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2005 - American Society of Criminology Words: 214 words || 
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1. Daly, Reagan. "Co-offenders or Co-offenses? The Relative Influence of Individual Characteristics and Situational Factors on Juvenile Co-offending" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology, Royal York, Toronto, Nov 15, 2005 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p33004_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Differential association (Sutherland 1939) is one of the most significant theories of peer influence that exists in the field of criminology. It has been tested countless times over the years, but most of these tests have measured delinquent associations as number or proportion of delinquent friends. This study expands on previous tests of differential association theory because it is based on actual co-offending behavior. In other words, I explore the influence of ties between delinquents that represent shared criminal activity rather than other associations between delinquent peers that do not necessarily equate to participation in the same crime events. Using data collected by the Program Development and Evaluation System (ProDES) on delinquents adjudicated by the Philadelphia juvenile court system and assigned to treatment between 1994 and 2002, I test the impact of co-offending on future offending in a series of binary logistic and Poisson regressions. The independent variable is a binary measure for whether or not an individual’s first adjudicated/assigned offense is a solo or co-offense, and I test the impact of this variable on several measures of recidivism during a two-year follow-up period. In each model I also include variables that control for both demographic and offending history characteristics and alternative theoretical explanations (social control, strain theory).

2013 - Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Words: 50 words || 
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2. Jones, Darolyn "Lyn"., Blanch, Christina., Markle, Larry. and Wessel, Roger. "Co-Investigating, Co-Interviewing, and Co-Coding: An Insider and an Outsider Team up to Research Students Who Use Wheelchairs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Ninth Annual Congress of Qualitative Inquiry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, May 15, 2013 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p633700_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Learn how an insider and an outsider with very different backgrounds came together to research a unique topic and then navigated the challenges of co-investigating, co-interviewing, and co-coding their study of undergraduate wheelchair users and their parents. Interview protocols, technology, and making meaning tips and tricks will be shared.

2016 - CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships Words: 134 words || 
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3. Bell, Tim., Venuta, Rosa. and McGavin, Colleen. "“Co-Everything”: Co-designing and co-building a foundational curriculum for patient-oriented research." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships, Crowne Plaza French Quarter, New Orleans, LA, May 11, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1099175_index.html>
Publication Type: Roundtable discussion
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Patient-oriented research refers to a continuum of research that engages patients as partners, focusses on patient-identified priorities, and improves outcomes for patients.

Engaging patients in research has shown to lead to better and more responsive results – but creating and supporting a research process that meaningfully engages, empowers and integrates patients (including their families) throughout represents a major culture shift and learning opportunity.

Canada’s Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research (SPOR) is making a much needed system change to support and build capacity for these types of collaborations in research.

In this round-table discussion, hear from patients, education experts and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) as they reflect upon co-designing and co-developing a new Foundational Curriculum for Patient-Oriented Research that aims to enable research partnerships that will lead to a more equitable and sustainable health system.

