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2009 - North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education Pages: 9 pages || Words: 4615 words || 
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1. Manouchehri, Azita. "From“THESE” children to “MY” children: Shifts in discourse about the needs of children from poor communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, OMNI Hotel, Atlanta, GA, Sep 23, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p369815_index.html>
Publication Type: Research Report
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In this work we examined the impact of a 10 weeks long experience of one-on-one work with children from disadvantaged communities at a learning center on a cohort of thirty middle school mathematics teacher candidates’ views about children’s learning and teaching matters. Data collected through reflective journals indicated that personal and sustained experience of working with children allowed the teacher candidates to shift their focus from identifying what they perceived to be children’s academic and social “deficiencies” to importance of making mathematics meaningful to children. The teachers however, continued to overestimate their ability to influence children’s academic and social growth.

2011 - 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 250 words || 
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2. Thangaraj, Miriam. "Children’s rights and children’s lives: How working children make sense of schooling" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 55th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Fairmont Le Reine Elizabeth, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2017-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p493834_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores how the two central paradigms shaping international development and education policies – the Education For All (EFA) and the Child Rights (CR) frameworks – inform and articulate with each other, as they are used by states to target children in difficult circumstances. While EFA discourses present formal schooling as the central means of protecting children’s best interests, CR-based approaches insist on the participation of children in determining their best interests. Using qualitative data from a rural ‘block’ in southern India, it investigates the tensions and overlaps between the two frameworks in the situated context of child workers’ lives.
EFA-based enforced schooling policies imagine child workers as passive victims of parental decision-making; CR-frameworks, on the other hand, use an ‘agentic’ approach to claim that child workers make informed decisions about their lives. What does it mean for children (held to be ‘marginalized’ by circumstances that require them to work) to be seen as social actors who, despite their tenuous situations, are capable of participating in decisions about schooling and work?
By drawing on qualitative interviews and observations of working children, I attempt to understand how child workers participate in and theorize about the decision to stay in school or drop out to work. If education seeks “to liberate,” I suggest that policy conceptions of children’s right to education must move beyond a polarized framing of work versus school; it must recognize how children’s developmental trajectories are situated within immediate social institutions of family, work, gender, class or caste.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 23 pages || Words: 9254 words || 
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3. Yang, Juhua. and Duan, Chengrong. "School Enrollment of Stay Children, Migrant Children and Other Children with A Rural Registration: An Analysis of China’s 2000 Census" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p242188_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Large –scale labor migration in the past two decades in China has reshaped family structure of migrants, generating numerous stay children (i.e., children who are left behind) and migrant children. Stay children and some migrant children live in nontraditional households without parental immediate care and guidance in daily life and schooling. This would have implications for their education. Drawing on the 2000 Census data, this paper explores the patterns, characteristics and determinants of school enrollment of stay, migrant, and other children (whose parents do not migrate) ages 11-14 with a rural hukou (registration). Analytical results suggest that, first, stay children have a higher likelihood of school enrollment than migrant children and other children, but such effect varies by whom the children stay with: those staying with the mother have the best education opportunity. Second, migrant children have a lower chance of enrollment, particularly so for those who migrate alone or with parents. Such findings provide little support for the current public and academic opinions within China on the education wellbeing of stay children. Since education plays an important for individual socio-economic mobility in the Chinese society, the disadvantages faced by migrant children are likely to have detrimental and long-term consequences for them in particularly and for the society in general.

2009 - 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Pages: 12 pages || Words: 3245 words || 
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4. Jahng, Kyung Eun. "Troubling identities of Korean-American children in their schooling: Historical and contextual analyses of the construction of Korean-American children" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 53rd Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Francis Marion Hotel, Charleston, South Carolina, Mar 22, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p297868_index.html>
Publication Type: Dissertation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The goal of my study is to take a 'different' approach to the discussion about Korean American children's 'identities' to complicate our common dialogue about them. Specifically I will take a look at how historically shifting and contextually varying discourses sanction different conceptions about Korean American children and how the discourses are institutionalized and played out through teacher's pedagogical practices as the embodiment of dominant discourses. I also view their identity negotiation as a technology of the self. For this, I will use both Foucauldian historical (genealogy) and quasi-ethnographic (critical discourse analysis) analyses to answer two different questions about historically shifting and contextually varying discourses that constitute Korean American children. The concepts of discourse, power/knowledge, subjectivity, the technology of the self and inclusion/exclusion doublet, which will be the key concepts that I will implement for the analyses of the topic through this study, will be explored in relation to Korean American children and their education. The research questions of the study are as follows: (1) how have Korean American children been historically, socially and contextually constituted?; (2) how do teachers’ ideas and pedagogical practices as embodiment of institutionalized dominant discourses about a good Korean American child lead to the construction of their identity?; and (3) how are Korean American children’s negotiations of their ‘multiple’ identities, as a technology of the self, acted in different contexts in their early schooling? For this, I will reveal how Korean American children are constructed by the totalizing (all encompassing) efforts of teachers’ discourses about normalcy, Koreanness/Asianness, the notion of a child, model minority stereotype, and children of color. Reframing the topic of identity and culture, especially with regard to so-called ‘minority’ children, within a different epistemological/theoretical territory is a reformatory act in that previous studies about this topic view power as something that can be possessed and therefore children are considered to be disempowered, passive recipients rather than actors exercising power. Since my study brings up different discourses making up Korean American children, I do not explain their identity construction under the limit of cultural effect. In my study, ‘Korean’ refers to not only culture but also discourses defining and commonly associated with Korean American children.

2010 - 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Pages: unavailable || Words: 2083 words || 
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5. Prasad, Gail. "Alter(n)ative research with children: Methodological considerations when engaging culturally and linguistically diverse children as co-researchers" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 54th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, Feb 28, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2017-12-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401054_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: By drawing on data from one case study in Burkina Faso and two case studies in Ontario, Canada, I raise methodological concerns related to the shift from conducting research about children to engaging with children as co-researchers. The challenges of accessing CLD children’s perspectives in particular, are magnified when adult researchers and child researchers do not have a shared linguistic background. I offer the construct of ‘alter(n)ative research’ as a way of re-envisioning children as researchers. The term alter(n)ative is developed to suggest the intertwined benefit of expanding traditional notions of scientific research to include alternative research practices informed by the arts and the potential alter-ative effect released by affirming the creative resources children offer early childhood research in increasingly diverse contexts.

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