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2010 - 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 65 words || 
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1. Lindsey, Howard. "Chocolate City With Colonial Fillings; Detroit, Michigan as Colony and Neo-Colony" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399575_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black America is a 'domestic colony' of White America. It parallels the relationship between England and the thirteen colonies before the American Revolutionary War. The concept is centered on economic control by the 'mother country'--White America-- over the colonial subjects, Black America. For a closer examination of this model, the city of Detroit will be used to illustrate the colonial/neo-colonial model in a contemporary setting.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 251 words || 
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2. Kim, Yerhee. "Colonial Modernity and Decadence in Korea under Japanese Colonial Rule: Aesthetics and Politics of Colonial Modernism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1191299_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Modern times are experienced in the paradoxical movement of progress and destruction. Modernity itself involves the ambivalent features of progress and decline, so historical advance can be also perceived as the history of decadence. Interestingly, in colonial space both aspects of the progress and decline of modernity are experienced at the same time. It is not decline of progressed objects, but it is progress itself is experienced as decline. For example, the more modern buildings and roads were constructed, the more Koreans perceived the colonized urban space as ruined. Lee Sang describes well such perception in his literature. In this sense, it can be said that modernity experienced in colonized space reflects the bare face of modernity, and colonialism is structured into modernity itself. Thus, discussion on modernity needs to start from a colonized space, not from Europe, the birthplace of modernity.
This paper first looks into the genealogy of decadent literature in modern Korean literature, and later discusses unique aesthetics of modernity under the colonial rule and its political implications. Kim Dong-in, Yi Sang, and Seo Jeong-ju and Oh Jang-hwan, who took part in the publication of Siin Burak (Village of Poets) will be in the center of the discussion. Approaching colonial modernity from the perspective of decadence, this study more meaningfully attempts to find the spiritual root of Yi Sang’s literature, which is considered core of modern literature of Korea, from Kim Dong-in’s. Furthermore, the unique aesthetics of colonial modernity is examined under the paradoxical relation of modernity and decadence.

2013 - The Law and Society Association Words: 463 words || 
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3. McKinson, Kimberley. "Colonial Legacies and Post-Colonial Destinies: Spatio-Temporality, Mobility and Corporality in Jamaica" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Law and Society Association, Sheraton Boston Hotel, Boston, MA, May 30, 2013 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p646521_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: On August 6, 1962 after 307 years of colonial shackles, Jamaica became an independent nation. The Union Jack was officially lowered and the lustrous black, green and gold flag, symbol of the fledgling nation, was reverently hoisted into a Jamaican night sky. In 1962, ubiquitous optimism masked the color and social divisions - residues of an eonian British rule – which would reveal themselves in due time. In his message to the newly independent nation, Jamaica’s first Prime Minister, Sir Alexander Bustamante remarked, “independence means the opportunity for us to frame our own destiny and the need to rely on ourselves in so doing. It does not mean a license to do as we like. It means work and law and order.” Today, Jamaica’s post-colonial reality is defined in great part by narratives of security and safety. When BBC Caribbean proclaimed Jamaica as the “murder capital of the world” in 2006, the news caused no national alarm. If anything, this news merely added to the steady stream of narratives proliferated by the Jamaican media regarding the island’s crime statistics and seemingly futile attempts by the government to tame the crime monster, especially in the capital’s most vicious poor and urban communities. In this paper, I use Bustamante’s imagining of a lawful and orderly post-colonial destiny shaped not by a past marred by slavery and colonialism as a way to think through the relationship between Jamaican colonial and post-colonial legal discourse. Through an analysis of colonial legislation regarding slave movement and contemporary Jamaican law regarding urban curfews and stop and search operations I question the ways in which legal discourse organized black slave bodies and continues to organize poor urban bodies in Jamaica. The specific attention of the law to mobility and immobility in Jamaica speaks to concerns about criminality, victim-hood, property and security. I question legally and corporally, where the jurisdiction of the state ends and where that of the subject begins in the constitution of the colonial and post-colonial body. By focusing on bodies that attempt to strategically move through colonial and post-colonial landscapes I theorize on the spatio-temporal manifestation of legal discourse of the present through legacies of the past. I ask how it is that the law enables and disables new spatialities, temporalities and corporalities. I question additionally how law and society scholars can begin to think critically not only of moments of mobility but also moments of immobility and stasis as productive spaces in which surveillance, governmental discipline, place and belonging come to be re-imagined. This paper suggests that an analysis of the dialectical relationship between colonial pasts and post-colonial presents and futures offers more nuanced ways for thinking about the challenges of nations such as Jamaica in dealing with the failure of post-colonial dreams and unfulfilled destinies.

2012 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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4. Berda, Yael. "Administrative Memory and Colonial Legacy: Colonial Emergency Defense Regulations in Israel and India" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Colorado Convention Center and Hyatt Regency, Denver, CO, Aug 16, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p563365_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Administrative structures and legal tools survive regime change, showing how bureaucratic continuity, rather than political transformation, is the principle feature of regime change. This article explores the relationship between the use of emergency powers in new states and their colonial pasts, examining how British colonial administrative structures created during the Mandate of Palestine (1923-1947) were used to fashion Israel’s rule of the Occupied Territories in 1967 and comparing to India’s use of preventative detention. The author offers a typology of mechanisms of continuity to support her argument that the specific mechanism through which administrative continuity occurs following regime change affects the new regime or state’s commitment to the rule of law and citizen’s rights.

2015 - The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Words: 249 words || 
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5. Akande, Issac. "Settler-Colonialism, Internal Colonialism, and the Cherokee Freedmen Controversy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The Native American and Indigenous Studies Association, Hyatt Regency on Capitol Hill, Washington, D.C., Jun 04, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-05-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p986698_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma’s 2007 attempt to disenroll from the tribal nation the African-American Freedmen, who descended from slaves owned by the Cherokee Nation prior to the Civil War and were made citizens of said nation via the 1866 treaty that the Cherokee Nation signed with the United States. In recent years scholars have investigated the racialization of the Cherokee Nation including; Yarbrough (2008) chronicling of the Cherokee Nation’s history of fostering a racial ideology through their regulation of interracial marriage, Naylor’s (2008) historical exploration of the history of Cherokee slavery, citizenship, and how African Americans embraced Cherokee citizenship to the combat racial discrimination, and Sturm’s (2002; 2011) contemporary investigations of the construction of Cherokee identity, race, and “racial shifting.” But these scholars have not framed the current the Freedman biopolitical controversy within the proper colonial context of American settler-colonialism and/or Cherokee internal colonialism. I aim to address this void by expanding upon the work of Byrd (2011) who framed the Freedmen controversy within an internal colonial context. Here I will advance the theoretical framework by placing the actions of the Cherokee Nation towards the Freedmen within a colonial context in order or provide a better analysis of the attempted Freedmen disenrollment. I argue that the Cherokee have adopted colonial techniques, making the Freedmen internal colonial subjects, as a means of terminating their tribal membership in order to cause their “disappearance” from the Cherokee Nation, and force their complete assimilation into the larger American landscape.

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