizers of CBS In the 1940s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p482122_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper/Presentation
Abstract: Mike Conway, author of the new book the "Origins of Television News In America: The Visualizers of CBS In the 1940s" will talk about how the small CBS staff developed the television newscast in the 1940s.

2012 - BEA Words: 123 words || 
Info
5. Allman, Roger. "Too Fat to Love: Size Issues and Sizeism in CBS's "Mike and Molly"" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the BEA, Las Vegas Hilton, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-09-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p545310_index.html>
Publication Type: General Paper Submission
Abstract: In 2010, “Mike and Molly" debuted on CBS. The show features a burgeoning love story between a Chicago policeman and an elementary school teacher, and became noteworthy in the media due to the fact that the program had an unusual aspect, or at least unusual for network primetime television; both Mike and Molly were fat. In fact, the show courted controversy even before it aired, and while the network claimed the program was progressive, many claimed it was either discriminatory or aesthetically abhorrent. This report looks at the pilot episode of this interesting comedy in an attempt to discover whether or not the program is truly groundbreaking, or plays upon the same prejudicial stereotypes normally associated with fat characters in American fictive media.

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