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2004 - Western Political Science Association Pages: 58 pages || Words: 17926 words || 
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1. Carriveau, Pamela. "Educating for Citizenship: Policies Prescribing Citizenship Behavior and Their Effects on Student Citizenship Beliefs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, Marriott Hotel, Portland, Oregon, Mar 11, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p88181_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This is one section of a larger study investigating the relationship between schools and student ideas about citizenship. Earlier chapters outline the educational theories behind citizenship education, the federal, state, and local policies prescribing citizenship education, and the specific programs individual schools produce to address citizenship education. The purpose of this chapter is to present the students’ attitudes on citizenship as articulated in their survey responses and attempt to identify sources of these attitudes through statistical analysis. Kids do think about citizenship, however, not exclusively in ways usually focused on in the political science socialization research. In the end, this paper investigates the connection between the messages schools send and the opinions students expressed in their responses to various survey questions regarding citizenship.

2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 25 pages || Words: 10675 words || 
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2. Ni Mhurchu, Aoileann. "Citizenship as absolute space/ citizenship as contingent trace: Exploring how the ‘politics’ of citizenship is theorized" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p412982_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In considering the growing inter-disciplinary concern with the challenge which migration poses to traditional notions of solidarity and belonging embedded in the concept of ‘citizen’, this paper sets out to explore the possibility that there is a divergence within critical citizenship scholarship with regard to the question itself of how a new ‘politics’ of citizenship should be theorized in this context. Using the distinction which Richard Ashley and Rob Walker drew in 1990 between two possible critical responses to crisis and the question of sovereignty, it argues that two strands of thought can be identified which each produce a different understanding of what it means to become a citizen here. In the first strand ‘citizen’ continues to be articulated in terms of sovereign autonomous subjectivity and thus in terms of horizontal or territorial relations between here and there, us and them, inside and outside. In the second strand ‘citizen’ is (re)articulated in terms of ambiguous paradoxical subjectivity which instead challenges the modern framing of the politics of citizenship as necessarily needing to be conceptualized in terms of absolute space. This divergence is explored through the lens of the 2004 Irish Citizenship Referendum.

2013 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 11969 words || 
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3. Byrne, Bridget. "Ceremonialising Citizenship: What Citizenship Ceremonies Can Tell Us about Evolving Regimes of Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton New York and Sheraton New York, New York, NY, Aug 09, 2013 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p650662_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper will explore the explore rituals of creating citizens as seen in the proliferating citizenship ceremonies across the world. This exploration will be situated in a context of the reassertion of western states of their ability to assert control over the movement across both external borders and internal borders (for instance at the point of access to services).The paper will argue that whilst the rationale for the ceremonies is to provide a more formal welcome to new citizens, they are also the moments of production of a particular rhetoric of citizenship. This rhetoric is not only based on the exclusion of others who are constructed as both unworthy of threatening to citizenship, but also through the very notion of welcome, can maintain the distinction orientalist between the ‘new’ and ‘old’ citizens.

2005 - The Law and Society Words: 249 words || 
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4. Gomez, Laura. "Second Class Citizenship on the Frontier: Race, Place, and the Limits of Federal Citizenship in the Nineteenth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society, J.W. Marriott Resort, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p18082_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Since September 2001, the Bush administration has developed a series of mechanisms, by-passing due process protections, to indefinitely detain Middle Eastern men on a civil immigration pretext. This paper will argue that the nation's immigration laws have been misappropriated to craft a system of preventive detention giving rise to imprisonment without charge for weeks and months, denial of access to lawyers or family visitation, interrogations and threats during the period of detention, physical and psychological abuse and ultimately deportations without a fair initial hearing or the exhaustion of available appellate recourse.

This new system of civil detention is specifically designed to weaken constitutional due process protections. U.S. officials may have borrowed a page from illiberal regimes that are "war on terror" allies in developing their administrative detention strategies, a contention that this paper will also consider. Civil detention has also been correlated to the practice of "renditions," whereby individuals detained in the U.S. are deported to countries more willing to engage in traditional torture practices in
continued interrogation post-deportation. The combination of detention practices within the U.S. and the "rendition" of detainees to countries known to engage in torture, makes explicit the link, under the Bush administration, between the violations of procedural rights in the U.S. and the violations of the laws of war outside of the U.S. This paper will contribute to an understanding of how the war on immigrants -- and attendant domestic detention practices -- is an integral part of America's
war on terror strategy.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 22 pages || Words: 4731 words || 
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5. Carreira da Silva, Filipe. "Performative Citizenship Towards a Trans-scalar Conception of Citizenship" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307188_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Global cities are increasingly depicted, in urban literature, as spaces with a critical economic and a critical political function. The argument is simple, if not simplistic. Global cities are the political arenas of the future; the territorial nation-state the form of political organization of a bygone era, an era where sovereignty, territory, nationality and citizenship coincided neatly. This literature suffers from a recurrent limitation. Although it is written against the scalar mode of thinking which underpins Western modernity, the rescaling alternative it proposes, on the whole, expands rather than moves beyond it.
Our proposed alternative is to conceive of the city as a context of action in which the citizen, the rights she enjoys, the socio-economic background conditions and institutions that guarantee them, the consumer and political culture that transforms them, all contribute to define one another. It is an empirical question to determine the relative weight of each contribution. But the reach of each particular “act of citizenship” can only be fully captured if one abandons a rigidly stratified logic, and sees it as the outcome of a plurality of intersecting factors, and as, at the same time, using and traversing, in their concrete embodiments, the inflexible constitution of scales.

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