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2007 - Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium Words: 197 words || 
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1. Li-Ying, Sung., Shaorong, Gao., Shen, Hongmei., Yu, Hui., Song, Yifang., Smith, Sadie., Tuck, David., Inoue, Kimiko., Weissman, Sherman., Tian, X. Cindy., Yang, Xiangzhong. and Cheng, Tao. "Are differentiated cells more efficient than adult stem cells for somatic cell cloning?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium, TBA, Hartford Connecticut, Mar 27, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p193635_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Abstract: Animal cloning using adult somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) have been reported in numerous mammalian species. However, it is still uncertain whether animal clones, such as “Dolly”, are derived from adult stem-cell like cells or differentiated somatic cells. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1-5%) is that the clones were derived from adult stem cells, which are present in an extremely small fraction in most adult tissues. Support for this hypothesis is that cloning efficiency for term development using embryonic stem (ES) cells as nuclear donors is 5-10 times higher than that for somatic cells. Additionally, cloned pups could not be produced directly from nuclei of differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains: are SCNT-derived animal clones derived from truly differentiated somatic cells? We directly compared the developmental potential of cloned embryos from differentiated cells versus adult stem cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes (97.5~99.4% purity). We found terminally differentiated post-mitotic granulocytes had the highest efficiency for cloning and yielded cloned pups. More studies are required to determine whether this trend is reversed in other cell lineages or under modified conditions.

2009 - Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium Words: 260 words || 
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2. Brewer, Molly., Li, Zhong., Wu, Qian., Meng, Fanliang., Sun, Guiqin., Zhang, Sui. and Zou, Changping. "Comparison of Stem Cell Array in Ovarian Cells and CD133/CD44 Cells Purified from Human Tumors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Connecticut's Stem Cell Research International Symposium, Omni Hotel, New Haven, CT, Mar 23, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p364764_index.html>
Publication Type: Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic cancer. Multimodality treatment results in a complete clinical remission for more than 80% of the women, but this remission is typically short-lived and most (>70%) women will ultimately succumb to a lethal recurrence of their disease. Factor(s) associated with disease recurrence not well understood. Using immunostaining and FACS analysis, we selected different cell populations from patient tumor samples using 2 different cancer stem cell markers. Stem cell pluripotency arrays were performed to compare immortalized ovarian epithelium cells (IOSE), ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells and CD133-positive/negative, CD44-positive/negative, and double positive/negative cell population purified from patient tumors. CD133+ cells had the highest expression of stemness gene CD9. IOSE and CD44+ cells had the highest expression of cellular retinoid binding protein CRABP2 level. Stemness genes NOG and PTEN were increased in IOSE and CD133+, CD44+ and double positive cell population and decreased in SKOV3 cells. Furthermore, the maintenance of pluripotency genes NANOG, POU5F1 and SOX2 had higher expression level in purified cells than that of IOSE and SKOV3 cells. In conclusion, CD133+ cells isolated from human tumors at the time of surgery had the highest expression level of stemness gene CD9 compared with other cell populations and ovarian cells. Both CD133 and CD44 positive cell population had higher level of expression of maintenance of pluripotency genes compared with cultured cells. CD133+ cells had more stemness features than other marker positive cells isolated from human tumor and cell culture in the array study. (Supported by University of Connecticut, Carole and Ray Neag Comprehensive Cancer Center Start up fund.).

2015 - 4S Annual Meeting – Denver Words: 249 words || 
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3. Sheoran, Nayantara. "From regulator frameworks to scientific publications: Bio-crossing from embryonic stem cell to somatic cells." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 4S Annual Meeting – Denver, Sheraton Downtown, Denver, CO, Nov 11, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1036267_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As the research that drives stem cell therapy crosses the terrain of embryonic stem cells and moves towards cells derived and developed from somatic cells, we as research scholars should examine this form of “bio-crossing” of cellular forms. This “bio-crossing,” is only but a latest development in the science of stem cell research and therapy; however, it does become indicative of the fact that cellular science, is far from stabilizing anytime soon; but rather is in a perpetual state of movement and crossing(s) onto other terrains. For this paper, I look at the two forces that drive the latest crossing over from embryonic stem cell to somatic cells (both autologous and allogeneic) in India and its myriad implications for not only the science but also therapy seekers and providers. This crossing over can first be attributed to the regulatory frameworks within India that draw on global regulatory frameworks rather than local realities, which privileges “safer” forms of cellular research and therapy over embryonic stem-cell research. Second, this crossing over makes clear the impact of international scientific journals, which in and-of themselves are involved in multiple bio-crossings even before the first print reaches the readers. The international stem cell research community self-regulated and crossed over from embryonic to somatic cell therapy based on nature of benefits and safety of non-embryonic cells. The perpetual local and global bio-crossings of stem cell research and therapy allow for an exploration of how internal self-regulation and external state-regulation create and impact new cellular terrains.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 15 pages || Words: 6306 words || 
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4. Martin, Aryn. "Cell sociology: Fetal cells from instruments to actors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p23427_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this paper, I place fetal cells recovered from women's blood at the center of a story about scientific and clinical communities of investigators who have, since 1969, been trying to make something useful of them. In their early history, fetal cells weren’t intentional actors. Their presence in women’s blood was neither surprising nor terribly interesting except insofar as it could be instrumentalized: fetal cells suggested a potentially lucrative way to ‘see inside’ the fetus without having to violate the amniotic sac. In about 1993, however, a number of social, linguistic and experimental factors coincided to bring about intentional fetal cells. They became vivified when they were found to persist in women’s bodies post-pregnancy. Pregnant and post-pregnant women were newly characterized as “chimeras” akin to transplant recipients. Fetal cells, in this new immunological model, became “foreign” entities “trafficking” into women’s bodies and causing diseases previously thought of as autoimmune. This paper tracks the animation of fetal cells, and their uneasy place in a number of research agendas.

2003 - American Association for Public Opinion Research Words: 216 words || 
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5. Jones, Lester. and Ames, Dan. "Survey of Cell Phone Users: Identifying Cell Phone Only Households" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, Sheraton Music City, Nashville, TN, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-08-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p116358_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study was a pilot test to increase our understanding of known cell phone users and their likelihood of inclusion in current RDD sample frame. Four main concerns were identified:

1. Estimate cell phone users’ willingness to participate in surveys.
2. Quantify the extent to which cell phone users may not be included in regular RDD sample frames.
3. Quantify the extent to which cell phone users are reachable using landlines.
4. Identify the characteristics of cell phone users who may not be reachable using traditional landlines.

The study design focused more on what could reasonably be done within the parameters of a cell-phone conversation with the risks of disconnects, static and unknown response rates instead of a comprehensive study of users characteristics and behaviors. At the same time, the data collection methodology had to stay within the guidelines of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, which prohibits unsolicited calls to cell phones under certain guidelines.

A random sample of known cell phone numbers were selected from Maryland, New York and California where only dedicated to wireless services exchanges are assigned. A short three minute paper script survey was used for a target of 200 completes. Following state laws and the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, the sample was hand dialed by interviewers and a paper script was used for data collection.

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