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2016 - 40th Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference Words: 163 words || 
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1. Holloway, Adrienne. "Asset Based Community Development and Community Safety in Communities of Color-Is ABCD a valid methodology to reach community safety goals?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 40th Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference, Omni Charlotte Hotel, Charlotte, North Carolina, Mar 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1130775_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Asset Based Community Development (ABCD), introduced to the community development field by John Kretzmann and John McKnight in the early 1990s, conceptualized a new approach to community building that fostered sustainable community development through the recognition and appreciation of community assets. They argued that examining communities through a positive lens fosters a sense of self-reliance and pride among community members, mobilizes community resources to effectuate desired improvements, and ultimately build strong communities. Though deemed a successful approach over the last several decades by practitioners and scholars alike, it relevancy, in its original form is questioned when increasing safety through the establishment of mutually beneficial relationships with public safety officers, particularly in communities of color, is the focal point of desired change. This presentation will discuss several initiatives that embrace the ABCD methodology in an effort to build communities of color in the City of Chicago related to enhancing community and police force relationships and the overall sense of safety within identified Chicago neighborhoods.

2019 - American Sociological Association Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
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2. Olivier, Jasmine. "The Community in Community Policing: How Community Attachment Shapes Police Perceptions of Their Assigned Community" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton New York Midtown & Sheraton New York Times Square Hotel, New York City, Aug 09, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1512338_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Scholars, politicians, and policymakers have called for reforms to strengthen police-community relations within communities of color. Among these recommendations include community policing, i.e. greater community outreach and increased racial and ethnic diversity (based on theories of racial homophily and community attachment) within police departments. However, despite the widespread use of the phrase “community-policing,” there is a lack of scholarly attention to how police officers perceive the communities in which they work, which I argue influences their willingness to engage in community policing within that locale. Drawing on the community attachment literature, I examine the relationship between police officers’ attachment to their communities and police perceptions of the communities in which they work. In particular, I examine five types of community attachment, particularly: 1) institutional ties, 2) racial/ethnic ties, 3) organizational/social ties, i.e. formal and informal engagement with community members; 4) family and friend networks; and the 5) affective attachment of police officers to their assigned locales. Through in-depth interviews with 36 police officers, I found that the relationship between police officers’ community attachment and police perceptions is largely contextual. Some police officers who exhibited several forms of community attachment had positive perceptions of the community whereas others did not. Thus, community attachment does not necessarily induce positive relations and in some cases, can lead to negative police perceptions. Police officers who expressed affective attachment to their communities, however, expressed positive perceptions of, and vested interests in their assigned community. I discuss the implications of these findings throughout this working paper.

2016 - CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships Words: 115 words || 
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3. Mercado, Kathryn., Sipocz, Ashley., Mason, Maryann., Bishop, Virgnia., Curry, Gina. and Brown, Jen. "How Can Clinical Trials Be More Community Engaged?: Community Perspectives on Engagement in Clinical Research Design, Education, and Promotion with Diverse Communities" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the CCPH 14th International Conference - Journey to Justice: Creating Change Through Partnerships, Crowne Plaza French Quarter, New Orleans, LA, May 11, 2016 <Not Available>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1099120_index.html>
Publication Type: Real-time workshop
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: An extensive literature discusses community perspectives on clinical trial participation, barriers to participation, and interventions to increase diverse participation. But we found no published studies on how community-based organizations (CBOs) view their potential role in advising trial design/conduct, educating communities about trials or promoting trial participation. The Alliance for Research in Chicagoland Communities in Northwestern University’s Center for Community Health is exploring this through focus groups with CBO, faith-based and patient advocacy organizations. Our community and academic team will present initial focus group analyses and seek feedback from session participants on meaningful and feasible mechanisms for community engagement in clinical trial design, conduct, and dissemination and the development of equitable bidirectional relationships with trial investigators.

2009 - International Communication Association Pages: 57 pages || Words: 13871 words || 
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4. Nam, Yujung. "Cultural Participation and Stronger Community Life: Multilevel Analysis of Participation in Community Organizations and Cultural Events as an Indicator of Strong Community Belonging and Local Storytelling Network" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Marriott, Chicago, IL, May 20, 2009 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p300900_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Active participation in community organizations and cultural events is a strong indicator of resident’s sense of belonging to the community and integration into local storytelling network. The communication infrastructure theory (CIT) provides a useful framework to understand the contextual effects of resident’s participation in community-based cultural events as a part of larger communication environments in the community-building process and civic engagement. This study examines the processes that two community-based events, the Fiestas Patrias and the Korean Festival, undertake in order to play key roles in local storytelling networks that are associated with establishing and strengthening the connections between community residents and local organizations and, as a result, increasing a member’s integration into the community, a necessary step to increasing the civic engagement. I will look at 1) which cultural practices help local events become an integral part of the storytelling network and, as a result, 2) how storytelling roles as undertaken by community organizations and cultural events affect community members’ civic engagement and sense of belonging to their neighborhoods in regard to the CIT perspective. Linear regression analyses of surveys conducted with community participants illustrate that active participation in local events enhance a sense of belonging and engagement in their community by connecting them to other residents through meso level local storytelling networks. It is congruent with the CIT that community-based local events as local storytelling agents bridge the geo-ethnic immigrant communities and local community media and organizations and, as a result, reinforce community engagement in the neighborhood.

2019 - AEJMC Pages: unavailable || Words: 6772 words || 
Info
5. Atkins, Aaron., Meyer, Hans. and Peko, Samantha. "VR as Community News Solution - Connecting communities, helping audiences trust community journalists more with immersive technology" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the AEJMC, Sheraton Centre Toronto, Toronto, Canada, Aug 07, 2019 Online <PDF>. 2020-02-25 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1556150_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: One of the compelling aspects of 360-degree virtual reality news content, research suggests, is that it engages many of the hallmarks of community journalism, namely geographic community, online community, cultural identity, and community-oriented information needs. Yet community news organizations remain reluctant to use it. This experiment compared a non-linear, interactive VR news experience about a small town in West Virginia facing environmental challenges with a traditional print news story and examined the effects the story type had on learning, enjoyment, credibility, and sense of community. It found that VR can enhance the overall credibility a participant assigned to the media and the sense of community they feel, especially for women over men. While it did not find VR had a significant impact on story credibility, perceptions of media bias, and learning, it provide suggestions for further study of these concepts. Overall, it suggests that VR could be an alternative for community news organizations looking to foster greater connections with communities outside of main readership areas.

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