Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 23 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next
2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 56 pages || Words: 12906 words || 
Info
1. Hwang, Hokyu., Bromley Martin, Patricia. and Powell, Walter. "Motives and Meanings: Whose Clay and Which Hands Shape Strategic Planning in Nonprofit Organizations?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p308815_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The nonprofit sector in the U.S. has recently experienced widespread moves at importing business practices, resulting in isomorphism among otherwise disparate nonprofits committed to wide-ranging missions. Some organizations successfully appropriate managerial tools for their own purposes, discovering novel uses and meanings of the practices translated from the business sector. Focusing on the practice of strategic planning among a representative sample of nonprofits, we combine quantitative and fsQCA analyses to demonstrate how strategic plans are instantiated and imbued with divergent meanings through various pathways in concrete settings. Edited scripts and heterogeneity in institutionalized practices, therefore, accompany diffusion and isomorphism.

2013 - Northeastern Political Science Association Words: 190 words || 
Info
2. Sable, Marc. "Henry Clay and the Limits of Reformist Liberalism in American Politics" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Northeastern Political Science Association, Sonesta Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, Nov 14, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p679206_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The failure to appreciate Henry Clay’s pragmatic reform politics has led to a systematic misreading of the history of American political culture. Clay pioneered a form of American reform politics which, for reasons of both principle and prudence, eschewed direct discussion of values. In fact, he pioneered an approach to reform politics which constitutes a tradition that continued through the Progressives and the New Deal, up through Barack Obama.
Understanding Clay’s reform liberalism sheds light on three significant issues. First, it explains why Clay, despite being one of the most influential political figures of his day, suffers from oblivion as a political thinker. Second, misreading Clay is part of a canonical “Jacksonian” interpretation of American history which has led very different interpreters—as different as Charles Beard, Louis Hartz and Sean Wilentz—to misunderstand the relationship between populist and reformist impulses in American politics, and, more broadly the nature of conflict over values in American political history. Thirdly, the aversion to open discussion of values in this tradition partly explains both the perpetuation of the Jacksonian interpretation, and the disadvantaged position liberals have faced in contemporary politics.

2016 - American Studies Association Annual Meeting Words: 203 words || 
Info
3. Burford, Mark. "“Like me, he’s awful pretty”: Sam Cooke and Cassius Clay in Miami" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association Annual Meeting, TBA, Denver, Colorado, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1133911_index.html>
Publication Type: Internal Paper
Abstract: Sam Cooke and Cassius Clay shared a nationally televised coming out as intimates in Miami on February 25, 1964 during the chaotic aftermath of Clay’s shocking upset of Sonny Liston that earned him boxing’s heavyweight title. For many, Clay’s histrionic braggadocio, acceptance of the Nation of Islam, and taking of the name Muhammad Ali was an unsettling affront. Yet Cooke praised Clay as “one of the greatest entertainers and showmen” and “a great example for our youth.” In turn, Clay idolized the singer for his talent, independence, and effortless grace: “As you can see, like me, he’s awful pretty.”

One year earlier, Cooke recorded his gritty album Live at the Harlem Square Club in the heart of black Miami, even as his eye remained on upscale venues like the Copacabana. Cooke was also refining his political consciousness, calibrating gains of the civil rights movement against philosophies promulgated by mutual friend Malcolm X. Commentators celebrate Live at the Harlem Square Club and Clay-Liston as triumphs of a politics of style. But Cooke’s professional aspirations and Ali’s emerging iconicity indicate a reciprocal dialogue between entertainers and friends brokering the currency of black masculine public selves at the dawn of the soul era.

2010 - NCA 96th Annual Convention Pages: unavailable || Words: 5024 words || 
Info
4. Brown, Jennifer. "Monsters, of Whom I am Chief: A Metaphoric Criticism of Jars of Clay’s Concept Video, Good Monsters" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Nov 13, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p424223_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study is a rhetorical analysis of the Jars of Clay song and concept video, Good Monsters. The methodology used in this study is metaphoric criticism, which is applied to the lyrics, visual images, and musical movements of the artifact. Through this, representations and allusions are explained. Through this venture into the deeper meaning of a text, a greater understanding of rhetorical message and audience response is achieved.

2016 - AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto Words: 220 words || 
Info
5. Hida, Romi. "Indian Influence in the Iconography and Functions of Clay Tablets Excavated from Xi’an" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AAS-in-Asia, Kyoto, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1100068_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: In this presentation I would like to discuss a group of clay tablets excavated from Xi’an. They have the unusual inscription of “Indian Buddha Image” 印度佛像 stamped on the back side of the tablets, indicating that they are copies of Indian Buddha statues. The image depicted on the front of the tablets is the seated Buddha in bhūmisparśa-mudrā (earth-touching gesture) rendered in “Indian” style. The most notable point is the dharma-verse (Skt; pratītyasamutpāda gātha) stamped beneath the Buddha image. We can find similar tablets in East India. In my opinion, these Xi’an clay tablets were made in the Early Tang, ca. 650~670s, and the producers were court officers who had connections with the famous monk Xuangzang 玄奘. Yijing’s 義浄Nanhai jigui neifa zhuan (南海寄帰内法伝) tells us that in the seventh century Indian Buddhists enshrined two kinds of śarīras (relics) in stūpas; one is the real śarīras of the Buddha and the other is the so called dharma-śarīras (法頌舎利). The clay tablets stamped with the dharma-verse must have functioned as dharma-śarīras. It is said that Xuanzang dedicated over ten million śarīras at the Dayanta 大雁塔, the stūpa that he had designed. I think this refers to the enshrinement of the “Indian Buddha Image” (印度佛像) clay tablets, in the hope that the transcendent power of the dharma-verse would protect the Dayanta stūpa forever.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5  - Next

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy