Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,004 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 401 - Next  Jump:
2013 - International Communication Association Words: 342 words || 
Info
1. Bachen, Christine., Hernandez-Ramos, Pedro. and Raphael, Chad. "Civic Games and Civic Gaps: Which Students Benefit Most From Civic Game Play?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639473_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Prior research suggests that civic games can provide benefits, but are unlikely to benefit all students equally. Research suggests that civic education often boosts civic learning and participation most dramatically among economically and educationally advantaged students, who are already more likely to engage in public life. Yet some research on game-based learning suggests that it most engages low-achieving students and those with greater experience of social game play. Is civic game-based education more likely to make the civically rich richer or to engage the least civically engaged?

In addition, as Joseph Kahne and Joel Westheimer have shown, civic educators have different goals and approaches to citizenship. These include a traditional vision of molding personally responsible citizens (who express patriotism and obey laws), a mainstream vision of inspiring participatory citizens (who vote and join voluntary organizations), and a critical vision of preparing justice-oriented citizens (who try to transform the root causes of injustice in social, political, and economic realms). Can civic games increase interest in practicing each of these kinds of citizenship?

We address these two research questions through a multi-site quasi-experimental study in Northern California high schools, which examines the impact of a game-based curriculum on students’ interest in civic learning and action. As part of their global history and social studies classes, students played a life simulator game, REAL LIVES. The game allows players to experience conditions in countries around the world by discovering how an individual character’s life is shaped by social, economic, and political constraints and opportunities, as well as by the players’ own life choices. Game play was integrated into class discussion and assignments.

We find that the curriculum most benefitted students who were low-achieving and least civically engaged. Low-achieving students made the greatest gains in political interest. The least civically engaged students most increased their interest in practicing personally responsible and participatory forms of citizenship. We conclude with suggestions for how designers and educators can replicate these findings that games can stimulate learning and engagement among students who are the least civically experienced and educationally successful.

2017 - 88th Annual SPSA Conference Words: 205 words || 
Info
2. Maloyed, Christie. "Civic Habits: Developing a Practice of Civic Education in America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 88th Annual SPSA Conference, Hyatt Regency, New Orleans, LA, Jan 11, 2017 <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1211807_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In 21st century American public schools, civics is usually approached as a matter of teaching students to master certain facts and values. Under this model, good citizenship is most often understood as familiarity with important historical dates, political leaders, and ideas. To prove this level of knowledge, in some states, students now must pass a citizenship test in order to graduate from high school. But this knowledge does not ensure that citizens are equipped with the skills necessary to participate in a democratic government. These skills require deliberate cultivation and practice. While the importance of habit formation is recognized in the fields of business and personal development, less attention has been paid in the area of contemporary civic education. The history of political thought has a rich tradition of theorizing about the types of virtues necessary to function effectively as a citizen. Drawing from the work of Aristotle, Benjamin Franklin, and John Dewey, among others, this paper outlines a conception of civic habits necessary to equip students with the skills necessary to be an effective citizen. By bridging the fields of the history of political thought, civic education, and habit development, this work offers a practical application of political theory in the area of education.

2017 - Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting Words: 497 words || 
Info
3. Janmaat, Jan Germen. "Exploring the Association of Diversity with Civic Outcomes using IEA Civic Education Data" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Comparative and International Education Society CIES Annual Meeting, Sheraton Atlanta Downtown, Atlanta, Georgia, <Not Available>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1215985_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: The IEA Civic Education studies are the only data sources available to conduct cross-national research on a wide range of socio-political attitudes among adolescents. The international character of these studies, the information collected about the participating schools and the sample structure of one classroom per school allow researchers to investigate educational conditions at both the macro and micro level and see how they relate to socio-political outcomes. I have made extensive use of these data in my research on the link between education in all its facets and civic values. In this presentation I review my articles on education, diversity and social cohesion to highlight theoretical perspectives, methodological approaches, key findings and strengths and weaknesses. I conclude with suggestions for future civic education studies.

