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2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 9283 words || 
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1. Yang, Myung Ji. "Class Politics as a Ruling Strategy: Working Class Exclusion and Middle Class Inclusion during the Park Chung Hee Regime in South Korea?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p103870_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Many writings emphasize repressive aspects of authoritarian regimes and resistance against them from society. Paying attention to long-standing stability of the Park Chung Hee regime (1961-1979), this paper attempts to investigate one way in which repressive regimes generate political legitimacy and examines class politics as a ruling strategy of the regime and its reactions. In the 1960s, both working class and middle class were the beneficiaries of a rapid economic developmental project and pseudo-hegemony was formed corresponding to the expansion of the total economic scale. However, the social base for popular support attenuated in the 1970s as income disparity deepened and political repression grew severe. At times when anti-regime worker mobilization intensified, the urban middle class opted for the status quo aligning themselves with state ideology. In short, working class exclusion and middle class inclusion constituted the central mechanism for the generation of regime legitimacy and the necessary political coalition between the working and middle classes for wide opposition and democratization was blocked.

2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Scherer, Mary. "Upper-middle-class Careerists and Working-class Idealists? Social class, college values, and curricular choices" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1517067_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study examines how academic decision-making, specifically college course selection, is shaped by class-cultural background. While choices are somewhat constrained by scheduling and their program of study, there is still latitude regarding electives and professors. Such decisions draw on beliefs about the purpose and value of higher education, which research suggests varies by social class. Today, however, about a third of first-generation students major in the liberal arts, while continuing generation students are increasingly likely to trade English and Art History for business or pre-med. This paper draws on data from semi-structured interviews with 68 working- and upper-middle-class liberal arts majors at two moderately-selective public universities in the Northeast. A large majority of interviewees believed college coursework would help them achieve well-roundedness and personal development, claiming to value these as much as labor market returns to the degree. However, in practice, only working-class students chose classes in a way that was consistent with a liberal education ethos, while upper-middle-class students prioritized postgraduate success by selecting for reputed "easy A" courses and career prep. These data directly challenge common sense explanations as well as existing studies on the relationship of class background and college beliefs, values, and decisions. I theorize these counterintuitive findings by placing careerism and credentialism in the context of cultural capital theory and social reproduction theory.

2006 - APSA Teaching and Learning Conference Pages: 16 pages || Words: 4052 words || 
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3. Vengroff, Richard. and Bourbeau, James. "In-class vs. On-line and Hybrid Class Participation and Outcomes:Teaching the Introduction to Comparative Politics Class" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the APSA Teaching and Learning Conference, Renaissance Hotel, Washington, DC, Feb 18, 2006 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p101324_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: In this study we compare participation and learning outcomes of students taking the introductory comparative politics class in three different formats, in the traditional, although technology based, classroom with a fully on-line course and a hybrid version. The classes we examine were taught by the same instructor with assistance by the same TA. All three classes were taught using WEBCT, Power Point Slides of the lectures, similar reading and research paper assignments, similar exams, and discussion groups. We provide a preliminary but systematic analysis of :
1. rates of class participation in discussions;
2. the quality of student comments and analysis of critical issues;
3. student performance on required papers;
4. understanding of key concepts in comparative politics, including a differentiation between more and less complex types of material;
5. student satisfaction with the instruction and class material.
The authors hypothesize that the student perceptions and learning outcomes for the two courses will differ significantly between the two introductory political science classes. We then examine some data from a hybrid version of the same course.

2014 - AAAL Annual Conference Words: 50 words || 
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4. Brooks, Lindsay. and Swain, Merrill. "A Comparison of Graduate Students’ Speaking Performances in Three Contexts: TOEFL iBT, In-Class Content Classes, and Out-of-Class Academic Activities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAAL Annual Conference, Portland Marriott Downtown Waterfront, Portland, OR, Mar 22, 2014 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p700409_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper compares 30 international graduate students’ performances on TOEFL iBT speaking tasks and their performances during their real-life academic studies. Based on an analysis of grammatical, discourse, and lexical features in their speaking, we demonstrate that there are some overlapping and some distinct differences in their performances across contexts.

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