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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Gehrau, Volker. "Media Effects on Adolescents’ Cognitive Set of Occupations: Another Look at Media and Cognitive Accessibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107399_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The paper outlines media effects on cognitive sets of occupations and their impact on occupational aspirations of adolescents. At first, media effects on the occupational orientation of adolescents are scrutinized. At second, media effects on cognitive accessibility are focused in this context. At third, survey data from panel analysis of 3,300 pupils in Germany is presented. The results indicate that occupational related television use (e.g. watching television programs related to health occupations) enhances the probability of related occupations to be part of the cognitive set of occupations as well as to occupy more prior positions in the cognitive set of occupations. Finally, the cognitive set of occupations supports developing occupational aspirations which in the literature is regarded as beneficial factor for a successful occupational orientation.

2010 - American Psychology - Law Society Words: 101 words || 
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2. Gordon, Trina. and Brodsky, Stanley. "Exploration of cognitive empathy and need for cognition differences in capital juror decision-making." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Psychology - Law Society, Westin Bayshore Hotel, Vancouver, BC, Canada, Mar 18, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p398758_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The present research explored the cognitive components of empathy in mock juror decision-making when given emotional information present in victim impact statements. The role of individual differences (cognitive empathy and need for cognition-NFC) impact on different types of evidence and sentencing recommendations was explored. One-hundred and eighty-eight participants were randomly assigned to one of six study conditions. The six study conditions produced a 2 (high aggravating vs. low aggravating) by 3 (sad vs. angry vs. no impact statement) mixed between-groups design. Results revealed significant interaction effect between impact groups/empathy groups and empathy/NFC groups. Study implications will be discussed.