These articles explored the following questions: (1) Are immigrant youth of non-western backgrounds less supportive of civic values than native youth? (2) Are ethnically diverse educational surroundings associated with students being more tolerant and politically engaged? How are educational tracking and social and ethnic segregation related to levels and disparities in civic values? I drew upon various theoretical perspectives from political science, psychology and sociology to explore these questions and develop hypotheses. These include Huntington’s clash of civilizations, Allport’s contact theory, Blumer and Blalock’s conflict theory and the notion that tracking enhances segregation and inequality of educational outcomes. In practically all these papers I employed multilevel analysis to explore the impact of educational conditions at the country, classroom and individual level on civic outcomes. This type of analysis is now commonplace in social science research. It enables the inclusion of (cross-level) interaction effects which are helpful in assessing questions such as (1) do countries with early selection systems have larger social and ethnic disparities in civic values than countries with comprehensive systems, and (2) does the effect of ethnic diversity on student attitudes of tolerance depend on the nature of this diversity?

Some of the articles’ findings have clear policy relevance. The finding that social and ethnic inequalities in ethnic tolerance, patriotism and civic competences are indeed greater in countries with early selection systems, for instance, suggests that it may be wiser to postpone tracking if the objective is to diminish disparities in key democratic values. Similarly, the finding that classroom ethnic diversity generally promotes inclusive attitudes towards immigrants in countries with established immigrant communities suggests that an integrated schooling system (as opposed to a segregated one) needs to be put in place if the aim is to foster tolerance but that some patience is required before this positive effect emerges in settings with many first-generation immigrant children.
In terms of suggestions for the future, I call on the large-scale international assessment organizations to explore cross-national longitudinal studies surveying cohorts of adolescents from ages 14 to 24 on a regular basis. This would enable researchers to track the development of civic values in a crucial formative stage, address selection effects and assess how lasting the effects of K12 educational conditions are on civic values.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 34 pages || Words: 9338 words || 
Info
4. Wells, Christopher., Freelon, Deen. and Bennett, W. Lance. "Civic Learning Online: A Framework for the Study of Civic Engagement Websites for Youth" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p298455_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For many observers, the internet offers exciting possibilities for reconnecting young people with civic life. Several studies have analyzed civic websites designed for youth, but the field of civic learning online has so far lacked a theoretical framework for understanding the many civic websites now emerging. This article reviews the extensive research on civic education in schools, and uncovers four general categories of civic learning applicable to a range of contexts. Next, the article draws on recent work describing the uniqueness of young people’s civic, communicative, and learning styles, and expands the four learning categories to include more participatory and expressive learning opportunities than those usually available in schools. This expanded framework is applied to 90 of North America’s most-trafficked youth civic engagement websites. Results indicate that most sites present something like classroom civics offered online, though sites without offline connections offer a more diverse set of opportunities. We discuss ways to improve approaches to engaging young people through the internet.

2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
5. Wiertz, Dingeman. and Lim, Chaeyoon. "Durable Civic Disparities across Local Areas in the United States: Civic Deserts, Hotspots, and Their Destinies" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-04-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1253250_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars have observed that local areas vary substantially in their civic vitality and more importantly such disparity in civic life can be remarkably durable. However, how such durability in civic disparity emerges, especially given that individuals constantly join and leave civic activities, is not well understood. Because durable civic disparities have been observed across different times and places, we need certain general mechanisms to explain how local civic disparities can be reproduced over time. This study develops a simple theoretical model that can explain the emergence of durable civic disparities across local areas. We test the key mechanisms and predictions of the model using the Current Population Survey data on volunteering, covering the period from 2002 to 2015. We argue that a high level of volunteering in an area has a positive feedback effect on its residents’ decisions to start or quit volunteering activities. This feedback effect, however, is counterbalanced by structural disadvantages in a high volunteering area, namely that it has fewer people that could possibly start and more people that could potentially quit volunteering activities than a low volunteering area. As a result of these two distinct forces, we predict that the differences in local volunteering rates are reproduced over time with some shorter-term fluctuations. Our analyses of the CPS panel data support the key mechanisms and the predictions of our model, pointing at powerful civic path dependence across local areas in the US.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 401 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy