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2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Haltom, Trenton. and Ratcliff, Shawn. "Come Out, Whoever You Are! Coming Out and Identity Salience across the Life Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1245606_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The processes involved in coming out as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) include both private and public components which vary across the life course and within race, class, and gender. Using data from the Pew Research Center’s Survey of LGBT Adults, we consider how coming out privately and publicly affects identity salience within race, class, and gender demographics over the life course. Multinomial and ordinal logistic regression are used for analysis. Racial differences indicate a disconnect between the private acceptance and public disclosure of LGB identity, specifically between white and black respondents. LGB identity salience for those of college age suggest that this time is a formative time in identity maintenance. As for gender, women, relative to men, tend to come out at later ages, specifically when 30 or older. We find no evidence that the timing of coming out (private or public) matters with regards to LGB identity salience.

2008 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: 21 pages || Words: 8683 words || 
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2. Martin, Alfred. "Coming-Out in Black and White: A Literature Review of the Coming-Out Process for Black Men" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Sheraton Boston and the Boston Marriott Copley Place, Boston, MA, Jul 31, 2008 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p241361_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This article reviews literature on the coming-out process for gay men in general and gay black men in particular. The article examines how gay men come to accept their homosexuality and some of the factors that influence, or prohibit gay black men from coming-out. Although there is no consensus on one way that gay men come to accept their homosexuality, there is largely agreement among scholars that the coming-out process happens in stages. I propose that with current changes in societal acceptance of homosexuality, further research be done to determine how and if the coming-out process for gay black men has become easier and if the stages have changed. In addition, further research is needed to study the time in which gay black men take to go from realizing their same-sex attraction to fully coming-out as gay men.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 45 pages || Words: 10827 words || 
Info
3. Gibbs, Jennifer., Lai, Chih-Hui. and Ellison, Nicole. "First Comes Love, Then Comes Google: An Investigation of Communication Privacy Management Strategies and Self-Disclosure in Online Dating" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2018-09-20 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301063_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the relationship between privacy management behaviors and self-disclosure among online dating participants, drawing on Petronio’s (2002) Communication Privacy Management Theory (CPM). We propose a conceptual model integrating individual decision criteria, privacy rules (as manifest in strategies for verifying disclosures made by communication partners), and self-disclosure which is tested on a nationwide sample of online dating participants (N=562). Our findings confirm that verification strategies are predicted by three sets of online dating concerns - personal security, misrepresentation, and recognition – as well as self-efficacy and Internet experience. In turn, those who engage in more frequent verification strategies report greater amounts of self-disclosure with potential online dating partners. Implications for CPM theory and the warranting principle in online contexts (Walther & Parks, 2002) are discussed.

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