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2016 - The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 143 words || 
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1. Liou, Chih-ling. "Is a church more than a church? An exploration of Chinese elders’ social support and their church participation in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Twelfth International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 18, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1113150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Chinese elders living in the United States are faced with increasing challenges to meet their needs for social support. This study utilizes an ecological framework to analyze social support among older Chinese immigrants within a Christian Chinese church community. Seven months of participant observation and ten face-to-face, in-depth interviews were conducted at one Chinese church in the Southern U.S. Findings disclosed that gender, living arrangements, working experiences, ability to drive, and English language skills affect the support the elders sought, received, and provided. Results show that the Chinese church can be a viable source of supplementary support for Chinese elders. Some elders, however, felt the support from the church is insufficient, particularly in terms of emotional support. This study suggests an opportunity for Chinese churches to be more proactive in better understanding and providing services that meet these elders’ different needs and desires.

2016 - American Political Science Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Levy, Meyer. "Racialized Churches: How Race Changes the Impact of Church Congregations" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Philadelphia, PA, Sep 01, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1126145_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The impact of membership in church congregations upon political attitudes has been well-studied, yielding interesting results which suggest the particular significance of these associations. However, the impact of the composition of these congregations is largely neglected – we do not know how the demographic characteristics of churches impact their associational effects. This paper intends to remedy that absence by analyzing the data from the Collaborative Multi-Racial Post-Election Survey, which asks respondents both about their political attitudes and the racial composition of their church. Further, it asks respondents, independently of denomination, to characterize their congregations as evangelical or charismatic, allowing for a more nuanced investigation of the impact of congregational characteristics. The survey, conducted in late 2008, interviewed 4,563 respondents and contains oversamples of racial minorities. This paper will employ ordered logit models to analyze the determinants of attitudes on hot-button issues such as abortion, immigration, and health care reform. Preliminary analyses suggest that congregational composition possesses a strong, significant, and independent effect upon political attitudes.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 18 pages || Words: 6040 words || 
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3. Martin, Jason. "Sacred Networking or Fragmentation: The Effect of Church Attendance and Church Activity on Civic Engagement" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-24 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p104533_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This article looks at the effect of religious involvement on civic engagement. Most of the literature on this issue generally agrees that there tends to be a positive correlation between these two, however, some recent articles have found a negative association between religious service attendance and civic engagement. This article seeks to better understand the reason for this finding. By dividing the sample into three groups, The Religiously Networked, The Religiously Uninvolved and The Disengaged Attenders, this analysis sheds light on the nature of religious involvement and, subsequently, the reason for the negative association between attendance and civic engagement. The findings essentially suggest that the Disengaged Attenders, a group who attend religious services frequently while avoiding active involvement in religious groups are the cause of the negative sign. This group, while not very large (8.2% of the population), is the least involved in civic engagement, and thus creates a problem for studies using attendance to measure religious involvement as an independent variable with civic engagement as the outcome variable.
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