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2006 - International Communication Association Pages: 27 pages || Words: 7504 words || 
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1. Zwarun, Lara. "No Client, Non-Profit Client, "Real" Client: Assessing the Effects of Service Learning in an Applied Communication Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Dresden International Congress Centre, Dresden, Germany, Online <PDF>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p93210_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Service learning is growing in popularity in classrooms, but not a lot is known about the kinds of outcomes associated with such use. This study considers service learning's effects in an advertising class by comparing academic, civic, career, and personal empowerment outcomes in a service-learning class, an experiential learning class, and a control group. While service learning is shown to have some positive effects, certain outcomes typically associated with service learning are also found in the experiential learning condition.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 63 pages || Words: 18702 words || 
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2. Cavanaugh, Jeffrey. "An Empirical Test of the Economic Theory of Alliances: Patron-Client Ties and Client-state military expenditures" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p178699_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Political clientelism offers IR scholars a unique opportunity to test the economic theory of alliances by examining the relationship between the trustworthiness of patron promises to defend clients and the amount of effort clients put into defending themselves. In short, if security relations between closely-aligned states look like insurance markets then moral hazard comes into play and formal alliances and organization reduce client-state military spending. If security relations are more like the traditional public-goods interpretation of alliances, then formal alliances and organization, by helping overcome the collective-action problem, increase client-state military spending. I present evidence that security relations between patron states and client states more accurately reflects the dynmaics of insurance markets than public-goods producing collectives, suggesting our current understanding of US strategic hegemony may be deeply flawed.

2017 - ICA's 67th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Babalola, Stella., Odeku, Mojisola., Akiode, Akinsewa., Cobb, Lisa., Ayankola, John. and Oluwagbohun, Oluwakemi. "Effects of Provider Training on Client-Provider Interactions in Nigeria: A Simulated Client Study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 67th Annual Conference, Hilton San Diego Bayfront, San Diego, USA, May 25, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1219135_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Introduction: For reasons that span demand and supply factors, contraceptive prevalence in Nigeria remains one of the lowest in the world. As part of the efforts of the Gates Foundation-funded Nigerian Urban Reproductive Health Initiative (NURHI) to address supply-side factors, the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs (CCP) worked with the State Ministries of Health and local partners in Nigeria to conduct a five-day training for family planning service providers in Benin city and Zaria. Methods: This study used a pre- and post-training simulated client (SC) approach patterned after the GATHER framework to assess the effects of the training on quality of care from the client’s perspectives. Results: The data showed significant improvements in ratings on individual GATHER (Greet Ask, Tell Help. Explain, Return) dimensions and an increase in overall client satisfaction, including perceived competence and trustworthiness of the provider and likelihood of recommending their services. Nonetheless, the data revealed some significant residual weaknesses in provider skills, especially in relation to the Return Greet, Explain and Ask dimensions. Conclusion: These findings suggest that for ongoing family planning programs, a five-day training could be sufficient to improve the quality of client-provider interactions at a magnitude that could be perceivable to individual users and lead to higher satisfaction in the client pool. Nonetheless, there is need for facilitative supervision and periodic refresher training to continue to support trained providers.

2005 - The Law and Society Words: 87 words || 
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4. Kritzer, Herbert. "Fee Arrangements, Counting Hours, and Keeping Clients Happy: Lawyers and Their Insurance Company Clients" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society, J.W. Marriott Resort, Las Vegas, NV, <Not Available>. 2018-07-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p17413_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: While technically lawyers retained to defend tort claims are working for the tortfeasor, the reality is that insurance companies hire and direct the work of the lawyers. While this can raise some ethical dilemmas for the lawyers, most of the time it does not. The continuing relationship between the lawyer and the insurance company is the dominant element in the day-to-day work of lawyers handling routine tort cases, and for the lawyer there is a constant concern about obtaining future cases from the insurance company.

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