2011 - SASE Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 5599 words || 
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3. Diani, Morad. "Southern Economies within Cognitive Capitalism: Exploring the Ways of Bridging the Exogenous Failures of International Cognitive Division of Labor and Endogenous Failings of Regimes of Accumulation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SASE Annual Conference, Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain, Madrid, Spain, Jun 23, 2011 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p505416_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The most of Southern economies have no prerequisites and absorptive capacities which allow them to be inserted properly into the cognitive capitalism. Thus, the new “knowledge-based” and “globalized” economy does not seem to have modified the international configuration of development. To the contrary, the “St. Matthew effect” seems to play even more against Southern economies and further aggravate the development gap. For their majority, they remain impoverished and a profound cognitive gap separates them from the most advanced economies. This paper tries to explore the ways of bridging the exogenous failures of international cognitive division of labor and endogenous failings of regimes of accumulation by means of the key notion of “national innovation systems”.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Schuiringa, Hilde., Van Nieuwenhuijzen, Maroesjka., Orobio de Castro, Bram., Van Rest, Maaike., Vriens, Aart., Embregts, Petri. and Matthys, Walter. "Social Cognitions and Externalizing Behavior in Children With Low Cognitive Functioning" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p959542_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Children with low cognitive functioning are at higher risk of developing externalizing behavior and are overrepresented in residential care and justice systems compared to children with average intelligence (Dekker & Koot, 2002; Kaal, 2010; Konijn, De Graaf, & Van den Berg, 2004; Kroll et al., 2002). While significant deficits in executive functions (EF) have been detected in children with externalizing behavior and average intelligence, it is not yet clear if such deficits are also associated with the occurrence of externalizing behavior in children with low cognitive functioning. The main goal of study 1 is to examine the relation between EF and externalizing behavior in this target group. Another child factor that is associated with externalizing behavior in both children with and without low cognitive functioning is social information processing (SIP) (i.e. Dodge & Pettit, 2003; Van Nieuwenhuijzen et al., 2005). It likely requires EF to perform SIP, for example to enable the child to integrate information about intent and to reach a decision for behavior (Cushman, Sheketoff, Wharton, & Carey, 2013; McQuade et al., 2013). Therefore, it is important to know how SIP and EF are related. The main goal of study 2 is to provide insight into the relation between the cognitive mechanisms SIP and EF in adolescents with externalizing behavior and low cognitive functioning.
In study 1 we assessed three EF components (inhibition, cognitive flexibility, and working memory) in 9-16 year old children with low cognitive functioning and externalizing behavior receiving specialized treatment (n=71) versus children with low cognitive functioning and no such behavior problems (n=70). EF was measured using a well-established computerized test battery, the Amsterdam Neuropsychological Test (ANT; De Sonneville, 1999). ANCOVA analyses revealed that even after IQ was controlled for, children with low cognitive functioning and externalizing behavior showed more impaired working memory performance. Differences for inhibition performance were also found but less consistent across the tasks used. Cognitive flexibility was not more impaired in children with low cognitive functioning and externalizing behavior relative to children with low cognitive functioning and no such problems (see Table 1).
In study 2, participants were 94 respondents with low cognitive functioning and externalizing behavior living in secure residential facilities aged 12 to 20. In order to measure the EF focused attention, inhibition and working memory, subtests from the ANT were used. SIP was measured by using video vignettes (Van Rest et al., 2014). Multiple regression analyses showed a combination of different EF related to SIP skills. Problems in focused attention and inhibition were related to hostile interpretations. Impaired working memory was related to aggressive response generation. All EF were related to evaluation and selection of aggressive responses (see Table 2).
Our findings highlight working memory as potential target to enhance the treatment of children with low cognitive functioning and externalizing behavior problems. In addition, SIP and EF revealed to partly relate, indicating the possibility to integrate EF and SIP in intervention programs aimed to reduce externalizing behavior problems in children with low cognitive functioning in residential facilities.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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5. Lee, Hae Yeon. and Yeager, David. "The Social-Cognitive Roots of Peer Exclusion in High School: Dynamics in Social Goals, Cognitive Styles and Hormonal Reactivity" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, Mar 19, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-06-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962859_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Poster
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: High school years are often characterized with social labels—“bullies”, “nerds”, and “queen bees” —that reveal individuals’ social status and popularity in peer groups. It is no surprise that school transition period often coincides with many forms of social struggles that were to gain or avoid such labels from peers (Eckert, 1989; Crosnoe, 2011). However, can such seemingly innocuous labels promote peer exclusion in high school? Or, does the belief that such social labels like “winners” or “losers” are fixed traits instigate social aggression among adolescents? In this paper, we investigate the social-cognitive roots of peer exclusion in high school. With multi-levels of methods, our study highlights the interplay between social goals, cognitive styles and hormonal reactivity in understanding the causal mechanisms of social aggression in adolescence.
We conducted a 7-month longitudinal field study with N~350 9th grade high school freshmen. Participants have completed total ten waves of daily assessments over the first year of high school. In the beginning of the study, we measured students’ implicit theories of personality, social demonstration goals, and self-reported relational bullying. To examine adolescents’ cognitive styles, we used novel social cognitive tasks. In the sorting task, we measured how spontaneously teenagers make snap judgments on peers based on their popularity (e.g., “S/He was often invited to parties”, see Figure 1). In the following day, we administered a brief psychological intervention of the implicit theories of personality, teaching kids that people like “bullies” or “victims” can change. Five days after the intervention, students (N~200) completed daily salivary hormone assessments for a week period. Collected samples were analyzed for daily testosterone to cortisol (T:C) ratios as a physiological marker of social aggression (Glenn, Raine, Schug, Gao, & Granger, 2011). At 7-months follow-up, we tracked whether the intervention had treatment effects on reducing bullying.
First, we found that 9th grade adolescents were more likely to say they would exclude peers when their stated goal in high school was to avoid demonstrating low social status. The intervention weakened such social demonstration goals at 7-month follow-up (p = .024). Second, adolescents with a measured entity theory at baseline were more quickly sorting unpopular peers together, whereas the intervention attenuated such cognitive tendencies at 7-months follow up (p= .025). Third, hormone analysis revealed that adolescents who were more aggressive at baseline showed significant reduction in T:C ratio in 8-9 days after the intervention (p = .009). Based on the observed treatment effects, we propose causal meditational mechanisms of relational bullying. In the preliminary meditational model analyses, we found significant indirect effects on self-reported bullying at 7-month later that were mediated by social goals (indirect effects p= .029) and sorting speeds (indirect effects p= .026, see Figure 2). Further analyses will be carried out to reveal the dynamic interplays between adolescents’ social demonstration goals, cognitive hyper-vigilance toward status cues, and subsequent physiological reactivity.

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