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2013 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 10035 words || 
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1. Simpson, Edgar. "‘An Offense to Conventional Wisdom:’ Press independence and Publisher W.E. Chilton III, 1960 to 1987" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Renaissance Hotel, Washington DC, Aug 08, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p669560_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over more than two decades as owner/publisher of West Virginia’s largest daily newspaper, The Charleston Gazette, W.E. “Ned” Chilton III established a legacy of independence that serves as an apt framework to discuss today’s core issues surrounding the meaning of a free press. Through the prism of a public sphere invigorated by an independent press, this case study examines Chilton’s insistence on journalism as a seeker of truth – or at least his version of truth - and a hammer for change rather than a “neutral” purveyor of information. This paper, which uses Chilton’s archives, interviews, existing literature, and more than 200 articles of the time period, focuses on three episodes: His battle for the Gazette’s file compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which revealed to the nation for the first time that the FBI had investigated news organizations in addition to individual journalists; the run-up to the Vietnam War, in which the Gazette was cited as one of the first in the nation to challenge the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution as a rationale for military action, and his long association with West Virginia U.S. Senator John Rockefeller, which eventually forced him to choose between friendship and independence. Overall, this study found and the author argues two essential elements for the concept of press independence: the ability to make decisions and a loyalty to ideals that reach beyond business or personal concerns.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 10890 words || 
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2. Simpson, Edgar. ""A Traitor to His Class": Race and Publisher W.E. ‘Ned’ Chilton III, 1953-1984" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p982591_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study looks historically at the role of the press in the public sphere, using as a case study the evolution of the views of publisher W.E. “Ned” Chilton III on race issues during his career at The Charleston Gazette, West Virginia’s largest newspaper. Chilton, born into privilege, was as an unquestioning member of the white power structure. However, over time he became extremely vocal on Civil Rights issues, often using The Gazette’s editorial pages and reporting resources to do so. In examining Chilton’s publishing career, this study reveals how a single newspaper publisher became the most vocal and possibly the most effective voice for change in West Virginia during the civil rights movement, illustrating the dynamic role of even a single press outlet in providing access to information for debate in the public sphere.

2009 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: 31 pages || Words: 9577 words || 
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3. Simpson, Edgar. "Pressing the Press: William E. Chilton III's investigation of fellow newspaper owners between 1980 and 1986" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Sheraton Boston, Boston, MA, Aug 05, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p374696_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: William E. Chilton III was the third generation of his family to serve as publisher/owner of the Charleston Gazette, West Virginia’s largest newspaper. Despite his wealth, Chilton chose to spend his career honing his philosophy of “sustained outrage.” His efforts included two separate investigations into his fellow newspaper owners, which revealed corrupt legal advertising practices, failure to challenge local politicians and businessmen and a widespread focus on profits rather than principles.

2012 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 10747 words || 
Info
4. Simpson, Edgar. ""Towering Legal Reforms": W.E. "Ned" Chilton III and Legal Battles for the Public Sphere, 1971-1986" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, May 24, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p550246_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the course of 25 years as owner/publisher of West Virginia’s largest newspaper, The Charleston Gazette, W.E. “Ned” Chilton III developed a journalism philosophy that he called “sustained outrage.” Newspapers too often failed, he argued to the Southern Newspaper Publishers Association in 1983, to examine “basic injustices and fundamental idiocies” and to use their resources to uphold First Amendment values. Between 1971 and 1986, Chilton launched and defended dozens of law suits, establishing a variety of precedents at the local, state, and national levels. These include the landmark 1979 U.S. Supreme Court ruling allowing the publishing of juvenile names, opening state Bar Association records to public scrutiny, and establishing a policy of suing the lawyers who sued him for libel. This study explores his unusually vigorous invocation of First Amendment rights within the context of preserving the public sphere and ongoing concerns over the fate of public debate without a muscular press.

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