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2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 5920 words || 
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1. Danaher, William. and Dixon, Marc. "Discourse and Dignity: The Case of the 1969 Charleston Hospital Worker’s Strike" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1008878_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: We investigate how employer countermobilization may take the form of discursive obstruction, rhetoric designed to delegitimize worker grievance claims, by investigating the 1969 Hospital Workers Strike. Discursive tactics by multiple actors, both allies and opponents, are shown to water down worker messages through an analysis of newspapers, interviews, and archival materials. In our case study, worker messages focusing on worker dignity compete with claims from allies more narrowly focused on wages or social justice frames. Discursive obstruction by employers is effective, yet must compete with larger societal messages of social justice that dilute management claims of bureaucratic fairness.

2003 - American Sociological Association Words: 252 words || 
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2. Bures, Regina. "Living with History: Dimensions of Gentrification and Social Change in Charleston, South Carolina" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta Hilton Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Aug 16, 2003 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p106277_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Few studies have considered the social and historical factors associated with urban redevelopment and gentrification in Southern cities. This paper examines the relationship between increases in both gentrification and historic preservation in Charleston, SC. An old southern city with a history of low segregation, Charleston’s historic preservation movement emerged in the early 20th century. The early preservationists actively sought to limit the development of new structures in the peninsular city. By the mid-20th century, Charleston’s downtown was in decline and changing race relations were leading to increasing segregation. Today, Charleston is a vibrant city where “history lives.” Using tract-level data from the 1970 to 2000 Censuses, we describe the relationship between these urban processes (gentrification and preservation) and multiple dimensions of changing segregation (racial, economic, education, and nativity). Linking the social and spatial dimensions of urban change allows us to evaluate the impact of gentrification on the social and economic characteristics of city residents as well as the location of different groups in the city. The extent to which urban redevelopment and gentrification contribute to racial and economic segregation in US cities is an ongoing source of debate among urban sociologists. While gentrification is usually described in terms of the physical and social changes that result, the characteristics of social change associated with gentrification vary from place to place. This suggests that studies of the context of gentrification, particularly in the South, may contribute to urban theory as well as urban policy.

2008 - 93rd Annual Convention Words: 193 words || 
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3. Marshall, Amani. "Performing Freedom: Enslaved Women Runaways in Antebellum Charleston" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 93rd Annual Convention, Sheraton Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, Oct 01, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p275615_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Abstract: Using the narrative of Ellen and William Craft’s escape from slavery, together with a database of 2,400 runaway slave advertisements published in antebellum South Carolina newspapers, this paper examines the ways in which enslaved women exploited whites’ notions of race and freedom to pass as free. Despite efforts of the slaveholding class to create clear-cut racial definitions to regulate status in the antebellum South, enslaved women understood that the lines of race and class were often permeable. Exploiting the connection between skin color and freedom, acculturated runaways engaged in intricate performances in which they used dress, language, and employment skills to cross the lines of class, race, and sometimes gender, in order to pass as free. Rather than strike out for the North, the majority of female runaways remained in the South where they created free identities that enabled them to secure employment, enjoy mobility, and maintain kinship ties, if only temporarily. Considering freedom as more than a legal status, but rather as a state of mind, this study concludes that enslaved women experienced freedom the moment they appropriated the clothing, language, and posture of whites, and left their owners as free people.

2017 - 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History Words: 66 words || 
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4. Brown, Barrye. "The College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 102nd Annual Meeting and Conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza Hotel, Cincinnati, OH, <Not Available>. 2019-09-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1285393_index.html>
Publication Type: Abstract
Abstract: Barrye Brown, Reference and Outreach Archivist, will discuss the history of the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture which was formerly the Avery Normal Institute, a school for black Charlestonians established by the American Missionary Association in 1865. Utilizing digitized materials from collections, Avery created an informative digital exhibit on the history of the school featured on the Lowcountry Digital History Initiative.

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