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2017 - DSI Annual Meeting Words: 43 words || 
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1. Xu, Xun. and Jackson, Jonathan. "Channel Selection Intentions for Purchases in an Omni-Channel Retail Setting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the DSI Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington DC, <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1285719_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: With the rapid development of e-commerce and omni-channel supply chains, customers are now facing more distribution channels options when purchasing products. Via empirical analysis, we identify the key characteristics that influence a customer’s channel selection intention and use them to derive managerial implications.

2014 - International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9614 words || 
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2. Shaw, Allison., Dolan, Emily., Mukherjee, Tanuka. and Xu, Weiai. "Face Threatening Acts Effects on Channel Selection: An Examination Into Politeness Theory and Communication Channel" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 64th Annual Conference, Seattle Sheraton Hotel, Seattle, Washington, May 21, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p716230_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigated the decision making process involved in committing positive and negative face threatening acts (FTAs) and examined whether people would commit FTAs in a manner other than face-to-face communication (i.e., phone or text messaging). It was hypothesized that when communicating a positive FTAs Ps’ concern for providing social cues would increase and therefore Ps would select a channel that would allow them to do just that. It was hypothesized that when communicating a negative FTAs Ps’ concern for offering receiver control would increase and therefore Ps would select a channel that would allow them to do just that. Results indicated that the presence of social cues was an important factor when deciding upon a channel to select for both positive and negative FTAs. Findings from this study extend politeness theory to the channel selections made by senders of FTAs.

2005 - International Studies Association Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9447 words || 
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3. Wanis-St. John, Anthony. "Back Channel Diplomacy: Secret Channels and Negotiation Analysis in Palestinian-Israeli Peacemaking" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association, Hilton Hawaiian Village, Honolulu, Hawaii, Mar 05, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p69513_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Back channel diplomacy (BCD) refers to official negotiations conducted in secret among the parties to a dispute or even between a party and a third party intervenor, which complement front channels, and are potentially at variance with declared policies. Aspects of secrecy in negotiation have been the subject of descriptive and prescriptive literature. Research specifically focused on the strategic interaction of multiple channels of international negotiation-front and back channels-did not exist. In this study, the cases of Palestinian-Israeli peace negotiations from 1991 to 2003 are rigorously analyzed according to a theoretical framework designed to understand what BCD is, and how it works. This helps us understand why decisionmakers choose to use it. The framework looks at the treatment of the issues negotiated, the role of secrecy, the exclusion of subparties that results from secrecy, the role of third party intervenors, the proximity of decisionmakers to the negotiators, and the strategic interaction of multiple channels (front and back). The overarching condition is that of incrementalist peace negotiations, which proceed from early agreements on principles, to interim accords and finally to a permanent settlement. Decisionmakers use BCD to advance their policies and manage four critical uncertainties that affect their negotiations in violent international conflicts. The uncertainties regard the i) cost of entry into negotiations, ii) effect of spoilers in the peace process, iii) the lack of information on other parties' interests and preferences that is needed to make the decision to negotiate, and iv) political impact of negotiation outcome on the decisionmakers. In helping to manage these uncertainties, BCD is associated with the achievement of early breakthrough agreements where front channels fail. However, under the condition of the incrementalist peace process requiring progressively more difficult implementation, BCD's inherent qualities of secrecy and the consequent exclusion turn problematic. The ability of decisionmakers to conclude accords before spoilers can mobilize against them is progressively diminished, until BCD no longer helps the parties reach agreement, but becomes a substitute for good faith negotiation and ultimately, yields negative returns. The potential exists for renewal of violent conflict.

2007 - NCA 93rd Annual Convention Pages: 27 pages || Words: 6570 words || 
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4. Keaten, James., Kelly, Lynne., Pribyl, Charles. and Sakamoto, Masahiro. "Fear and Competence in Japan and the U.S.: Fear of Negative Evaluation, Affect for Communication Channels, Channel Competence and Use of Computer Mediated Communication" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 93rd Annual Convention, TBA, Chicago, IL, Nov 15, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p191942_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This cross-cultural investigation examines the relationship between fear of negative evaluation, affect for communication channels (i.e., email versus face-to-face), and self-reports of communication competence. Participants from both Japan (N = 146) and the United States (N = 325) responded to three scales, Fear of Negative Evaluation (Leary, 1983), Affect for Communication Channels Scale (Kelly & Keaten, 2005), and a measure of communication competence. Cross-cultural differences were discovered on reports of fear of negative evaluation, CMC use, and self-reported competence. The factors predicting channel usage in a difficult personal situation (e.g., competence and general email usage), however, were quite similar across Japanese and U.S. participants.

2005 - International Communication Association Pages: 28 pages || Words: 5695 words || 
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5. Dutta-Bergman, Mohan. and Jiang, Min. "The Relationship Between E-government Use and Political Participation Through Traditional Channels: The Theory of Channel Complementarity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton New York, New York City, NY, Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p14652_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The exponential growth of the Internet has been accompanied by the use of the information by government agencies and offices to reach out to the members of the public. E-government has become a critical component in the literature on online communication, with specific inferences made about the ability of the medium to foster democratic participation, economic growth and better communication between the government and the public. In spite of the growing literature on e-government, little research has been conducted about the relationship between the use of e-government and the use of more traditional media to connect with the government. Based on the theory of channel complementarity, this article compares the users of e-government with non-users to suggest that the users of the online platform will be more likely to communicate with the government via traditional platforms as compared to non-users.

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