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2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 101 words || 
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1. Zorn, Theodore. "Controlling and resisting change agendas: Change logics and the discursive struggle for control of organizational change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366607_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Critically oriented approaches to discourse and change focus on issues such as power and tensions in the process of organizational change. From this perspective, communication may be seen as, for example, the process in which organizational members struggle for preferred constructions of change-related phenomena. For example, researchers have demonstrated how certain communication practices serve a hegemonic function in change processes and how tensions are reflected and constructed in CRC. This paper uses the notion of “change logics” to explore change processes in two nonprofit organizations in New Zealand. It demonstrates how discourse was used strategically to advance and resist change agendas.

2004 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 43 pages || Words: 21050 words || 
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2. Stults, Brian. and Winters, Richard. "Changing Taxes, Changing Votes, Changing Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Inter-Continental Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Jan 08, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p68121_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Both pooled aggregate analysis of the American states (Kone and Winters, 1993) and cross-sectional individual-level analysis of election exit polls in the states (Niemi et al., 1995) established weak negative impacts of changing taxes on subsequent vote outcomes and voter behavior. Our research investigates the impact of legislated changes in the sales, income, and “sin” taxes on individual voting using exit polls from 43 states in 228 elections from 1982-2000 yielding about 315,000 respondents. We hypothesize conditions that affect the tax-vote linkage. We find stronger negative effects of changes in the sales tax on vote choice, but little or no impact of changes in either the income or sin taxes. Some other non-obvious findings of the paper include: Republican candidates defending tax records do worse than Democratic candidates, a trait that appears concentrated among open seat Republicans. By decomposing into types of taxes changed, it appears that Republicans are particularly sensitive to sales tax changes, especially if an incumbent, and open seat Republicans to their party-predecessor’s income tax changes. Of the impact of tax changes on voters, there appears to be little variation in the impact of tax changes on lower or upper income classes nor by party identification of the voter.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Words: 120 words || 
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3. Buthe, Tim. "To Change or not to Change: The Resistance of International Institutions to Change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p181448_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: International institutions should reflect the distribution of power at the time of their creation, and they should evolve and change to reflect changes in that distribution of power over time. Realist IR theory explicitly expects such adaptation to be swift, virtually automatic, and nearly complete. Liberal and constructivist IR theories often lead to the same expectations, albeit arguably with a longer delay. Yet in practice, many international institutions fail to change in ways that would reflect the current distribution of power. Why? Theorizing institutions not just as structures, but themselves as agents/actors, this paper hopes to contribute to a better understanding of institutional persistence and change. Empirically, it will examine the resistance to chance in international standards-setting and regulatory institutions.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10809 words || 
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4. Tranby, Eric. and Kelly, Erin. "Changing Workplaces, Changing Work Behaviors: Does a Flexibility Initiative Change Where and When People Work?*" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p651526_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many organizations have adopted flexible work arrangements such as flextime, telecommuting, compressed work weeks, and reduced-hours schedules to, in part, help workers cope with work-family conflicts. However, they are often administered as individual accommodations and, consequently, have low levels of utilization. We investigate the effects of a workplace initiative that emphasizes flexibility for all employees. Using multilevel longitudinal data on 659 employees, we explore the effect of this initiative on flexible work behaviors, including employee’s location of work, work schedule, and work schedule demands. We examine for differential effects by gender and parental status, proximal team characteristics, and supervisor statuses. We find that employees who participate in the initiative are significantly more likely to change to more flexible work schedules, begin telecommuting, and feel less pressure to work overtime. These effects are moderated by parental status, workteam pressures, and supervisor characteristics.

2004 - The Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 44 pages || Words: 21094 words || 
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5. Winters, Richard. "Changing Taxes, Changing Votes,Changing Elections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Apr 15, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-04-23 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p82535_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Taxes are raised frequently enough in the American
states so that increasing confidence should be vested in answers to the
questions of when and under what conditions gubernatorial candidates
face electoral retribution for increasing taxes. Aggregate analysis
(Kone and Winters 1993) and individual-level analysis of election exit
polls (Niemi, et al. 1995) have established weak negative impacts of
changing taxes on subsequent vote outcomes. Our research investigates
the tax-change impact on individual voting using exit polls in 228
elections from 1982-2000 with about 315,000 respondents. We hypothesize
conditions that affect the tax-vote
linkage. We find strong negative effects of changes in the sales tax on
vote choice, but little or no impact of changes in either the income
tax or “sin” taxes on the vote. Some other non-obvious findings of the
paper include: nonincumbent candidates of the “taxing party” are more
vulnerable than incumbents; voter retribution varies by party, tax, and
incumbency; the voter characteristic of higher incomes interacts
nonobviously with tax changes and the vote; party of voter seems not to
enhance punitive behavior, and, finally, given our measure of the
“fiscal health” of states, voters are more likely to punish “taxers” in
economically hard times.

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