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2016 - 40th Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference Words: 163 words || 
Info
1. Holloway, Adrienne. "Asset Based Community Development and Community Safety in Communities of Color-Is ABCD a valid methodology to reach community safety goals?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 40th Annual National Council for Black Studies Conference, Omni Charlotte Hotel, Charlotte, North Carolina, Mar 16, 2016 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1130775_index.html>
Publication Type: Individual Abstract
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Asset Based Community Development (ABCD), introduced to the community development field by John Kretzmann and John McKnight in the early 1990s, conceptualized a new approach to community building that fostered sustainable community development through the recognition and appreciation of community assets. They argued that examining communities through a positive lens fosters a sense of self-reliance and pride among community members, mobilizes community resources to effectuate desired improvements, and ultimately build strong communities. Though deemed a successful approach over the last several decades by practitioners and scholars alike, it relevancy, in its original form is questioned when increasing safety through the establishment of mutually beneficial relationships with public safety officers, particularly in communities of color, is the focal point of desired change. This presentation will discuss several initiatives that embrace the ABCD methodology in an effort to build communities of color in the City of Chicago related to enhancing community and police force relationships and the overall sense of safety within identified Chicago neighborhoods.

2016 - ICA's 66th Annual Conference Pages: unavailable || Words: unavailable || 
Info
2. Park, Jae Hee. and McMillan, Sally. "Cultural Differences in Online Community Motivations: Exploring Korean Automobile Online Brand Communities (KAOBCs) and American Automobile Online Brand Communities (AAOBCs)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ICA's 66th Annual Conference, Hilton Fukuoka Sea Hawk, Fukuoka, Japan, Jun 09, 2016 Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1107977_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: To gain a better understanding of online brand communities, this study has examined why people joined in online brand communities and whether there were some differences in the motivations of Internet users based on different cultures. Open-ended questions were asked to the community members from both South Korean Automobile Online Brand Communities (KAOBC) and American Automobile Online Brand Communities (AAOBC) in the first stage and then generated and utilized an online survey for the study. The study found that KAOBC members tended to have a stronger social network, business, and communication motivations than AAOBC members. As a primary motivation, information seeking is the strongest motivation for members of both KAOBC and AAOBC. They had a similar level of information motivation.

2004 - American Sociological Association Words: 51 words || 
Info
3. Rubin, Victor. "The Search for Common Ground: Community Organizers, Community Builders, and Community Developers in Oakland" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Hilton San Francisco & Renaissance Parc 55 Hotel, San Francisco, CA,, Aug 14, 2004 <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p111129_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In recent years, local groups in Oakland, California, have pioneered new and innovative models for organizing multi-racial and labor-community alliances, and for combining grassroots activism with urban planning and policy development. In this panel, leading local participants and researchers discuss the ways in which Oaklanders are currently remaking urban community.

2012 - International Communication Association Words: 226 words || 
Info
4. Nossek, Hillel. "From Community Media to Media Communities: Can a Medium be a Community?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Sheraton Phoenix Downtown, Phoenix, AZ, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p557507_index.html>
Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: Since Innis and McLuhan media technology theories (Innis with the creation of Empires and McLuhan with the Nation State and the Global Village,) the history of inspiring new life into old ideas or ideals of community life is interconnected with the appearance of new media technologies. The print media (e.g. community newspaper) then community radio and community TV were advocated by theorists as well as activists, each in turn as a promise to a better community life. Research showed the old and new media technologies contributes to strong ties and created new life in old communities, but all dealt with the sociological definitions of community based on common history, a sense of belonging and common goals that created common social institutions. Even the beginning of the Internet saw the same characteristics, but at the same time brought forth first the idea of virtual communities based of forums and chat rooms and then moved to the trend of social media that basically claims that the medium creates the community.

The paper will ask whether the use of social terms and definitions to describe the phenomenon really helps us understand the phenomena theoretically and empirically.

The theoretical framework for studying and understanding of the social media role in the Arab spring as well as the middle class protests in the Western hemisphere are relevant case studies.

2015 - 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action Words: 154 words || 
Info
5. Mooss, Angela. and Hartman, Megan. "Partnering with low-resource community-based organizations: How community psychologists uniquely meet community needs" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 15th Biennial Conference of the Society for Community Research and Action, UMass Lowell Inn & Conference Center, Lowell, MA, <Not Available>. 2019-06-16 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p1006802_index.html>
Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Community Psychologists are the key to make implementation science work on the ground level. Local agencies voice a tremendous need for the competencies of community psychologists who provide expertise in capacity building and technical assistance for implementing projects that may have rigorous evaluation and evidence-based practice requirements; a growing mandate from funders. This presentation will describe community psychology contributions to federally funded projects in Miami, Florida. We will focus on the challenges local agencies face meeting federal requirements to implement evidence-based programs and interventions with few resources for fidelity monitoring or infrastructure support. We will describe how we have collaborated with community based organizations to address and overcome these challenges to implementation science as well as identifying and empowering champions within organizations to serve as the prevention support system. This key partnership between champions, organizations, and community psychologists works to ensure sustainability beyond grant funding and in closing the research-reality gap.

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