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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Words: 307 words || 
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1. Stromback, Jesper. and Esser, Frank. "Changing media technologies, changing news media logic: Understanding the changing dynamics of the mediatization of politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1105207_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: While the institutionalization of media logic in other societal subsystems has been described as the “core of mediatization” (Schrott, 2009, p. 42), and most mediatization scholars agree that media logic is key to understand processes of mediatization, there is still no consensus about the concept of media logic (Landerer, 2013; Lundby, 2009). Not only do different scholars conceptualize media logic differently, there is also disagreement as to whether media logic should be understood as a singular logic or rather as media logics. In addition, many questions remain about how new digital and social media might reshape media logic and, in extension, the dynamics of the interaction between media logic and the logic of other societal subsystems such as politics (Klinger & Svensson, 2015).
In this paper we will focus on one variant of media logic, namely news media logic. From a new institutionalist perspective it has been proposed that news media logic consists of three key dimensions: journalistic professionalism, media commercialism and applied media technologies (Esser, 2013; Strömbäck & Esser, 2014). This implies that news media logic has a partly dynamic character: when journalistic professionalism, media commercialism and/or applied media technologies change, so does media logic and, in extension, the interaction between news media logic and the logic of other societal subsystems. This might then have important implications for, among other things, the mediatization of politics.
Against this background, the purpose of this paper is to analyze how the increasing importance of digital and social media influences news media logic and, in extension, the interactions between news media logic and political logic and the mediatization of politics. Taking into account all three dimensions of news media logic (journalistic professionalism, media commercialism and applied media technologies), the key questions to be addressed are how changing media technologies are reshaping news media logic and the dynamics of the mediatization of politics.

2019 - APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition Words: 163 words || 
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2. Hopkins, Daniel., Hill, Seth. and Huber, Gregory. "Changing Demographics, Changing Votes? Local Demographic Changes and Vote Choice" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Annual Meeting & Exhibition, Marriott Wardman Park, the Omni Shoreham, and the Hilton Washington, Washington, DC, <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1524050_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In recent years, the immigration issue and broader questions of demographic change have become highly salient in American politics, and some scholarship connects these issues with Donald Trump's unexpected 2016 victory. One strand of prior research indicates that local influxes of immigrants or unfamiliar ethnic groups can generate threatened political responses in the affected communities. In this paper, we examine whether local demographic changes helped drive Trump's 2016 general election victory. To do so, we compile a novel precinct-level data set for six key states, including precinct-level turnout measures generated through the voter file. We also use the voter file data to accurately weight Census data, providing us with a rich set of precinct-level demographic measures. In total, this procedure provides us with a data set of more than 27,000 precincts from Florida, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. Overall, our analyses uncover little evidence that communities which experienced influxes of Latino/a residents were more likely to shift to the GOP in 2016.

2009 - NCA 95th Annual Convention Words: 101 words || 
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3. Zorn, Theodore. "Controlling and resisting change agendas: Change logics and the discursive struggle for control of organizational change" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 95th Annual Convention, Chicago Hilton & Towers, Chicago, IL, <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p366607_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Critically oriented approaches to discourse and change focus on issues such as power and tensions in the process of organizational change. From this perspective, communication may be seen as, for example, the process in which organizational members struggle for preferred constructions of change-related phenomena. For example, researchers have demonstrated how certain communication practices serve a hegemonic function in change processes and how tensions are reflected and constructed in CRC. This paper uses the notion of “change logics” to explore change processes in two nonprofit organizations in New Zealand. It demonstrates how discourse was used strategically to advance and resist change agendas.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Words: 79 words || 
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4. Tomell-Presto, Jessica. "Changing Movement, Changing Dancers, Changing Identity: The Potential for Dance to Maintain or (Re)Negotiate Cultural Identity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2020-01-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p426299_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: According to Anne Cooper Albright in Choreographing Difference, “we can further our understandings of how social identities are signaled, formed, and negotiated through bodily movement.” This paper will explore how Irish dance constitutes identity and consider how bodily movement becomes a marker of tradition and authenticity. It asks, “what if this movement is expected to remain static and uncontested to maintain a particular cultural identity? Is it still possible to be creative, change movements, and (re)negotiate identity?”

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