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2016 - 87th SPSA Annual Conference Words: 241 words || 
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1. Destler, Katharine. and Khwaja, Elsa. "When do Citizens Step in? Class, Race, and Choice as Predictors of Citizen Coproduction" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 87th SPSA Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, Jan 06, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1080378_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars (e.g. Bovaird 2007) cite the importance of citizen involvement, and more beyond that, coproduction, to public service quality and democratic bonds. We need to know more about the factors that contribute to and impede it.

Research and theory are mixed (Bifulco and Ladd 2006: Kerbow and Bernhardt 1993). Putnam argues that diversity erodes social trust and civic engagement (2007); Uslander finds that segregation, rather than diversity, is the chief culprit (2012). Moreover, few studies have analyzed individual decision in the context of quasi-markets that promote client choice. Choice could strengthen ties to specific organizations and thus increase involvement; however, it could also facilitate exit, diminishing the need for voice (Hirschman 1970; Bifulco and Ladd 2006)
We analyze a national survey of U.S. parent involvement in education to examine how individual and organizational demographics predict coproduction, asking

1. Are parents more likely to participate in economically and racially homogenous schools?
2. Are parents more likely to participate in schools that are a close racial or economic “match”?
3. To what extent does choice moderate the relationship between race, class and parent involvement?

Findings suggest that parents are more likely to participate in schools racially and economically homogenous and/or a good racial match. Effects are weaker when one accounts for school choice. The inclusion of school choice main and interaction effects substantially reduces the effect size of racial and economic homogeneity and parent-school matches.

These findings have broad implications for educational equity, public management and civic engagement.

2016 - American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting Words: 200 words || 
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2. Todd, Hilary. "Citizen Monitoring Re-Visited: The Impact of Citizen Monitoring on Police Use of Justified Force" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 72nd Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Nov 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1149568_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Citizen monitoring of police officers is an area of increasing importance in law enforcement research. Law enforcement officials have been profoundly impacted by the practice of citizens recording their actions (Todd, 2015). Footage recorded of officers conducting their work either properly or improperly and the subsequent uploading of the same footage onto the Internet has had marked effects on members of the force (Todd, 2015). Interviews conducted in 2014 indicate that citizen monitoring contributed to officers using less justified force than is both required and is necessary in a given situation, to the “hesitation factor”, which purports that officers hesitate when they should act, and to officers embodying the FIDO effect.
This study offers a re-examination of the phenomenon of citizen monitoring and its impact on police use of justified force two years after the initial interviews were conducted. Given the ever-changing landscape of policing and the rapidly increasing presence of technology within society, further exploration of the phenomenon of citizen monitoring was necessary. In particular, this study addresses whether officers are less likely to use necessary and legitimate force when faced with the possibility of being subject to citizen monitoring, and considers differences between the 2014 and 2016 findings.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 17062 words || 
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3. Huang, Kanni. "Citizen Journalism as a Supplement to Reporting on Environmental Issues: Examining the Viewpoint Diversity of Arctic Oil Drilling in Citizen-Involved News" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282867_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Citizen journalism plays the role of supplementing legacy news outlets by providing alternative angles possibly absent from those outlets. Arguments about environmental issues in mainstream news outlets usually focus on limited viewpoints, and citizen journalism has the potential to increase the visibility of minor viewpoints about environmental issues. Using the hierarchical model of influence on news content (Shoemaker & Reese, 1991), this study examines different levels of citizen-involved activities to predict the presence of minority viewpoints in the news.
Arctic oil drilling was selected as a case study because of its wide range of geographic impact (local, national, and global) and the potentially diverse viewpoints that can be advocated. A sample was collected from the Google News database and environmental citizen sites. A content analysis was conducted using news stories and opinion pieces appearing between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2015. Results show that citizen authorship or stories published on sites accepting user-submitted stories do not add new or alternative viewpoints to the issue discussion. Instead, citizen journalists tend to defend their positions by giving more popular rationales—for example, ecological sustainability. Citizens’ work published in news media helps strengthen the popular viewpoints instead of supplementing alternative views into public discussion.

2018 - ACJS 55th Annual Meeting Words: 96 words || 
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4. Bishopp, Steve., Gaub, Janne., Todak, Natalie. and White, Michael. "A Deeper Look at the Impact of BWCs on Use of Force and Citizen Complaints: Do Citizen Demographics Matter?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ACJS 55th Annual Meeting, Hilton New Orleans Riverside, New Orleans, LA, Feb 13, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1346870_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Body-worn cameras (BWCs) are a tool with the potential to improve increasingly tense police-community relations, especially among minority communities, as many studies found drastic declines in use of force and complaints post-deployment. However, questions remain about their impact on the dynamics of encounters. The authors examine citizen complaints and officer use of force among (1) a sample of Dallas police officers with BWCs, and (2) a sample of matched non-BWC officers. The analysis moves beyond the use of aggregated rates to assess the role that citizen demographics play in the relationship between BWCs and police actions.

2018 - MPSA Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Weigel, Jonathan. "Building State and Citizen: How Tax Collection in Congo Engenders Citizen Engagement with the State" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the MPSA Annual Conference, Palmer House Hilton, Chicago, IL, Apr 05, 2018 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1350916_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: I examine whether tax collection - randomly assigned to neighborhoods of a Congolese city - triggers political participation. The evidence supports this hypothesis. I present a new, signaling mechanism linking taxation and participation.

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