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2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 120 words || 
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1. Shami, Muna. and Nasser, Ilham. "Assessing the field of early childhood education in Palestine through the lens of early childhood education supervisors" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p958546_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This presentation will share the results of a study conducted recently (May, 2014) in the West Bank Territory. The focus of the study is the group of sixteen supervisors in charge of the operation of preschools whether government or privately run as part of the Ministry of Education and Higher Education in Palestine. Using surveys, the participants provided information about their educational backgrounds, roles, and responsibilities. In addition, they participated in a ninety minutes focus group discussion on their views and main challenges. The results highlight the aspirations and struggles of the supervisors who function in an environment that lacks the governmental, community, and parental support of the ECE sector and the needed resources to make an impact in preschools.

2017 - Association of Teacher Educators Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Reinking, Anni. "Multicultural Education Practices in Early Childhood Classrooms: Implications for Early Childhood and Elementary Classrooms" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association of Teacher Educators, Orlando Caribe Royale, Orlando, Florida, Feb 10, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1164236_index.html>
Publication Type: Emerging Scholars Series
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This session discusses research that focused on how teachers viewed multicultural education in their classrooms as well as how they implemented it in in their classrooms. The findings from this study support other research studies, but also has interesting action plans participants suggested at the end of the study.

2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 158 words || 
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3. Nikulina, Valentina. and Widom, Cathy. "The Role of Childhood Neglect and Childhood Poverty in Predicting Mental Health, Academic Performance, and Criminal Behavior in Adulthood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432207_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study assesses the independent contributions of childhood neglect and childhood poverty (family and neighborhood) as predictors of adult outcomes (posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), academic performance, and criminal behavior). Using a prospective cohort design, 1,005 children with documented histories of neglect (N =507) and matched controls (N =497) were followed up and interviewed in young adulthood. Official criminal histories, census tract and interview data were used to assess outcomes. Data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling to control for neighborhood clustering. Results showed that childhood neglect predicted PTSD, arrests, and academic performance; family poverty predicted PTSD, MDD, arrests and academic performance; and neighborhood poverty predicted PTSD, arrests and academic achievement. Childhood neglect moderated the relations among childhood poverty and outcomes such that poverty was related to negative outcomes in the control, but not neglect group. This study highlights the importance of assessing childhood experiences in broad contexts, including the family and neighborhood.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 504 words || 
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4. August, Elana., Stack, Dale., Barrieau, Lindsey., Mantis, Irene., Belisle-Cuillerier, Joelle., Serbin, Lisa., Ledingham, Jane. and Schwartzman, Alex. "Emotion Regulation in A High-Risk Middle Childhood Sample: Relation to Maternal Childhood Behaviour and Dimensions of Parenting" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p951590_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Emotion regulation, the ability to modulate emotional responses, is a key developmental challenge. Poor emotion regulation abilities are linked to the development of problematic behaviour (Gardner et al., 2008). The majority of measures of emotion regulation have been constructed within normative developmental frameworks (Raver, 2004) and applied predominantly to preschoolers (Bridges et al., 2004). The present study was designed to examine these abilities in high-risk school-aged children using a systematic observational tool. Objectives were to examine the association between: (1) maternal childhood histories of risk and children’s emotion regulation strategies; (2) maternal childhood histories of risk and mothers’ emotion regulation strategies; (3) children’s emotion regulation and dimensions of parenting (Parenting Dimensions Inventory, PDI; Slater & Power, 1987).
Participants were drawn from the Concordia Longitudinal Risk Project, a longitudinal, intergenerational study of disadvantaged children screened along dimensions of aggression and social withdrawal, and followed into parenthood. The current sample of 81 mothers and their 9-to-12-year-old children (mean age = 10.88) engaged in cooperative (game-playing) and conflict (discussion of topic rated as conflictual by the dyad) tasks. Emotion regulation behaviours (e.g. self-soothing, avoiding eye contact, turning away) for mother and child were observationally coded using the Middle Childhood Emotion Regulation Scheme. Mothers completed the PDI (parental support, structure, punishment).
Children of mothers with childhood histories of aggression were significantly more likely to use “self-comfort” behaviours (e.g. self-soothing) during the conflict task, suggesting that elements of mothers’ aggressive style were maintained over time and contributed to their parenting. Consequently, children may have used more self-comfort behaviours to regulate their emotions during conflictual interactions.
