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2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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1. Springer, Nina. and Nuernbergk, Christian. "Commenting User Networks: Two Case Studies on Interactions and Behavioral Self-Regulation in Comments Sections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107405_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: No remedy to foster civil user discussions on online news sites seems to have been found as yet, but there is some evidence for the behavioral self-regulating power of a community. However, the communities formed by commenting users have not yet entered into the scope of communication research. This paper is based on two case studies of such networks emerging via comments on a selected topic on two German news sites. One allows for anonymous commenting (WELT), the other requires the disclosure of real names (FAZ.NET). We tracked the users’ interactions and illustrated their interconnectedness and the valence of postings. Additionally, we qualitatively analyzed comments that showed regulative character. We found that the shape and structure of both networks differ, with varying levels of interactivity and reciprocity. A stronger cohesion and specific evaluative behavior of the FAZ network indicates comparatively greater social pressure and more cues for community self-regulation.

2012 - Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Pages: unavailable || Words: 6681 words || 
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2. Holton, Avery., Lee, Na Yeon. and Coleman, Renita. "Commenting on health: A framing analysis of user comments in response to health articles online" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, Chicago Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2012 Online <PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p578809_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Public health officials have continually urged journalists and other members of the news media to ease off health frames that focus on individuals and to promote broader societal frames instead. While some scholarly research has reinforced these pleas, none have examined the interplay between frames of health news coverage and resulting public comments. The current online environment invites such an analysis, allowing news organizations to post articles online and the public to comment on those articles. Using a content analysis, this study reveals thematic frames in online health stories may lead to thematic responses, but episodic stories may not lead to episodic comments. Further, the findings reveal other textual factors—gain and loss frames and mobilizing information—that may be driving the volume and frames of user comments to health stories online.

2015 - International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: 9139 words || 
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3. Wolfgang, David. and Coman, Ioana. "New Media, New Phenomena: An Analysis of Online Commenters’ Perceptions of Media and Commenter Performance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association 65th Annual Conference, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 21, 2015 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p985748_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In order to understand how online commenters can establish normative expectations of the goals of journalism and participatory public discourse, the researchers conducted a qualitative textual analysis of online comments in response to the Newtown shooting. The analysis elucidated expectations of how the media should report important political and social events and how commenters should effectively engage with one another in discourse. The analysis showed that American and French online commenters expect journalists to follow through with traditional journalistic norms of fully reporting information, setting the issue agenda, and refraining from sensationalizing. Commenters expect fellow participants in discourse to ascribe to traditional journalistic norms of being accurate and transparent with their sources, however, there was also an expectation that commenters should behave in accordance with traditional social norms of being respectful, tolerant, and engaging in intelligent commentary.

2017 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 10028 words || 
Info
4. Riedl, Martin J.. "Killing the Comments: Examining the Demise of Online Comments Sections" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Chicago Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile, Chicago, IL, Aug 09, 2017 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1282541_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Media outlets are increasingly switching off comments sections – spaces formerly hailed as affordances for public deliberation. Drawing on the tragedy of the commons theory, this study explores media outlets’ rationales for such decisions. Applying textual analysis to 21 media outlets’ official statements to abandon comments sections, it identifies a taxonomy of justifications. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

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