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2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 14602 words || 
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1. Mathias, Autumn. "Translocational Positionality and Perceived Causes of Anti-Christian Violence in India by Indian Christians in Diaspora" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1378906_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Within the last twenty years, incidents of anti-Christian violence have become more prevalent and widespread in the Indian context. This working paper, which is one component of a larger project examining the responses of Asian Indian Christians in diaspora to religious persecution, explores the perceived causes of this violence by Asian Indian Christians in North America. Many of these individuals have engaged in transnational human rights activism directed at this and related issues. Along with the analysis of participant observation and in-depth interviews of forty-seven participants, I employ a translocational lens, the social ecological model, and emotion-based theories of violence as an integrative framework to understand these perceptions. I posit that these perceptions are not only informed by various aspects of individuals' translocational positionality and the breadth of their awareness of these multi-scalar dynamics, but also preclude their responses across transnational social and spiritual fields. Accordingly, the link between participants' identities and their descriptions of the causes of violence are often evidenced by the meanings that they attribute to "persecution", and/or if these instances are even labeled as such by participants. In this sense, taken together, interviewees created an etymology of religious persecution and an understanding of the translocational trauma process, which adds to the overall epistemology of the subject in lieu of the transnational realm.

2007 - American Sociological Association Pages: 22 pages || Words: 4996 words || 
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2. Coe, Deborah. "Do American Evangelical Christians Differ from Mainline Christians in Forms of Political Participation?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, TBA, New York, New York City, Aug 11, 2007 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p183111_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This project examined potential relationships between religious orientation and forms of political participation. The hypotheses were rooted in the cultural defense theory, a social-psychological perspective which argues that identification with a particular religious perspective can lead to behaviors that defend its culture when there is a perception that it is under attack (McVeigh and Sikkink 2001). Evangelical Protestants were hypothesized to engage in more public forms of politics to accomplish these goals than Mainline Protestants. Those who scored higher on an index of religiosity were expected to participate in public forms of politics more so than those who scored lower because of mediating effects of religiosity.
Using data collected for the 2002 National Election Study, maximum likelihood estimation and a structural equation model created in Amos 5.0, findings suggest that the hypotheses were not supported. No significant direct relationship was found between religious orientation and form of political activity. The cultural defense theory was not supported by this study. While these findings also suggest that Evangelicals are more religious than Mainline Protestants, those who were more religious participated in private forms of politics more so than public forms. Further studies might examine why this appears to be so.

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Words: 352 words || 
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3. Hicks, Darrin. and Cummings, Kevin. "Onward Christian Soldiers: Home School Debate Leagues and the Problem of Conviction for the Evangelical Christian Counter-Public" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p257242_index.html>
Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: This essay reports initial findings of an ethnographic study of the National Christian Forensics & Communications Association (NCFCA), the largest debate league for home-schooled students. Through interviews as well as analysis of particular debate rounds we inquire into the role that religious conviction plays in the formation of moral and political reasoning and advocacy skills.

Traditionally academic debate has been justified inasmuch as it cultivates critical thinking and advocacy skills and promotes such dispositions as intellectual curiosity, tolerance, and open-mindedness. These dispositions flow from the long-standing practice of having students debate both sides of the topic.

While the expectation of debating both sides is taken for granted by most high-school debaters, this is not the case with the NCFCA. The association’s stated mission is that debate is “a means for home schooled students to learn and exercise analytical and oratorical skills, addressing life issues from a Biblical world view in a manner that glorifies God.” Students are required to, through both formal sanctions and informal manipulations of the format, to use only those arguments which manifestly promote a biblical world view in relation to the topic.

Of course it is easy to see contradictions between the mission of the NCFCA and the values and dispositions traditionally justifying academic debate. But highlighting those contractions is not the purpose of this study. Our interest, on the one hand, lies in how a “technology” such as academic debate is modified to serve the purposes of the NCFCA. We believe that the answer to this question will give insight to how the norms of public debate in general are viewed by those in Christian communities and how they might be altered within the argumentation of the Christian counter-public. On the other hand, we are interested in discovering what effects the “technology” of debate has on the formation of conviction among Christian home-schooled students. Will the tendency of debate to foster moral distanciation and reflexivity be evident in these students? How do they manage the tension between debate and their convictions and what effect does it have on the student and their community membership?

2012 - Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 122 words || 
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4. Peach, Matthew. "The Defending Champions – A Christian Movement in a “Christian Nation”" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Eighth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p558036_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Nearly 75% of the United States’ population subscribes to some stripe of Christianity, and every president from Washington to Obama has been, at least publically. To outsiders to the country or religion, Christianity seems to utterly dominate the US’s social and political landscape. Despite this, we see a broad and varied field of Christian political movements responding to what they see as dire threats to both the nation and their religion’s rightful place in society. Who do they see as their opponents, and what goals do they pursue when they seem to be on top? This paper approaches these questions by analyzing the self-presentation and activities of Concerned Women for America, a Christian political movement founded in 1978.

2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 192 words || 
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5. Marshall, Jennifer. "Christian Political Rhetoric and Non-Christian Voters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p637360_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: While much research exists on the influence of religion in politics, religious rhetoric has not been addressed. A correlation between specific voter demographics and specific Christian language has been established in regards to party affiliation; however this research does not identify rhetoric or religions other than Christian. Political rhetoric is an established tool when attempting to influence voter behavior. This article addresses the theory that Christian Political Rhetoric can influence not only Christian, but non-Christian voters as well and can be applied as a tool in election predictions. This theory is tested using a combination of qualitative and quantitative research methods. A distinction between non-Christian and unaffiliated voter blocks is established and measured through self-identification measured on both ideology and consistency of church attendance. Utilizing existing research on heuristic processing, multiple instances of Christian influenced rhetoric is expressed and exposed to the respondent in the form of a speech. The change in perceived ideology, party and religious affiliation, persuasiveness, and actual voting behavior is recorded using pre and post surveys. The change, if any exists, can be used to predict voter affiliation, voter turnout, election outcomes, and political speech and campaign influences.

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