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2017 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Haltom, Trenton. and Ratcliff, Shawn. "Come Out, Whoever You Are! Coming Out and Identity Salience across the Life Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Palais des Congrès de Montréal, Montreal, Canada, Aug 12, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1245606_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The processes involved in coming out as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) include both private and public components which vary across the life course and within race, class, and gender. Using data from the Pew Research Center’s Survey of LGBT Adults, we consider how coming out privately and publicly affects identity salience within race, class, and gender demographics over the life course. Multinomial and ordinal logistic regression are used for analysis. Racial differences indicate a disconnect between the private acceptance and public disclosure of LGB identity, specifically between white and black respondents. LGB identity salience for those of college age suggest that this time is a formative time in identity maintenance. As for gender, women, relative to men, tend to come out at later ages, specifically when 30 or older. We find no evidence that the timing of coming out (private or public) matters with regards to LGB identity salience.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 45 pages || Words: 10827 words || 
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2. Gibbs, Jennifer., Lai, Chih-Hui. and Ellison, Nicole. "First Comes Love, Then Comes Google: An Investigation of Communication Privacy Management Strategies and Self-Disclosure in Online Dating" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p301063_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This study investigates the relationship between privacy management behaviors and self-disclosure among online dating participants, drawing on Petronio’s (2002) Communication Privacy Management Theory (CPM). We propose a conceptual model integrating individual decision criteria, privacy rules (as manifest in strategies for verifying disclosures made by communication partners), and self-disclosure which is tested on a nationwide sample of online dating participants (N=562). Our findings confirm that verification strategies are predicted by three sets of online dating concerns - personal security, misrepresentation, and recognition – as well as self-efficacy and Internet experience. In turn, those who engage in more frequent verification strategies report greater amounts of self-disclosure with potential online dating partners. Implications for CPM theory and the warranting principle in online contexts (Walther & Parks, 2002) are discussed.

2008 - Southern Political Science Association Pages: 26 pages || Words: 6057 words || 
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3. Bailey, Mandi. and Craig, Mandy. "Coming Out and Staying In: The Electoral Consequences of Coming Out as Gay" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, Hotel Intercontinental, New Orleans, LA, Jan 09, 2008 <Not Available>. 2019-12-09 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p228975_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Candidates for political office have used homophobic rhetoric in the attempt to make their opponents appear less appealing. Senator Jesse Helms used this approach against opponent Harvey Gantt; Linda Chavez did the same when challenging Barbara Mikulski; and when Ed Koch challenged Mario Cuomo to become governor of New York Koch’s sexuality became an issue. Gantt, Koch, nor Mikulski were out as gay in these campaigns. In fact, Gantt’s heterosexuality wasn’t questioned, Koch professed his heterosexuality, and Mikulski did not address the issue. In these cases, a link to homosexuality was employed as a negative campaigning tool, but none of the candidates involved were openly gay. How then would we expect voters to react to incumbents that came out as gay prior to reelection?
The central research question driving this study is “What are the electoral consequences of gay incumbents publicly disclosing their sexuality to the media?” In order to examine this question, we consider incumbents’ margins of victory prior to and following the coming out process. Because we are interested in how coming out as gay impacts a candidate’s reelection hopes, we exclude candidates from our analysis that initially ran for office openly as gay. Additionally, in order to maximize the number of observations used while comparing campaigns that operate within similar time frames, we utilize campaigns for state legislatures. These data are obtained from the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund and yield 51 observations.
Ultimately, we expect that the sooner incumbents come out as gay the better. More specifically, the closer incumbents come out relative to Election Day, the more their margins of victory will decrease relative to earlier elections. Additionally, we expect that region plays a pivotal role with gay incumbents defending their seats in the Southeast and Midwest being impacted more negatively than gay incumbents in other regions.

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