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2010 - Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners Pages: 23 pages || Words: 13610 words || 
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1. Paikowsky, Deganit. "Clubs of People Clubs of States An Interdisciplinary Approach to States' Preferences, Priorities and Policy Making: The Case Study of the Space Club" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p416305_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Incorporating the model of clubs from Sociology, Psychology and Economics to IR provides a workable and useful model to scrutinize and evaluate states' motivations for action. The primary argument of this paper is that “nation-state clubs” as a metaphor, is part of the social interaction of states, and serves international expectations and domestic needs, similar to functions that clubs fulfill in human society. It concentrates on the motivations and preferences of states to invest valuable resources on a large-scale in national space or nuclear programs. These states are perceived in the political discourse as the nuclear or space clubs. It shows that membership in such clubs is a useful tool to project power, improve instrumental capabilities, international status and prestige, strengthen self-esteem and pride of the people and reinforce political support of the regime. The paper is composed of three parts. First it depicts on the role of clubs in human society and scrutinizes the values and functions fulfilled by clubs for humans. Second it draws from the individual level to international relations, stressing similarities and important differences. Third it discusses the dynamics of the space club in the politics of space.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 21 pages || Words: 6999 words || 
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2. Perrone, Dina. "The Club Kids: Escape through the Carnival of Clubbing" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105229_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Club kids frequent clubs with a carnivalesque atmosphere – full of loud music, sporadic lighting, dance and high on drugs - as a means of having fun and escaping the unsatisfying daily life a commercialized and consumed society creates. Carnival spaces become increasingly necessary within highly commercialized, consumed and commodified societies. Such societies create daily lives that are empty of deep, fulfilling content. Carnival spaces provide individuals with controlled hedonistic experiences without threatening or attempting to overthrow the society. In fact, such spaces facilitate the growth of commodified societies since participants can easily escape during carnival to another highly consumed and commercialized culture, and return to their work or school life once it is over. Based on 45 different observations at a variety of clubs and venues along the East Coast of the US (totaling 200 hours in the field) from March 2004 and June 2005, and 18 in depth tape-recorded interviews of club kids (club drug users who frequent dance venues) encountered in the field , this paper will describe the carnival. Paying particular attention to the party themes, music, lighting effects, dancing styles and drug use at clubbing spaces, I will illustrate how clubbing provides a temporary escape based on excess, transgression and concentrated on fun.

2012 - Southern Political Science Association Words: 251 words || 
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3. Lupu, Yonatan. and Greenhill, Brian. ""Clubs of Clubs'': A Networks Approach to the Logic of IGO Membership" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel InterContinental, New Orleans, Louisiana, Jan 12, 2012 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p526930_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Political scientists are paying increasing attention to the effect that shared membership in intergovernmental organizations (IGOs) has in international politics. A number of studies have examined the role that shared membership in IGOs has on dependent variables such as conflict, trade, interest convergence and the diffusion of human rights norms. More recently, scholars have turned their attention to explaining the variation that exists in the extent to which states join IGOs in the first place. In this paper we advance this literature by adopting a network theoretic perspective of IGO membership. Rather than considering the IGO network as simply a collection of ties between states, we consider the ways in which the IGO network can be conceptualized as a number of distinct \emph{communities} that consist of states and IGOs. We posit that accounting for membership in these communities allows IR scholars adopt a more nuanced understanding of the causes and effects of IGO membership. Our argument is that, depending on the logic of IGO joining, we would expect these ``clubs of clubs'' or IGO communities to be defined on differing grounds. In the empirical part of the paper we use the network analytic tool of modularity maximization to detect the IGO communities in the global network for the period 1950-2000. We describe how the IGO communities have developed over time and test the extent to which factors such as development, geography, regime type, alliance ties, language, religion and colonial ties explain the IGO community structure.

2013 - SSSA Annual Meeting Words: 107 words || 
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4. Quinn, James., Forsyth, Craig. and Schmid, Christian. "Interactions between Clubs and Cops: The Evolution of the Conflict between Outlaw Motorcycle Clubs and the Police" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SSSA Annual Meeting, New Orleans Marriott, New Orleans, Louisiana, Mar 27, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p634637_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper examines the evolution of the conflict between the police in general and OMCs. Discussed are the OMCs Penetration of the Legal System and police responses in the United States. International Comparisons are made using specific events: Penetrating the Hells Angels: Operations Roughrider and Cacus; The Impact of Cacus and Roughrider Operation Black Biscuit; Issues Raised by Operation Black Biscuit; Violence Toward Police; Canada’s Response to Biker Warfare; and Scandinavia’s Search for Peace. The specific legislation is eamined The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organization Act (RICO); The Rico Controversy; The Patriot Act and Gang Control; and Developments in Canadian Organized Crime Control.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 115 words || 
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5. May, David. and Payne, Brian. "Do White-Collar Offenders Find Prison More Punitive than Property Offenders? Club Fed or Club Dread?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-10-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1029046_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent research shows that white-collar offenders are increasingly being sentenced to prison and that they are able to adjust to the harsh conditions of the prison environment. Some researchers have noted that white-collar offenders are still, in comparison to street offenders, less likely to be sentenced to prison, with many of the offenders given community-based sanctions. Missing from this literature is an examination of how offenders perceive the range of sanctions applied to white-collar offenders. To fill this gap, in this paper, exchange rate theory is used to compare the way that white-collar offenders and property offenders rank the severity of various sanctions. Implications for policy and future research are provided.

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