Mothers with histories of aggression used more “approach verbal negative” strategies (e.g. raising their voice, using harsh tones, being sarcastic) with their children during the cooperative task. In addition, both maternal histories of aggression and mothers using less “approach verbal positive”, predicted children using less “approach verbal positive” (e.g. positive emotional expression) in the cooperative task. Results suggest that maternal childhood histories of aggression may be related to later parenting behaviour and the use of less adaptive interaction strategies in offspring.
Mothers who reported high parental support on the PDI had children who used less self-comfort behaviours in both tasks. Further, mothers who reported more parental punishment had children who used more self-comfort behaviours. Children who receive sufficient parental support may not need the additional regulation offered by self-comfort, while those who feel threatened about punishment may be more inclined to employ this regulation strategy.
Together, findings contribute to our limited understanding of how maternal childhood behaviours are related to emotion regulation strategies in their offspring. In addition, mothers’ childhood behaviours may be related to their emotion regulation strategies as adults, which may serve as a mechanism for the transfer of risk in interactions with their children. The relationship between parental support and punishment and children’s emotion regulation serves to further highlight the link between parent factors and child behaviour. Findings have implications for the development of parenting and behaviour training programs that include emotion regulation strategies.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Meier, Molisa. and Bureau, Jean-Francois. "Association Between Childhood Family Risk and Current Accounts of Childhood Disorganization and Role-reversal" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2020-02-22 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p955773_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Prior research has found disorganized and role-reversed attachment, manifested as caregiving or punitive behaviors, related to poor psychological outcomes (O’Connor et al., 2011). These attachment patterns are also associated to childhood risk markers, such as low-family income, parental mental health issues and parental divorce (Moss et al., 2011). Research on retrospective accounts of parentification, similar to caregiving attachment, is growing interest on how an individual’s cultural context may impact the frequency of caregiving behaviors and moderate associations between caregiving and psychological well-being as expectations to care for family members may differ among cultural backgrounds (Hooper et al., 2012). No study to date has explored the relative contributions of childhood risk and cultural identification on reports of childhood disorganization and role-reversal in older adolescents. Given the absence of a self-report measure of disorganization and role-reversal in older adolescents, the Childhood Disorganization and Role Reversal Scale (CDRR: Meier & Bureau, 2012) was developed to fill this void. Mother CDRR subscales includes: Disorganization/Punitive, Affective Caregiving, Mutual Hostility and Appropriate Boundaries. Father CDRR subscales includes: Disorganization, Punitive, Affective Caregiving and Appropriate Boundaries. This study aims to identify clusters on childhood risk and cultural identification through latent class analysis (LCA), and to examine the interplay of these variables on accounts of childhood disorganization, role-reversal and appropriate parental boundaries.
The sample included 728 undergraduate students (587 females, Mage=18.68 years; SD=1.34). Participants completed the CDRR and questions on cultural background and adverse life events that were recombined as dichotomous indicator variables: Intact family/non-intact family, Presence/absence of family financial issues, Presence/absence of parental mental/physical illness, Presence/absence of parental risky behavior/chaotic environment, White/non-White, Immigrant/non-immigrant and Identification to dominant/non-dominant culture.
A LCA was performed to determine clusters of participants based on their responses to indicator variables. A 4-cluster model solution was found to best fit the data after testing models with 1 to 6 clusters. Cluster labels were determined by examining each cluster’s conditional item probabilities (Figure 1): Dominant Culture/Low Childhood Risk, Dominant Culture/High Childhood Risk, Non-dominant Culture/Low Childhood Risk and Non-dominant Culture/High Childhood Risk.
A series of ANOVAs were conducted to determine differences among clusters on CDRR subscales. For both parent scales, clusters showed main effects (Table 1). It was generally found that, among the other clusters, the Dominant Culture/Low Childhood Risk cluster reported the least amount of disorganization and affective caregiving and reported more appropriate boundaries with both parents. Also, the Non-dominant Culture/High Childhood Risk cluster reported more parental disorganization and mutual hostility than the Non-dominant Culture/Low Childhood Risk cluster, demonstrating that regardless of cultural identification, lower levels of childhood risk may act as a protective buffer.
These results suggest that although cultural background plays a role in attachment quality, childhood risk appears to have a greater impact on attachment given the absence of significant differences in scores for the Dominant Culture/High Childhood Risk cluster and Non-dominant Culture/High Childhood Risk cluster. Clinically, this study points to the importance of assessing attachment behaviors within an individual’s cultural context and to evaluate risk factors.

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