Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 4,903 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 981 - Next  Jump:
2008 - National Women's Studies Association Words: 1 words || 
Info
1. Ludlow, Jeannie. "“Woman Troubles: Twenty-first Century Abortion Rhetoric and Nineteenth-century Abortion Practice”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the National Women's Studies Association, Millennium Hotel, Cincinnati, OH, <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p233013_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript

2014 - ISTR 11th Annual Conference Words: 465 words || 
Info
2. Adam, Thomas. "What were the Influences of the State and the Market on the fate of Endowments in Germany from the sixteenth century to the twentieth century?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISTR 11th Annual Conference, University of Muenster, Muenster, Germany, <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p706694_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The nineteenth century saw an explosion in the number of endowments and foundations created and the amounts of money given for charitable and philanthropic purposes. The men and women who provided the funding for endowments entrusted to city governments, universities, high schools, and museums had very clear and precise visions about the purpose of their endowments, the administration of the funds provided, and the duration of these funds. Common to all endowments was the desire of their creators that these endowments should last for eternity. In some cases, donors imposed conditions on their gift that interest on the capital donated had to be accrued for years, decades, or even centuries before any income could be spend on the purpose of the endowment. Donors clearly expected their endowments to last, the state to provide for an environment that secured the future existence of their endowments, and the institutions in charge of administering the endowments to do everything to safeguard the funds provided.
With the arrival of endowments and foundations created with money and not property, philanthropy depended on the state and the capital markets for its success. Stable political conditions were as much a precondition for a flourishing philanthropic culture as a financial market that provided opportunities for the profitable investment of philanthropic funds. Philanthropy cannot exist independent and disconnected from the state and the market. My paper will explore this relationship and provide in analysis of this relationship.
Yet, donors sometimes were also aware of potential political and social change that might have an impact on the future of their endowments. Donors who created endowments at the University of Breslau, to take just one example, provided detailed instructions for the fate of their endowments should this university ever cease to exist. In this case, the endowments were to be transferred to other institutions of higher education. The fate of the foundations for the University of Cologne and the high schools of that city as a result of the French occupation at the beginning of the nineteenth century highlights the potential danger for the continued existence of endowments. What happens if a state institution that is entrusted with endowments is closed?
Many historians prefer to blame inflation of the 1920s for the downfall and destruction of German philanthropy. And while there is no doubt that financial disaster and war had a devastating impact on philanthropy, neither can explain sufficiently the recovering of philanthropy after such events. From the Thirty Years War to World War II, foundations and endowments were among the victims of destruction. However, it appears that government policies had a greater impact on the destruction of philanthropic institutions than war and inflation. German governments seem to have used the financial resources stored away in the assets of endowments and foundations to rid themselves of their accumulated debts.

2013 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 1153 words || 
Info
3. Sauers, Nick. and Richardson, Jayson. "Twitter: A 21st Century Tool for 21st Century Principals" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Hyatt Regency, Indianapolis, IN, Nov 04, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p674124_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Modern digital technologies offer various channels for communication. This channel could be asynchronous, one to one, one to many, or interactive. One modern technology that allows for a variety of ways to communicate is Twitter. This study will analyze the ways school leaders use Twitter as a communication tool and tool for collaboration. The researchers identified principals who were using Twitter and then carefully examined the ways that they were using this communication tool.

2006 - International Studies Association Words: 173 words || 
Info
4. Klaphake, Jay. "21st Century Teaching for 21st Century Students: Globalized Active Learning for Active Global Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Town & Country Resort and Convention Center, San Diego, California, USA, Mar 22, 2006 <Not Available>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p98834_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Understanding and addressing the North-South divide in the globalized classroom of the 21st century requires students and teachers alike to bridge the knowledge, as well as the technology divides. Increasingly, studying abroad as part of the university experience is becoming the rule, rather than the exception. As a result, students and teachers from the North, South, East and West, find themselves seated next to each other in the globalized international studies classroom. Many of todays "techno-tasking" students are are able to multi-task in ways that some of their teachers and classmates can hardly imagine. "Digital students" are being taught by teachers who are "digital immigrants." The resulting cultural, linguistic, knowledge, and technology gaps, call for changes in teaching and require greater efforts to integrate technology and active learning into the classroom. Drawing on examples from university international studies courses in law and politics, this paper will discuss how multimedia, interactive response systems, simulations, and other collaborative methods can be utilized in the globalized active learning classroom to foster 21st century active global citizens

2011 - ATE Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 691 words || 
Info
5. Quick, Beth. "Preparing Educators to Meet 21st Century Learners wtih 21st Century Technologies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ATE Annual Meeting, Caribe Royale Hotel, Orlando, Florida, Feb 09, 2011 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p438448_index.html>
Publication Type: Multiple Paper Format
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This session will explore the characteristics of today's K-12 students and strategies for preparing teachers to effectively use technology to engage their interest and empower today's students as learners.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 981 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy