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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7504 words || 
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1. Zwarun, Lara. "No Client, Non-Profit Client, "Real" Client: Assessing the Effects of Service Learning in an Applied Communication Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Online <PDF>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93210_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Service learning is growing in popularity in classrooms, but not a lot is known about the kinds of outcomes associated with such use. This study considers service learning's effects in an advertising class by comparing academic, civic, career, and personal empowerment outcomes in a service-learning class, an experiential learning class, and a control group. While service learning is shown to have some positive effects, certain outcomes typically associated with service learning are also found in the experiential learning condition.

2005 - The Law and Society Words: 87 words || 
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2. Kritzer, Herbert. "Fee Arrangements, Counting Hours, and Keeping Clients Happy: Lawyers and Their Insurance Company Clients" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society, J.W. Marriott Resort, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17413_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While technically lawyers retained to defend tort claims are working for the tortfeasor, the reality is that insurance companies hire and direct the work of the lawyers. While this can raise some ethical dilemmas for the lawyers, most of the time it does not. The continuing relationship between the lawyer and the insurance company is the dominant element in the day-to-day work of lawyers handling routine tort cases, and for the lawyer there is a constant concern about obtaining future cases from the insurance company.

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 17 pages || Words: 5675 words || 
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3. Trautner, Mary Nell. "Legal Environments and the Constitution of Clients: How Lawyers Screen Cases and Clients" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p19658_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: How do lawyers decide what constitutes a “good” client? How does that definition change across legal environments? This paper explores the social construction of clients and their claims through an analysis of the processes by which plaintiffs’ personal injury lawyers screen potential cases and clients. Whereas previous research has focused nearly exclusively on individual-level cost-benefit analyses associated with the screening process, this project considers the impacts that broader, state-level legal cultures have on the decisions lawyers make about which cases they will accept and which clients they will represent. I explore these questions, and their implications for citizen justice claims, in a comparative study based on in-depth qualitative interviews and ethnographic field observations of 80 products liability and medical malpractice lawyers in four U.S. states, representing two types of state-level legal cultures.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 63 pages || Words: 18702 words || 
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4. Cavanaugh, Jeffrey. "An Empirical Test of the Economic Theory of Alliances: Patron-Client Ties and Client-state military expenditures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178699_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political clientelism offers IR scholars a unique opportunity to test the economic theory of alliances by examining the relationship between the trustworthiness of patron promises to defend clients and the amount of effort clients put into defending themselves. In short, if security relations between closely-aligned states look like insurance markets then moral hazard comes into play and formal alliances and organization reduce client-state military spending. If security relations are more like the traditional public-goods interpretation of alliances, then formal alliances and organization, by helping overcome the collective-action problem, increase client-state military spending. I present evidence that security relations between patron states and client states more accurately reflects the dynmaics of insurance markets than public-goods producing collectives, suggesting our current understanding of US strategic hegemony may be deeply flawed.

2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 105 words || 
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5. Edkins, Vanessa. "Defense attorney plea recommendations and client race: Does zealous representation apply equally to African American and Caucasian clients?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398720_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Research on racism in the justice system generally focuses on the juror, yet the vast majority of guilty convictions are obtained through plea bargains. The current research hypothesizes that criminal defense attorneys give different recommendations for accepting pleas to African American and Caucasian clients. Using practicing defense attorneys as participants, results indicated that pleas recommended to African American clients contained higher sentences than those recommended to Caucasian clients (M=2.89, SD=1.51; M=2.23, SD=1.25, respectively). Reasons for the disparate recommendations were not due to increased perceptions of guilt with the minority client nor to perceptions that the minority client would fare worse at trial.

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