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2015 - LRA 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Wang, Elaine., Matsumura, Lindsay. and Correnti, Richard. "Implemented Writing Tasks and Student Cognition: An Examination of Thinking and Reasoning in “High Quality” Student Responses to Cognitively Demanding Writing Tasks" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the LRA 65th Annual Conference, Omni La Costa Resort and Spa, Carlsbad, CA, Dec 02, 2015 Online <IMAGE/PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1028591_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed

2005 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 6276 words || 
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2. Shelly, Ann. and Shelly, Robert. "Cognitive Behavior, Cognitive Development, and Emergence of Inequality in Learning Groups:Implications for the Classroom" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Marriott Hotel, Loews Philadelphia Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 12, 2005 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p22660_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The current political environment, specifically No Child Left Behind, has given sociologists, educators and those interested in the environment of the public schools added impetus to do several things. First, it is critical to bring into the pedagogical discussion the research from related disciplines. Sociologists have studied the emergence of inequality in small groups for decades. This has become the base in our study of collaborative learning groups. We will summarize the current research and describe the on-going efforts in this area. Second, it is equally critical that we operationalize the theoretical base related to cognitive development, most especially the work of Piaget, Arlin, and other cognitive psychologists. This operational definition focuses on the outward and visible sign, that of cognitive behavior, as it relates to collaborative learning groups. We will discuss the current status of that research and the planned steps to continue both validation and reliability checks for the coding. Third, the relationship between the emergence of inequality, cognitive behavior, and the nature of the task provides the basis for prediction about the effectiveness of collaborative learning groups and about ways to make collaborative learning groups more effective in producing learning in individuals.

2009 - ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting Words: 188 words || 
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3. Galluccio, Mauro. and Nigro, Giovanna. "Cognitive-emotional processes and social mechanisms in international negotiations: A Cognitive Motivational Viewpoint" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, Jul 14, 2009 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p308354_index.html>
Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The selective moral disengagement is the result of different psychological mechanisms (influenced by personal relationships, media and communication processes in general), which “push” a person to act, tolerate, or back morally censurable behaviours, temporarily deactivating, in a selective way, some of the cognitive-emotional functions of the self-regulatory moral system (which is active in each person).
We propose a cognitive-motivational viewpoint for the International negotiation to investigate how feelings of self-confidence, self-efficacy, and resilience may influence perceptions and how they may be improved by an efficient meta-cognitive mastery function. We define as mastery the resources or mental abilities that we activate to face complex situations. The awareness of one’s own mental states and processes along with comprehension of other people’s mental states and the ability to rule problematic conditions are considered a factor of social adaptation (internal and external). We propose a training programme for politicians, negotiators, and mediators through which certain skills and competencies can be promoted among participants to try to foster violence prevention as well as problem solving modalities.

References
Aquilar, F., Galluccio, M. (2008); Psychological Processes in International Negotiation. Theoretical and Practical Perspectives. New York: Springer.