2007 - International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention Pages: 25 pages || Words: 9022 words || 
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4. Shepperd, Taryn. "Sino-U.S. Relations Into The 21st Century: A 'Strategic Opening': Conflict, Co-operation or Co-existence?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Studies Association 48th Annual Convention, Hilton Chicago, CHICAGO, IL, USA, Feb 28, 2007 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p179377_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The 1990's saw an increase in tensions in Sino-U.S. relations, particularly over human rights, trade, proliferation and Taiwan. However, the events of 9/11 focused U.S. attention on the Middle East and allowed China's rise on the international scene, and its' modernization efforts, to go largely unnoticed in the public realm-until recently that is. With China's rising power (politically, economically and militarily) gaining increasing publicity, Sino-U.S. relations are likely to be Washington's most problematic in the near future. China, representing the most obvius threat to U.S. hegemony, can no longer be ignored.I am investigating the relationship between foreign policy and political identity, and how such processes shape these two states' interactions with one another. I propose to analyse the political discourse in each states' foreign policy documents as a means of identifying the shared ideas and analytical frameworks by which policy makers analyse the relationship, generate policy options, and then select their actions/reactions. I wish to pay particular attention to how the discussion of China has changed in U.S. foreign policy discourse. How has China come to be constructed as the 'next superpower'? Identities are a key source for shaping a state's foreign policy decisions and form the basis for interaction. Why are certain courses of action taken rather than others? The constructed identity guides a state's interest and its' policies and choices. I intend to investigate the mutual constitution of the structures, norms and practices that constitute both the U.S. and China's foreign policies towards each other.The initial expetation was one of great power conflict. However, there have in fact been increasing levels of economic interdependence and political co-operation by both states. It is my belief that the Chinese have been politically astute at a time when the U.S. has tended towards controversy in its foreign policies. The U.S. has made a number of efforts to thwart Chinese efforts for international recognition e.g. its accession to the WTO, and 2000 Olympic bid. And yet China has continued to voice its' principles of peaceful co-existence, and been careful not to present itself as a belligerent or aggresive power. However, whilst co-operative efforts have been made, there have been a number of periodic collisions which have threatened the relationship. These have tended to revolve around issues deemed to be interference in its internal affairs by Beijing, such as the Taiwan Straits crisis of 1994-5, the spy plane incident in 2001, the continuing Diaoyu Islands territorial dispute, the embassy bombing in Belgrade, and continuing accusations regarding human rights abuses. Interactions between the U.S. and China over these issues have run contrary to the increasing momentum of U.S.-China relations and the positive steps that have been made. Each issue has the potential to undermine any success that has been made in their positive identity constructions. It is no coincidence that each instance relates to China's territorial integrity.This paper offers a constructivist analysis of Sino-U.S. relations in the post-Cold War context as a contemporary issue with considerable potential ramifications for the international environment. I am investigating the construction of U.S. and Chinese identities within the context of their interactions with one another, paying particular attention to why the relationship, as predicted by many, developed into a conflictual one? Realists would see China's rise as a threat to U.S. interests, and therefore a source of geopolitical rivalry. So why has this not been the case?I want to avoid a purely western-centric approach and offer a more balanced analysis of the mutual consitution of U.S. and Chinese identity. Using specific case studies which allow for a more thorough, empirical example of how these states interact with one another at particular junctures, I hope to link the theoretical world with one of policy.I aim to highlight some of the unquantifiable factors that tend to be overlooked by rationalist theories. I question why so many are pessimistic about the future of Sino-U.S. relations. Rationalist approaches have been unable to address such questions. I believe that a constructivist analysis lends itself to a better investigation of the relationship between these two countries, and how they have managed to build a co-operative relationship.

2008 - The Law and Society Association Words: 185 words || 
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5. O'Byrne, Nicole. "Colonialism, Co-option, or Co-operation? Saskatchewan's Aboriginal and Natural Resources Policies in North (1930-1964)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Hilton Bonaventure, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, May 27, 2008 <Not Available>. 2020-02-18 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p235478_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The terms of The British North America Act, 1930 (the NRTAs) provided for the transfer of the administration and control of the natural resources of Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Manitoba from the federal government to respective provincial governments. After the transfer, the federal government and the government of Saskatchewan implemented a series of cost-sharing programs designed to develop natural resources industries such as fishing, forestry, and fur-trapping in order to sustain the Aboriginal population, including Métis and non-status Indians, in the north. The various programs (i.e. the Northern Saskatchewan Conservation Board, the Saskatchewan Fur Marketing Service, the Saskatchewan Fish Marketing Board) were based on co-operative models that had been successful in the southern regions of the province where the majority of the population was non-Aboriginal. However, for a number of reasons that I explore in the paper, these programs often did not meet with the same degree of success in the North. This historical study offers insights into the efficacy of economic policies and regulatory regimes designed and implemented by non-Aboriginal governments in order to address the economic conditions of Aboriginal peoples.

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