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2007 - Midwest Political Science Association Pages: 49 pages || Words: 16049 words || 
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1. Atkinson, Matthew. "Why Does Macropartisanship Vary Substantially from Cohort to Cohort?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Midwest Political Science Association, Palmer House Hotel, Chicago, IL, Apr 12, 2007 <Not Available>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p199500_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Macropartisanship varies substantially from cohort to cohort. Much of this variation is attributable to partisan generational effects. Using Sears and Valentino’s (1997) theory of event-driven political socialization, I argue that partisan generational effects are caused by the national policy mood during a cohort’s impressionable adolescent years. To test this hypothesis, I first measure changes in partisan generational effects using nearest neighbor matching to control for the demographic compositional factors that might also contribute to macropartisanship change across cohorts, and, then, show that changes in policy mood liberalism substantially explain the estimated differences in partisan generational effects from cohort to cohort.

2014 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 4809 words || 
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2. Luo, Liying. and Hodges, James. "A New Age-Period-Cohort Model for Describing and Investigating Inter- and Intra-Cohort Effects" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco Union Square and Parc 55 Wyndham San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 15, 2014 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p726884_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social scientists have frequently attempted to decompose temporal trends in various outcomes into three aspects of time processes: age, period, and cohort. The analytical problem that has faced researchers for decades is that these three distinct processes are linearly related to each other (cohort = period - age), so disaggregation of temporal trends has to rely on statistical assumptions that are difficult to verify. In this paper, we develop and introduce a new method, called the age-period-cohort-interaction (APC-I) model, for analyzing age, period, and cohort effects. Compared with other age-period-cohort methods, the APC-I model has two advantages: First, it does not rely on problematic statistical assumptions. Second, while other methods assume that cohort effects are constant from birth to death, the new APC-I model relaxes this assumption and allows researchers to test hypotheses about changes within cohorts. The APC-I method can provide fresh perspectives about how time and social events interact with social institutions such as family and schools to produce social inequality and affect population processes. Using 1974 to 2012 data from the General Social Survey, we demonstrate how this new model can be used to investigate inter- and intra-cohort variation in Americans’ political views.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 10283 words || 
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3. Wagmiller, Robert. and Lee, Kristen. "Cohort Replacement, Intra-cohort Change, and the Diverging Structures of Black and White Men’s Employment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p562449_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Social scientists such as William Julius Wilson contend that employment rates for black men not only have declined sharply over the last half century, but that the contemporary structure of black male joblessness is historically unique. Black male joblessness today is exceptional, from this perspective, because unemployment and labor force nonparticipation are concentrated to an unprecedented degree among the young and less educated. We use data from the 1962-2009 March Current Population Surveys and linear decomposition techniques to examine the mechanisms generating change in employment rates for white and black men and for white and black men with different levels of education. We find that not only did the overall magnitude of change in employment differ by race and education, but so too did the mechanisms generating change. Black men with less than a college degree experienced sharper declines in employment than did black men with a college degree or white men. Cohort replacement processes played a more prominent role in employment declines for black men with less than a college degree than for other men, who were affected more strongly by intracohort change mechanisms. Stronger cohort replacement effects and weaker intracohort change effects for black men – particularly for black men without a high school diploma – concentrated joblessness to an unparalleled extent among younger black men with the least formal schooling.

2009 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 34 pages || Words: 8326 words || 
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4. Yang, Yang., Frenk, Steven. and Land, Kenneth. "Assessing the Significance of Cohort and Period Effects in Hierarchical Age-Period-Cohort Models" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, Aug 08, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-19 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p307398_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Many areas of social science research are concerned with time-specific phenomena that can be represented in age, period, and/or cohort effects. Recent methodological development emphasizes the opportunities provided by micro datasets in the form of repeated cross-section surveys that are increasingly available. Such designs provide multilevel data structures of individual respondents nested in survey periods and birth cohorts for which a hierarchical age-period-cohort (HAPC) modeling framework that does not incur the identification problem recently was introduced by Yang and Land. In this modeling context, however, the questions arise: How can one assess or judge the significance of estimates of cohort and period effects in such models? How does one assess the overall statistical significance of the cohort and/or the period effects? Beyond statistical significance is the question of substantive significance. This paper addresses these questions. In the context of empirical applications of linear and generalized linear mixed model specification of HAPC models, we describe a four-step approach and set of guidelines for assessing statistical significance. The guidelines include assessments of patterns of effects and statistical tests both for the effects of individual cohorts and time periods as well as for entire sets of cohorts and periods. Applications of our approach to more complicated generalized linear mixed models and alternative testing strategies are described in the concluding section.

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