2015 - 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society Words: 698 words || 
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4. Kam, Jihye. "The impact of bullying and being bullied experiences on the development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills in adolescence" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 59th Annual Conference of the Comparative and International Education Society, Washington Hilton Hotel, Washington D.C., Mar 08, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p976233_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study aims at exploring the extent to the teasing and bullying experiences of youth as the bully, the victim, or both affect the development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills based on primary socialization theory (Oetting & Donnermeyer, 1998) incorporated with defiance theory (Sherman, 1993) using the data sets from the Korea Youth Panel Survey (KYPS). The KYPS, a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescent in South Korea, has followed the 2003 cohort of 3,449 students in the 8th grade through the recent year. A dynamic micro-founded model with unobservable latent variables that influence bullying involvement and bullied victimization in adolescence is developed and estimated to provide the implications of optimal statewide bullying laws and policies. The associations between bullying or being bullied experiences and family backgrounds with respect to parental socioeconomic status are examined in this study with the underlying assumptions that there are clearly identifiable characteristics of the perpetrators and the victims. The proposed research questions are: (1) To what extent do parental characteristics explain bullying perpetration and bullied victimization in adolescence? (2) Until when do those bullying and being bullied experiences continue to affect the development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills? (3) Are there significant differences observed in the ranges of periods to overcome the bullying-related trauma across family backgrounds? (4) Which policy interventions should be implemented for encouraging the adolescents to overcome their teasing and bullying experiences?
The recent literatures explored causes of bullying by recognizing bullying behaviors as protection of self-esteem (Baumeister, 1994, 1998; Baumeister, Bushman, & Campbell, 2000; Einarsen et al., 2007; Parkins, Fishbein, & Ritchey, 2006; Stucke, 2002), a lack of social competencies (Coyne, Seigne, & Randall, 2003; Jenkins et al., 2010; Matthiesen & Einarsen, 2007), micropolitical activities (Einarsen, Hoel, & Notelaers, 2009; Hoel et al., 2003; Salin, 2003). According to social identity theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1986), individuals who do not belong to the group are regarded as “one of them” and not “one of us,” which reveals the salience and outsider position of the victim (Zapf & Einarsen, 2009). Based on those literatures, anti-bullying legislation has been enacted in order to reduce bullying against students as part of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act . Despite the extensive examination of causes of bullying behaviors in adolescence, further research is necessary to fill the gap in the literatures by empirically analyzing the determinants and consequences of bullying and being bullied experiences of the youth. A little literature in this area accounts for how family backgrounds in terms of socioeconomic status influence the risk of bullying or being bullied and the ranges of period to overcome psychological trauma. This study intends to contribute to literatures by examining a setting where the concerns for the impact of bullying experiences as the bully, the victim, or both on the development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills over six years across different family backgrounds.
As the number of bullying incidents in the school increases, the impact of bullying-related experiences on the development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills among the bullies and the victims deserves more in-depth research. KYPS comprises of sets of survey instruments for student and parent. These longitudinal data sets provide rich information on variables related to demographic characteristics, both cognitive and non-cognitive skills, bullying and being bullied experiences, family backgrounds, and so on. Thus, KYPS allows assessment of determinants and consequences of bullying and being bullied experiences. Few studies have provided important insights using rich information for the bullies and the victims. This research proposes to investigate how bullying-related experiences influence the development of cognitive and non-cognitive skills in adolescence across different family backgrounds.
The fixed-effect estimation is used to fit the model in which the assumptions of correct specification of bullying and being bullied roles and the profiles associated with these roles are derived. The findings of this study suggest that lower cognitive skills significantly influence both the bullying and being bullied experiences regardless of parental characteristics but family’s socioeconomic status is strongly related to the range of transition periods to overcome the bullying-related experiences. Furthermore, the bullying experiences as the victims are found to have a considerably negative effect on the development of non-cognitive skills in adolescence.

2006 - American Sociological Association Pages: 19 pages || Words: 5591 words || 
Info
5. Lambrix, Marcie. "Mild Cognitive Impairment: Medicalizing Age Related Cognitive Change, Who Truly Benefits?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Montreal Convention Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada, Aug 10, 2006 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p105109_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This paper will discuss the concept of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), highlighting the ambiguities surrounding symptom identification, diagnosis and treatment. I explore the issue of beneficence, questioning whether the diagnostic entity of MCI does more harm than good by contrasting the medical and social constructionist models of illness. I argue that the biomedical community’s effort to medicalize the aging brain has been more harmful than helpful, as it has led to the labeling and stigmatization of individuals and their loved ones. Furthermore, I maintain that this recent push to medicalize the aging mind largely due to the efforts of the select few who stand to reap enormous economic rewards. I support this postulate by examining the highly profitable anti-aging market, exposing the unethical social exchange relationship enjoyed by drug companies, academic researchers, and clinicians. I conclude by suggesting that the cultural shift in our understanding and accepting of MCI as a diagnostic entity is not merely coincidental, but rather, concomitant to the aging explosion of the baby boom generation.

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