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2010 - ASC Annual Meeting Words: 70 words || 
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1. Lambert, Eric., Hogan, Nancy. and Griffin, Marie. "The Effects of Continuance Commitment, Moral Commitment, and Affective Commitment on Prison Staff" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431667_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The correctional staff literature contends that organizational commitment has salient outcomes for both correctional staff and correctional organizations. What is not clear is if the effects differ by the major forms of organizational commitment (continuance commitment, moral commitment, and affective commitment). This study examined the effects of continuance commitment, moral commitment, and affective commitment on correctional orientation (support for punishment, support for treatment, absenteeism views, turnover intent, and life satisfaction).

2008 - NCA 94th Annual Convention Pages: 32 pages || Words: 6688 words || 
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2. Weigel, Daniel., O'Riordan, Cailin. and Brown, Camille. "The Everyday Expressions of Commitment: The Role of Commitment Level, Relationship Certainty, and Commitment Indicators on Positive Relationship Outcomes" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 94th Annual Convention, TBA, San Diego, CA, Nov 20, 2008 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p256417_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: This study explored the role of the communication of commitment, commitment level, and relationship uncertainty on perceptions of relationship quality and stability. Data collected from 230 people in romantic relationships indicated people more strongly committed reported less uncertainty, greater use of commitment indicators, and more positive feelings about their relationship. Also, those with greater commitment and less uncertainty sustained their relationship over a period of four months. Implications as well as limitations are discussed.

2015 - SRCD Biennial Meeting Words: 497 words || 
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3. Henderson, Annette. and Low, Rachel. "You violated a commitment once, but you won’t do it again: Infants' expectations of joint commitments in a third party cooperation" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SRCD Biennial Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center and the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown Hotel, Philadelphia, PA, <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p962719_index.html>
Publication Type: Presentation
Abstract: Cooperation is fundamental to our everyday lives and allows humans to function successfully as part of a society. Successful cooperation requires individuals to work together to attain a shared goal, as well as abide by the social norms and expectations required of cooperative partners. That is, individuals who have agreed to act together to attain a shared goal will continue to fulfill his or her role in the joint activity until the shared goal is achieved. Violations of this cooperative norm would be viewed as a breach of agreement and should be treated accordingly. Toddlers’ attempts to re-engage their cooperative partner who had stopped completing her role suggest that a sensitivity to these cooperative norms develops early in life (Gräfenhain et al., 2009; Ross & Lollis, 1987; Tomasello et al., 2006). Preschool-aged children’s sensitivity to cooperative norms is expressed through a tendency to adjust their subsequent interactions with individuals who have violated a joint agreement (Warneken, Gräfenhain, & Tomasello, 2012). We investigated whether younger infants are sensitive to cooperative norms using a novel visual familiarisation paradigm. We tested whether infants use information about a person’s tendency to either abide by, or violate, an established joint commitment to form judgments about his/her future behaviour in a similar cooperative context.

Thirty-six 16-month-olds were familiarised to two events in which two actors agreed to work together to build a block tower. In the cooperative event the actors successfully built the tower and then agreed to knock it over. In the uncooperative event the actors started to work together, but before the tower was complete, one actor threw a block at the tower and knocked it down thereby violating the joint agreement. After familiarization, infants watched two block tower building test trials in which either the cooperative or uncooperative actor from familiarization was either cooperative (i.e., built the tower) or was uncooperative (i.e., knocked the tower over) with a new person. The results revealed that infants looked longer when the previously cooperative actor was uncooperative with a new person (p = .037, ηpartial2 = .24; see Fig. 1), particularly when infants were shown the uncooperative test trial first (p = .032, ηpartial2 = .46). Infants who saw the uncooperative actor at test looked longer when the actor was also uncooperative with a new person, (p = .024, ηpartial2 = .28). Interestingly, an equal number of infants in both conditions (i.e., 14 out of 18) looked longer towards the uncooperative test trials than they did the cooperative test trials, p = .031 (sign test).

These findings suggest that 16-month-old infants expect individuals to adhere to their established joint commitment, even if they had broken the commitment in the past. One possibility is that infants this young do not form trait-like judgments of individuals who violate cooperative norms. However, it is also possible that the nature of the cooperative activity influenced the extent to which infants viewed the violation as a particularly serious offence. Future work will examine these questions.

2015 - American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting Words: 138 words || 
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4. Akoensi, Thomas. "Satisfied and Committed Prison Officers? An Exploration of Job Satisfaction and Organisational Commitment Among Prison Officers in Ghana" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Criminology – 71st Annual Meeting, Washington Hilton, Washington, DC, Nov 18, 2015 <Not Available>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1030484_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper aims to contribute to the limited literature on prison officer job satisfaction and organisational commitment in Sub-saharan Africa. Drawing on interviews with 78 frontline prison officers in Ghana, this article documents the sources of job satisfaction and organisational commitment and their impact on prison officers. While intrinsic aspects of prison work involving opportunities for inmate rehabilitation, benefit-finding, recognition and praise for work conduced towards job satisfaction, extrinsic motivators such as salaries and environmental working conditions engendered job dissatisfaction. On organisational commitment, it emerged that all three dimensions of commitment – affective, normative and continuance were important determinants of organisational commitment. However, while affective commitment engendered high commitment, normative and continuance dimensions of prison work contributed to low organisational commitment. These findings are discussed in relation to the specific historical and organisational context of prisons in Ghana.

2018 - American Sociological Association Annual Meeting Pages: unavailable || Words: 8842 words || 
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5. Harris, Lauren. "By Living Together, I'm Completely Committed to You: Cohabitation and Childbearing as Commitment" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Pennsylvania Convention Center & Philadelphia Marriott, Philadelphia, PA, Aug 09, 2018 Online <PDF>. 2019-12-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1376953_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Recent increases in the average age at first marriage and declines in the overall marriage rate, coupled with increased rates of cohabitation and childbearing before and without marriage, have led some social commentators to posit that the recent generation of young adults has renounced, or even “killed,” marriage. Further, many speculate that young people do not value marriage, generating the perceived explosion of unmarried young adults in the last few decades. Through individual interviews with middle-class, heterosexual couples between the ages of 24-37, this research will address young adults’ perception of marriage, cohabitation, engagement, and childbearing. These dating, engaged, or married individuals make it clear that marriage is desired, though there are other, and sometimes stronger, ways then enact commitment. For some, cohabitation holds the same value, whereas for others, childbearing creates the unbreakable bond. Many spoke of establishing commitment to their partners by sharing a home together. Others note that marriage was dissolvable but having a child together was the truest enactment of commitment. Regardless, all respondents wanted to marry eventually, were planning their weddings, or had already married, illustrating that the desire to marry is alive and well among young adults.

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