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2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 250 words || 
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1. Thangaraj, Miriam. "Children’s rights and children’s lives: How working children make sense of schooling" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493834_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores how the two central paradigms shaping international development and education policies – the Education For All (EFA) and the Child Rights (CR) frameworks – inform and articulate with each other, as they are used by states to target children in difficult circumstances. While EFA discourses present formal schooling as the central means of protecting children’s best interests, CR-based approaches insist on the participation of children in determining their best interests. Using qualitative data from a rural ‘block’ in southern India, it investigates the tensions and overlaps between the two frameworks in the situated context of child workers’ lives.
EFA-based enforced schooling policies imagine child workers as passive victims of parental decision-making; CR-frameworks, on the other hand, use an ‘agentic’ approach to claim that child workers make informed decisions about their lives. What does it mean for children (held to be ‘marginalized’ by circumstances that require them to work) to be seen as social actors who, despite their tenuous situations, are capable of participating in decisions about schooling and work?
By drawing on qualitative interviews and observations of working children, I attempt to understand how child workers participate in and theorize about the decision to stay in school or drop out to work. If education seeks “to liberate,” I suggest that policy conceptions of children’s right to education must move beyond a polarized framing of work versus school; it must recognize how children’s developmental trajectories are situated within immediate social institutions of family, work, gender, class or caste.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9254 words || 
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2. Yang, Juhua. and Duan, Chengrong. "School Enrollment of Stay Children, Migrant Children and Other Children with A Rural Registration: An Analysis of China’s 2000 Census" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242188_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Large –scale labor migration in the past two decades in China has reshaped family structure of migrants, generating numerous stay children (i.e., children who are left behind) and migrant children. Stay children and some migrant children live in nontraditional households without parental immediate care and guidance in daily life and schooling. This would have implications for their education. Drawing on the 2000 Census data, this paper explores the patterns, characteristics and determinants of school enrollment of stay, migrant, and other children (whose parents do not migrate) ages 11-14 with a rural hukou (registration). Analytical results suggest that, first, stay children have a higher likelihood of school enrollment than migrant children and other children, but such effect varies by whom the children stay with: those staying with the mother have the best education opportunity. Second, migrant children have a lower chance of enrollment, particularly so for those who migrate alone or with parents. Such findings provide little support for the current public and academic opinions within China on the education wellbeing of stay children. Since education plays an important for individual socio-economic mobility in the Chinese society, the disadvantages faced by migrant children are likely to have detrimental and long-term consequences for them in particularly and for the society in general.

2009 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 9 pages || Words: 4615 words || 
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3. Manouchehri, Azita. "From“THESE” children to “MY” children: Shifts in discourse about the needs of children from poor communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, OMNI Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Sep 23, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369815_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Report
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this work we examined the impact of a 10 weeks long experience of one-on-one work with children from disadvantaged communities at a learning center on a cohort of thirty middle school mathematics teacher candidates’ views about children’s learning and teaching matters. Data collected through reflective journals indicated that personal and sustained experience of working with children allowed the teacher candidates to shift their focus from identifying what they perceived to be children’s academic and social “deficiencies” to importance of making mathematics meaningful to children. The teachers however, continued to overestimate their ability to influence children’s academic and social growth.

2017 - UCEA Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Reyes, Augustina. "Whose Children Are These Children? To Whom Do the School-to-Prison Pipeline Children Belong?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the UCEA Annual Convention, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver, Colorado, Nov 16, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1290437_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to follow school discipline data to show that the way children are treated in school helps to set them on a path for later life. Students who were suspended in school were more likely to be arrested than students who were never suspended (Western, 2013). This study will follow the school-to-prison pipeline from state policy to district policy to school leadership practices and to the detention center.

2015 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 6256 words || 
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5. Lee, YeonJin. "From Children to Parents? Children’s Educational Attainment and Parents Mortality" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Chicago and Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, Illinois, Aug 20, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-11-21 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1010049_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: As research investigating the relationship between socioeconomic status (SES) and health and mortality proliferates, the need for studies of the extensive links between family level socioeconomic resources—beyond one’s own SES—and health has increased. However, very few studies focused on whether adult offspring’s SES matters for their parents’ health and mortality independent of parents’ own SES. In this study I contribute to literature by examining whether parents’ mortality is affected by adult children’s educational attainment using Korean data from 2006 to 2012. This study also extends the previous research by empirically testing mechanisms through which adult children’s schooling contributes to their parental longevity by including comprehensive mediators: frequency of contacts and financial support provided by offspring. I find a significant relationship between children’s education and parent’s longevity even after controlling for parent's socioeconomic characteristics. The statistical power of the relationship is removed, however, when frequency of contacts and financial support for parents are simultaneously controlled for. The result suggests that adult children's education can promote parental health via better social supports and investment in the younger generation's education can be a strategy to address healthy aging.

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