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2013 - International Communication Association Pages: unavailable || Words: 7369 words || 
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1. Velasquez, Alcides. and Larose, Robert. "Collective Activism Through Social Media: The Role of Collective Efficacy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Hilton Metropole Hotel, London, England, Jun 17, 2013 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p639771_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The concept of internal political efficacy has been used to examine the relationship between social media and political activism. However, this concept only explains individual participation, while many political actions are performed collectively. Based on Socio-cognitive theory this study propounds the concepts of online political self and collective efficacy and explores their relationships to individual and collective participation. Findings of a survey of members of three activist groups of a US Mid-Western university (n=222) suggest that a correspondence exists between online self and collective efficacy perceptions and the level of agency at which the political activities are performed. Online collective efficacy perceptions influence individuals’ participation in collective actions, but this relationship is moderated by the perceived interdependence of the activities.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Milan, Stefania. "Algorithms and Collective Action: Between Collective Identity and Visibility" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1106638_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How does the algorithmically mediated environment of social media re-structure social action? This paper combines social movement studies and science and technology studies to investigate how social media mediate the organization, unfolding, and diffusion of contemporary protests. It examines how activists leverage the technical properties of social media to develop a joint narrative and a collective identity, and offers the notion of cloud protesting as a theoretical approach and framework for empirical analysis. Cloud protesting indicates a specific type of mobilization is grounded on, modeled around, and enabled by social media platforms and mobile devices and the virtual universes they identify. It emphasizes both the importance of activists’ sense-making activities, and the productive mediation of social and mobile media. The article shows how the specific materiality of social media intervenes in the actors’ sense-making activities by fostering four mechanisms—namely performance, interpellation, temporality, and reproducibility—which concur to create a ‘politics of visibility’ that alters traditional identity dynamics. In addition, it exposes the connection between organizational patterns and the role of individuals, explaining how the politics of visibility is the result of a process that originates and ends within the individual—which ultimately creates individuals-in-the-group rather than groups.

2016 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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3. Matsueda, Ross., Robbins, Blaine. and Pfaff, Steven. "Collective Goods and the Propensity to Protest: Testing A Structural-Cognitive Model of Collective Action" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, WA, Aug 17, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-09-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1120091_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Drawing on rational choice theories of selective incentives, critical mass theories of production functions, and interactionist theories of collective action frames, this article specifies an integrated theory of student protest against tuition increases. The authors administered a factorial survey, in which the social context of student protests is varied by randomizing dimensions of the context, which correspond to theoretical independent variables predicting likelihood that the protest will succeed and propensity to protest. The analysis, using a multi-level mixed-effects structural equation model, yields four major results. First, contrary to resource mobilization perspectives, the magnitude of the grievance (tuition increase) is strongly related to protest success and propensity. Second, consistent with utility theories of selective incentives, both positive and negative selective incentives affect the likelihood of protesting. Third, number of participants is positively associated at a diminishing rate with likelihood that the protest succeeds and that the respondent will join the project, suggesting decelerating production and mobilization functions, and negative interdependence among protestors. Fourth, likelihood of success mediates much of the effect of social context on propensity to protest, implying that actors consider the effect of incentives on their own behavior and that of other potential protestors as well.

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