Guest  

 
Search: 
Search By: SubjectAbstractAuthorTitleFull-Text

 

Showing 1 through 5 of 2,059 records.
Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 412 - Next  Jump:
2010 - 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies Words: 65 words || 
Info
1. Lindsey, Howard. "Chocolate City With Colonial Fillings; Detroit, Michigan as Colony and Neo-Colony" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p399575_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Black America is a 'domestic colony' of White America. It parallels the relationship between England and the thirteen colonies before the American Revolutionary War. The concept is centered on economic control by the 'mother country'--White America-- over the colonial subjects, Black America. For a closer examination of this model, the city of Detroit will be used to illustrate the colonial/neo-colonial model in a contemporary setting.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 251 words || 
Info
2. Kim, Yerhee. "Colonial Modernity and Decadence in Korea under Japanese Colonial Rule: Aesthetics and Politics of Colonial Modernism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1191299_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: Modern times are experienced in the paradoxical movement of progress and destruction. Modernity itself involves the ambivalent features of progress and decline, so historical advance can be also perceived as the history of decadence. Interestingly, in colonial space both aspects of the progress and decline of modernity are experienced at the same time. It is not decline of progressed objects, but it is progress itself is experienced as decline. For example, the more modern buildings and roads were constructed, the more Koreans perceived the colonized urban space as ruined. Lee Sang describes well such perception in his literature. In this sense, it can be said that modernity experienced in colonized space reflects the bare face of modernity, and colonialism is structured into modernity itself. Thus, discussion on modernity needs to start from a colonized space, not from Europe, the birthplace of modernity.
This paper first looks into the genealogy of decadent literature in modern Korean literature, and later discusses unique aesthetics of modernity under the colonial rule and its political implications. Kim Dong-in, Yi Sang, and Seo Jeong-ju and Oh Jang-hwan, who took part in the publication of Siin Burak (Village of Poets) will be in the center of the discussion. Approaching colonial modernity from the perspective of decadence, this study more meaningfully attempts to find the spiritual root of Yi Sang’s literature, which is considered core of modern literature of Korea, from Kim Dong-in’s. Furthermore, the unique aesthetics of colonial modernity is examined under the paradoxical relation of modernity and decadence.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 283 words || 
Info
3. Datta, Arunima. "Entangled Colonial Histories: Colonial Law and "Coolie" Intimacies in Twentieth-Century Malaya and Ceylon" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1191227_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: There is a long history of similar (at times shared) colonial laws being used to govern migration policies and post-migration lives of Indian indentured laborers in Malaya and Ceylon. While remaining confined in different, but not unique, colonial contexts, the Indian migrant ‘coolies’ had similar experiences with the colonial law in their ‘private’ lives in Ceylon and Malaya. This paper focuses on how the colonial governments in Ceylon and Malaya collaborated to govern and regulate the Indian colonial labor force (in the respective colonies) and their domestic spaces, interpersonal life, marriages, and intimate relationships. Towards the same theme, the paper simultaneously explores how such colonial policies also created episodic opportunities for colonized labor force to articulate their resilience when their ‘domestic/marital’ cases were discussed in public spaces such as in courtrooms. Based on archival research, this paper thus examines the entangled histories between the colonies of the same Empire; in particular it addresses the questions - how were these communities treated by British Empire in different locations (Malaya and Ceylon), and what these two sites reveal about the regulation of intimacy and labor? In doing so, it analyzes the transnational interactions and influences between colonies of the same Imperial projects and attempts to complicate the widespread idea of “nations” or “regions” as a self-contained unit of analysis. Studying how the colonial governments of Ceylon and Malaya interacted, borrowed and collaborated to adopt similar legal policies to govern and regulate intimacies amongst immigrants, this paper unpacks the ‘given’ definitions of ‘South Asia’ and ‘Southeast Asia’ and explores the transnational and inter-Asia nature of the British Empire. Thus, the paper contributes to the overall understanding of the shared and connected transnational histories of Asia.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 258 words || 
Info
4. Aso, Michitake. "Counting Colonial Calories: Nutrition, Bodies, and Diseases on the Rubber Plantations of French Colonial Vietnam" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1192229_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper explores the ways that the relationship of Vietnamese laboring bodies to food and disease on rubber plantations became a site of colonial contestation. It asks how new understandings of food, in particular scientific measures of nutrition such as calories and vitamins, affected the lives of workers. During the early twentieth century, colonial officials, medical doctors, planters, and laborers debated the role of nutrition in causing death and disease on rubber plantations. Archives of the labor inspectorate in Cochinchina and medical articles on nutrition show the importance of nutritional science in mediating employer and employee relations. These records show that vitamin deficiency diseases such as beriberi, combined with malaria, were among the biggest killers of workers. When planters were accused of underfeeding Vietnamese laborers, they mobilized calorie counts to argue that they supplied enough food. Planters tried to blame the workers' own bad habits, notably gambling, for their ill health. In this way, planters wielded medical expertise to deflect workers' political demands, a strategy carried forward into the postcolonial era. For their part, medical doctors and government officials played an ambivalent role in this process. While some doctors and officials pointed to the problems of poverty, they largely accepted the planters' arguments. In other words, they placed the Vietnamese body within its natural environment and isolated it from its social environment. Meanwhile, workers' bodily experience of oppression provided alternative sources of knowledge and during moments of conflict, laborers drew on this experience to reject planters' claims.

2017 - Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference Words: 250 words || 
Info
5. Fuhrmann, Arnika. "In the Mood for Colonial Revivals: Chinese Femininity and Colonial Modernity in Bangkok, Hong Kong, and Shanghai" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Asian Studies - Annual Conference, Sheraton Centre Toronto Hotel, Toronto, Canada, <Not Available>. 2019-08-17 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1188889_index.html>
Publication Type: Panel Paper
Abstract: This paper is concerned with the revivification of Chinese colonial modernity across cultural domains. Examining a transmedia archive marked by the superimposition of three cities onto one another, I focus on the material, affective, and historical doublings that occur between Bangkok, Hong Kong, and Shanghai. My analysis concentrates on femininity and the sartorial styles highlighted in visual media and hospitality venues. While Wong Kar-wai’s films turn on the nostalgic-futuristic distressing of a Chinese femininity of 1930s and 1960s Shanghai and Hong Kong, nightclubs such as Bangkok’s “Maggie Choo’s” likewise exploit Chinese femininity as part of the texture of revived colonial cosmopolitanisms. Physically, materially, and affectively, these styles of Chinese femininity and the location of post/colonial Bangkok furnish the raw material for the layering of cosmopolitan moods, textures, and histories. Especially the chronotope of Bangkok’s disavowed coloniality allows for the mobility in time necessary for the visceral reliving of a colonial ideal. Rather than dismiss it as merely bad taste or questionable politics, I examine this phenomenon as a fetish in the Marxian and psychoanalytic senses. What might the prevalence of distressed, translocal Chinese femininities tell us about alternate regional imaginaries in the present? I argue that the textures of femininity and of the city emerge as elements of film syntax and club and hotel decor, but also furnish a material substrate that breathes life into alternate regional imaginaries that exceed those of the Cold War and of an Asia ‘rising’ under the dominance of the People’s Republic of China.

Pages: Previous - 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 ... 412 - Next  Jump:

©2019 All Academic, Inc.   |   All Academic Privacy Policy